Cases reported "Arthralgia"

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1/41. Low power laser therapy and analgesic action.

    OBJECTIVE: The semiconductor or laser diode (GaAs, 904 nm) is the most appropriate choice in pain reduction therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Low-power density laser acts on the prostaglandin (PG) synthesis, increasing the change of PGG2 and PGH2 into PG12 (also called prostacyclin, or epoprostenol). The last is the main product of the arachidonic acid into the endothelial cells and into the smooth muscular cells of vessel walls, that have a vasodilating and anti-inflammatory action. methods: Treatment was performed on 372 patients (206 women and 166 men) during the period between May 1987 and January 1997. The patients, whose ages ranged from 25 to 70 years, with a mean age of 45 years, suffered from rheumatic, degenerative, and traumatic pathologies as well as cutaneous ulcers. The majority of patients had been seen by orthopedists and rheumatologists and had undergone x-ray examination. All patients had received drug-based treatment and/or physiotherapy with poor results; 5 patients had also been irradiated with He:Ne and CO2 lasers. Two-thirds were experiencing acute symptomatic pain, while the others suffered long-term pathology with recurrent crises. We used a pulsed diode laser, GaAs 904 nm wavelength once per day for 5 consecutive days, followed by a 2-day interval. The average number of applications was 12. We irradiated the trigger points, access points to the joint, and striated muscles adjacent to relevant nerve roots. RESULTS: We achieved very good results, especially in cases of symptomatic osteoarthritis of the cervical vertebrae, sport-related injuries, epicondylitis, and cutaneous ulcers, and with cases of osteoarthritis of the coxa. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with 904-nm diode laser has substantially reduced the symptoms as well as improved the quality of life of these patient, ultimately postponing the need for surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = osteoarthritis, arthritis
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2/41. Polyarthralgia-arthritis syndrome induced by low doses of rifabutin.

    We describe 2 cases of polyarthralgia-arthritis syndrome induced by rifabutin, an effective treatment for infections of mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex. This syndrome has been reported with doses higher than 1 g per day when rifabutin is given in monotherapy. But our cases were treated with low doses, 300-450 mg per day, in combination with clarithromycin. The plasma concentration of rifabutin has been shown to be increased by clarithromycin, suggesting that co-prescription of clarithromycin could lead to development of rifabutin induced polyarthralgia-arthritis syndrome.
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ranking = 0.18920650546886
keywords = arthritis
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3/41. Hereditary hemochromatosis: diagnosis and treatment in primary care.

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is one of the most common inherited disorders in the Caucasian population. diagnosis usually made after an elevation in ferritin and serum transferrin saturation is noted, often accompanied by asymptomatic hepatomegaly. diagnosis is confirmed by genetic testing or liver biopsy. Damage to organs is due to excessive intestinal iron, which is transported to and then deposited in the liver parenchyma, and the heart, skin, and endocrine organs, causing skin pigmentation, development of cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma, diabetes and endocrine failure, and heart failure. Bony changes can be manifested by arthritis, often in non-weight-bearing joints. The treatment of HHC is phlebotomy, which depletes iron stores. When diagnosis is made before organ damage occurs, treatment can prevent manifestations of the disease. skin pigmentation and some cardiac damage may reverse on depletion of iron stores, but liver and endocrine damage is rarely reversible. Arthropathy is also not reversible, and often continues to progress even with effective treatment. When hemochromatosis is diagnosed, all first degree relatives of the patient should undergo genetic testing. With early detection and treatment this can be a manageable chronic disease. If undetected, it is potentially fatal.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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4/41. Potential errors in recognition of erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    Here we describe four isolations of erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae associated with polyarthralgia and renal failure, septic arthritis, classic erysipeloid, and peritonitis. Although the biochemical identification was straightforward in each case, recognition presented a challenge to the clinical microbiologist, since in three cases E. rhusiopathiae was not initially considered due to unusual clinical presentations, in two cases the significance might not have been appreciated because growth was in broth only, and in one case the infection was thought to be polymicrobic. Because the Gram stain can be confusing, abbreviated identification schemes that do not include testing for H(2)S production could allow E. rhusiopathiae isolates to be misidentified as lactobacillus spp. or enterococcus spp. in atypical infections.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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5/41. giardiasis-associated arthralgia in children.

    BACKGROUND: giardiasis is the most common intestinal parasitosis in mexico. Usual symptoms of the acute infection are diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, and weight loss. Children are more frequently affected than adults. Various extra-intestinal manifestations have been reported, among which are arthritis and arthralgia. methods: A series of 10 children with arthralgia and cysts of giardia lamblia in feces seen during 13 years of private practice were presented. Ages ranged between 5 and 11 years, and 70% of the children are males. RESULTS: The joints involved in all cases were the knee and the ankle. No joint flogosis or changes in local temperature were observed. Other associated symptoms were abdominal pain (100%), abdominal distension (70%), flatulence (50%), less consistent stools (50%), anemia (30%), and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (60%). c-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor were negative in all cases. arthralgia disappeared after treatment with metronidazole when coproparasitoscopic analyses were negative. CONCLUSIONS: arthralgia associated with giardiasis in children is a rare entity, relatively benign, and leaves no sequelae.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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6/41. hip arthroscopy in the adolescent and pediatric athlete.

    The current literature offers only sparse reports of the use of hip arthroscopy in the pediatric patient injured during athletics. In contrast, the role of this technique in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple childhood hip conditions including pyarthrosis, legg-calve-perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, coxa vara, juvenile chronic arthritis, chondrolysis, and avascular necrosis is well described. The application of this relatively uncommon technique to the young athlete has only recently become more attractive. The ability to examine and treat traumatic intra-articular pathology with minimal morbidity and prompt recovery is mandated by the young age of these patients and their demanding activity levels. hip arthroscopists are now beginning to correlate preoperative physical exam findings and history with diagnosis and expectations for outcome. As our combined experience with this technique grows, the specific indications for its use in the young athlete become increasingly better defined. In pediatric and adolescent patients, the new onset of hip pain should warrant a high level of suspicion for the more common causes of pain such as infection, legg-calve-perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, or developmental dysplasia. When these have been evaluated, further differential diagnosis should include labral tears, loose bodies, synovitis, and chondral lesions. As this review begins to elucidate, these conditions are amenable to arthroscopic evaluation and treatment. At this time, the presence of reproducible mechanical symptoms after a twisting or axial loading injury during athletics should prompt the orthopaedic surgeon to consider arthroscopic examination of the hip if conservative therapy fails. Satisfying and reproducible results have been achieved when using hip arthroscopy within these parameters.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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7/41. HLA-B27 positive juvenile arthritis with cardiac involvement preceding sacroiliac joint changes.

    While cardiovascular disease develops in up to 50% of adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis, it is very uncommon in its juvenile counterpart. Regarding the early stage of the disease, before onset of sacroiliac joint changes, only two cases with aortic incompetence have been published while reports of mitral valve involvement are not available. A 13 year old boy is described with an HLA-B27 positive asymmetric oligoarthritis and enthesitis, without back pain or radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis. echocardiography showed an echogenic structure measuring 8 x 11 x 20 mm at the fibrous continuity between the aortic and mitral valves extending through a false tendon into an echogenic thickened posterior papillary muscle, causing a grade II aortic and grade I/II mitral regurgitation. Short term corticosteroid and long term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and disease modifying antirheumatic drug treatments efficiently controlled the symptoms. The cardiac findings remained unchanged during a follow up of 20 months. Careful cardiac evaluation appears to be mandatory even in these young patients.
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ranking = 0.15767208789071
keywords = arthritis
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8/41. Adductor myositis as a cause of childhood hip pain.

    Two cases of bacterial adductor myositis that presented as painful hips in boys aged 4 and 9 years are reported. Clinically, there was severe pain and a high pyrexia, a raised c-reactive protein and positive blood cultures but a negative hip ultrasound. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated changes throughout the adductor muscles in keeping with bacterial myositis. Both boys settled with intravenous antibiotic therapy. We propose that magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool in the assessment of infection around the hip and should be indicated when other investigations have excluded a septic arthritis but the child remains unwell.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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9/41. posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis.

    We present the case of a patient with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and an acute onset of total dysfunction of the posterior tibial tendon. On MRI, a rupture of the tendon was apparent. Intraoperatively, however, massive tenosynovitis with stricture of the tendon was identified as the cause of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. This case illustrates a pitfall in MRI imaging with potential diagnostic and therapeutic consequences.
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ranking = 0.15767208789071
keywords = arthritis
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10/41. Two-year follow-up study after human parvovirus B19 infection.

    BACKGROUND: Acute human parvovirus B19 (B19) infection induces systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like symptoms. It has been controversial whether B19 infection causes SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVES: This study prospectively investigated whether symptoms of B19 infection persisted for more than 2 years and whether persistent symptoms contributed to the development of SLE and RA. methods: In this prospective study, clinical findings were examined and laboratory examinations were performed in 42 adult patients 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 months after the first consultation. RESULTS: Most acute symptoms disappeared within 2 weeks. However, arthralgia continued for 2 months in 2 women, 6 months in 1 woman and more than 2 years in 1 woman with positive antinuclear antibody and hypocomplementemia. The clinical findings of the patient with persistent arthralgia did not fulfill the criteria for SLE and RA. CONCLUSION: The symptoms caused by B19 infection were transient in most cases but persisted in 1 case in our series.
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ranking = 0.031534417578143
keywords = arthritis
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