Cases reported "Arm Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/135. Imaging of blunt arterial trauma of the upper extremity in children.

    We report four patients with blunt arterial trauma of the upper limb following unusual mechanisms of injury in two patients (one fell on the handlebars of his bicycle, the second was crushed by a moving lawn mower) and due to bicycle accidents in two further patients. The use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in all patients, together with colour Doppler imaging (CDI) in one patient, provided optimum preoperative identification and localisation of the arterial lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/135. A continuum between scapulothoracic dissociation and traumatic forequarter amputation: a review of the literature.

    Both traumatic forequarter amputation and scapulothoracic dissociation are rare and life-threatening injuries. We present the case of a 31-year old woman who was ejected from a car after a motor vehicle accident and sustained an apparent partial forequarter amputation. Upon examination her injury was found to share many characteristics with a scapulothoracic dissociation injury. With both injuries mortality is high and prompt diagnosis and treatment imperative. By viewing scapulothoracic dissociation and forequarter amputation as a continuum faster recognition and appropriate treatment may be implemented for these devastating injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/135. Trans-thoracic venous bullet embolism.

    Bullet emboli from peripheral wounds occur with sufficient frequency that they must be considered in every case of missile injury not accompanied by an exit wound. A case is presented which demonstrated a venous migration of such a bullet from the axillary vein into the femoral vein through the heart, presumably by gravity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/135. Early decompression fasciotomy in the treatment of high-voltage electrical burns of the extremities.

    Based on a knowledge of electropathophysiology, a recommended treatment has been proposed for the management of extensive high-voltage electrical burns. Early, aggressive, surgical intervention consisting of adequate decompression fasciotomy and wound debridement has been emphasized as the first line of treatment. Frequent redebridements under general anesthesia are important to the preservation of viable tissue. Early coverage procedures or attempts at primary closure following decompression are contraindicated in high-voltage injuries. This method of treatment in eight cases of high-voltage, electrical injury has preserved viable tissue, decreased the incidence of fatal sepsis and renal shutdown, decreased patient morbidity, and generally facilitated patient rehabilitation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/135. Acute nerve grafting in traumatic injuries: two case studies.

    Primary nerve grafting in traumatic injuries is rarely performed because of the uncertainty of the extent of injury, the limited availability of nerve grafts, and the damage to adjacent soft tissue. In this report the authors present two cases of acute nerve grafting after trauma-the first of the common peroneal nerve and the second of the ulnar nerve above the elbow-with sensory and motor recovery. Although compelling general arguments against primary posttraumatic nerve grafting exist, these cases illustrate that, in certain favorable and critical clinical situations, acute nerve grafting may be successful.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/135. The intravenous foreign body: a report of 2 cases.

    Two cases of metallic foreign body injury to the upper limb are described. In both cases the foreign body was clearly visible on x-rays, considered to be lodged in the soft tissues, but migrated to one of the large subcutaneous veins. One subsequently migrated to the heart; the other was removed from the peripheral vein.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/135. Heroic procedures in vascular injury management: the role of extra-anatomic bypasses.

    The insertion of an extra-anatomic bypass graft is an accepted operative technique in highly selected patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease and contraindications to in situ grafting. In similar fashion, the technique should be considered in injured or septic patients with large soft tissue defects or wound infections overlying arterial repairs or involving native arteries. The combination of vigorous debridement of injured or infected soft tissue and insertion of an extra-anatomic bypass graft allows for appropriate care of the wound without concern for further injury to the now-displaced arterial repair.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/135. Tragic case of a dog bite in a young child: the dog stands trial.

    The authors present the tragic case of an 18-month-old child who was bitten by a dog, causing amputation of the forearm and substantial damage to the cutaneous muscle on his back, shoulder, thorax, and neck. A free latissimus dorsi flap was performed to preserve the humerus from which the periosteum had been torn away. A series of cutaneous expansions were then undertaken to graft skin back onto the back, the armpit, and the shoulder stump, to allow for a mechanical prosthesis. A study of the literature on this subject proves that dog bites are more frequent and serious (sometimes even fatal) in young children than in adults. In view of the current legislation, it would seem that the public health authorities are doing little to resolve this distressing problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.18102528549781
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/135. Volkmann's ischemia. A volar compartment syndrome of the forearm.

    In a series of 19 patients with Volkmann's iscemia, 63 per cent had suffered skeletal trauma, whereas 38 per cent had received non-skeletal trauma. Non-specific trauma may trigger an ischemia-edema cycle, producing increased intracompartmental pressure. This cycle, if unrelieved, can involve all of the muscles in the compartment, via cyclic propagation and reinforcement of arterial spasm. The volar compartmental syndrome is not an all or none phenomenon. Localized ischemia may trigger a gradually spreading arterial spasm which results in slowly progressive clinical changes as late as 3-4 months after onset. decompression not only of the compartment but of each individual muscle which shows evidence of vascular compromise, may reverse this destructive cycle even as late as 3-4 months but it should be performed promptly with the onset of symptoms, when its effect is rapid and dramatic. Induration of the compartment is pathognomonic of the compartmental syndrome. As long as it is present, benefit can be expected from decompression procedures. regeneration of necrotic ischemic muscle is possible following restoration of circulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.72410114199123
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/135. Facial fractures and related injuries: a ten-year retrospective analysis.

    A retrospective analysis of 828 patients with significant midface or mandibular fractures was undertaken to illustrate the multisystem nature of traumatic injuries associated with fracture of the facial skeleton, covering the period from 1985 to 1994. Special emphasis was placed on determining associated injuries sustained as well as epidemiological information. The experience presented differs from other large series in the literature in that the predominant mechanism of injury is motor vehicle accidents (67%) rather than assaults. Of the patients reviewed, 89% sustained significant associated injuries. Closed head trauma with documented loss of consciousness was noted most frequently (40%), followed by extremity fractures (33%), thoracic trauma (29%), and traumatic brain injuries (25%). Only 11% of patients sustained facial fractures without concomitant injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arm Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.