Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/53. Embolization of a life-threatening mandibular vascular malformation by direct percutaneous transmandibular puncture.

    vascular malformations of the mandible are uncommon, but often present with significant hemorrhage. Transarterial vessel occlusion has become a valuable primary or adjunctive treatment for such lesions, as well as for most other symptomatic congenital and acquired head and neck vascular anomalies. Permanent embolic obliteration of the malformation requires placement of occlusive material directly into the nidus (core) of the lesion. Prohibitively complex proximal vasculature may prevent successful catheter positioning and lead to failure of traditional embolotherapy. Even optimal placement of arterial embolic material may fail to fully obliterate the nidus, allowing eventual restoration of flow to the lesion due to arterial recanalization. Under such circumstances it may be possible to obliterate the malformation and control lesional hemorrhage by occlusion of the malformation or its venous drainage by direct percutaneous mandibular puncture. In our case, multiple transarterial embolizations failed to sufficiently manage a symptomatic vascular malformation. Successful embolotherapy was performed via direct puncture of the venous side of the malformation through the mandibular cortex. venous thrombosis induced concomitant occlusion of abnormal arteriovenous shunts, resulting in long-term control of life-threatening oral hemorrhage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/53. External jugular vein vascular malformation: sonographic and MR imaging appearances.

    vascular malformations arising from the wall of the external jugular vein are rare. This case series discusses the sonographic and MR imaging appearances of four such cases and reviews the literature. The diagnosis should be suggested preoperatively particularly because of the close relationship such malformations to the external jugular vein, as this helps surgeons to plan the operative procedure. The imaging appearances are similar to those of other vascular malformations elsewhere in the head and neck.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/53. Resection of a massive arteriovenous malformation of the head and neck.

    We report a patient with a massive arteriovenous malformation of the head and neck treated by surgical extirpation of the lesion. Arteriography, hypotensive hypothermic anesthesia, and the intraoperative use of the Doppler flowmeter were most helpful in this case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/53. Compartmentalization of massive vascular malformations.

    A total of 18 patients with massive vascular malformations of the head and neck region were treated with compartmentalization using nonabsorbable sutures followed by injection of a sclerosant agent into each compartment. The indication for compartmentalization was either to stop potentially uncontrollable, life-threatening hemorrhage during the dissection of the lesion or to reduce its vascularity to allow a less dangerous subsequent resection. Compartmentalization was used in both high-flow and low-flow vascular malformations. In this technique, large nonabsorbable sutures are placed deeply in multiple areas within the lesion. The aim is to divide the malformation into multiple compartments by changing the direction of the suturing; in this way the sclerosing agent is provided with a more effective environment. The sclerosant used was either sodium tetradecyl sulfate 3%, absolute alcohol, or both. The total amount of infiltrate varied from 3 to 35 cc, according to the size of malformation. After compartmentalization, swelling was the most noticeable complication. With this technique, it was possible to treat what were considered untreatable malformations using standard techniques and to control the inevitable serious bleeding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/53. Three-dimensional CT angiography imaging of vascular tumors of the head and neck.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography angiography (CTA) in head and neck vascular anomalies. DESIGN: Prospective case series. methods: A consecutive series of cases of patients with distinct types of vascular anomalies (i.e. hemangioma, arteriovenous malformation, venous malformation and lymphatic malformation) were obtained through CT multislice scanner and analyzed with Vitrea 2 software (Vital Images Inc., Plymouth, MN). RESULTS: CTA was safe and successful in describing 3D vascular anatomy of a variety of vascular lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional CTA allows detailed description of vascular lesions of the head and neck and offers another effective means of imaging these complex lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/53. Arteriovenous malformation of the floor of the mouth: a case report.

    arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck are rare lesions with unclear pathogenesis. They usually present during childhood, growing proportionately to the child. Although preoperative superselective embolization followed by surgical resection is the treatment of choice, complete removal is often not feasible, leading to high recurrence rates. The case of a patient with an arteriovenous malformation of the floor of the mouth diagnosed late in her adulthood and its management are presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/53. Arteriovenous malformation of the nasopharynx: a case report.

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the head and neck is a rare vascular anomaly but when present is persistent and progressive in nature and can represent itself truly as a lethal benign disease. We present here an unusual case of an AVM with the size of 1.5 cm x 0.8 cm at the adenoid tissue found in an 8-year-old boy, which is not previously reported in the literature where we treated the patient with surgery alone. Although bleeding is a common presentation with vascular malformations, we have not seen any bleeding in our case. After the surgery, paranasal sinus and neck CT were undertaken. They showed no other AVM.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/53. Direct percutaneous ethanol instillation for treatment of venous malformation in the face and neck.

    Venous malformations of the face and neck involve multiple anatomical spaces and encase critical neuromuscular structures, making surgical treatment difficult; high recurrence rates and high morbidity are well documented. Various methods of treatment of uncertain value and risk of complications have been advocated. We present our experience in treating five patients with venous malformation in the face and neck by using direct percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy. Four patients had large lesions (> or = 3 cm; one patient had two large lesions in the low eyelid), and the other had a mid-sized lesion (1.5-3 cm). Under general or local anaesthesia, one-third to one-quarter cavity volume of ethanol was injected percutaneously, directly into the malformation with under fluoroscopy [de Lorimier AA. sclerotherapy for venous malformations. J Pediatr Surg 1995;30:188-93; Johnson PL, Eckard DA, Brecheisen MA, Girod DA, Tsue TT. Percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy of venous malformations of the tongue. Am J Neuroradiol 2002;23:779-82; Pappas DC Jr, Persky MS, Berenstein A. Evaluation and treatment of head and neck venous vascular malformations. ear nose Throat J 1998;77:914-22; Lee CH, Chen SG. Direct percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy for treatment of a recurrent venous malformation in the periorbital region. ANZ J Surg. 2004;74(12):1126-7.]. Four patients required two injections. All patients had remission and alleviation of their symptoms, with no major complications. Direct percutaneous injection of absolute ethanol provides a simple and reliable alternative treatment for venous malformation in the face and neck.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/53. angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia associated with pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    A case of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALH) is reported in a 33-year-old woman who developed an auricular nodule during the second trimester of her pregnancy. angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia usually occurs on the head and neck of young adults and is more common in women than in men. Characteristic histologic features of ALH present in this case included proliferation of thick-walled blood vessels lined by prominent endothelial cells, infiltration of the interstitium by chronic inflammatory cells (mainly eosinophils), and presence of lymphoid follicles with germinal centers. The auricular tumor was completely excised. Thirteen months after excision, the patient remains tumor free. Although there are not many case reports on ALH during pregnancy or involving use of oral contraceptive pills, sex hormones may play a role in the pathogenesis of ALH. This hypothesis, in the context of cases previously described in the literature, and the differential diagnosis of ALH are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/53. cheek and eyelid reconstruction: the resurrection of the angle rotation flap.

    BACKGROUND: Reconstruction of larger cheek and eyelid defects may pose a dilemma for surgeons, since flaps used in reconstruction may be difficult to design, be unreliable, require extensive dissection, and result in neck scarring. Consequently, the authors wish to simplify and expand an overlooked flap, the angle rotation flap, which moves tissue in both a medial and upward direction. methods: Twenty patients with cheek and eyelid defects were treated by the angle rotation flap. In this flap design, the angle designed below the ear was closed primarily and the neck tissue previously there was rotated upward and forward to lie in front of the ear. The portion of the flap that was in front of the ear was transposed to the lower lid/cheek area. This flap was modified in several patients by elevation in the deep plane and first-stage tissue expansion. RESULTS: In all cases, good coverage was provided for medial cheek and lower eyelid defects with minimal scarring on the neck. There were no flap losses of any kind. There were no major complications, and all minor incidences were treated by minimal procedures without long-term sequelae. CONCLUSION: The modified angle rotation flap is a useful tool for cheek and eyelid defects.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arteriovenous Malformations'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.