Cases reported "Arthralgia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/16. Uncommon causes of anterior knee pain: a case report of infrapatellar contracture syndrome.

    The uncommon causes of anterior knee pain should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a painful knee when treatment of common origins become ineffective. A case is presented in which the revised diagnosis of infrapatellar contracture syndrome was made after noting delayed progress in the rehabilitation of an active female patient with a presumed anterior horn medial meniscus tear and a contracted patellar tendon. The patient improved after the treatment program was augmented with closed manipulation under arthroscopy and infrapatellar injection of both corticosteroids and a local anesthetic. Infrapatellar contraction syndrome and other uncommon sources of anterior knee pain, including arthrofibrosis, Hoffa's syndrome, tibial collateral ligament bursitis, saphenous nerve palsy, isolated ganglions of the anterior cruciate ligament, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and knee tumors, are subsequently discussed. Delayed functional advancement in a rehabilitation program requires full reassessment of the patient's diagnosis and treatment plan. Alternative diagnoses of knee pain are not always of common origins. Ample knowledge of uncommon causes of anterior knee pain is necessary to form a full differential diagnosis in patients with challenging presentations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/16. Bilateral discoid medial menisci.

    SUMMARY: This article adds 2 more cases of bilateral discoid medial menisci to the previously reported 9 cases. The radiographs of the first case revealed bilateral cupping of the medial tibial plateaus and a small lytic lesion of the left distal medial femoral metaphysis. Beside the posteriorly unstable incomplete type discoid medial meniscus, the left knee had several associated arthroscopic findings: depression of the medial tibial plateau with exposed subchondral bone, anomalous insertion of the anterior horn of the discoid meniscus to the anterior cruciate ligament, a pathological medial plica, and longitudinal deep fissures in the trochlea. The second case was a complete type with peripheral horizontal cleavage tears. Following arthroscopic surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the contralateral knees were obtained in both cases to search for bilaterality. MRI revealed discoid medial menisci in the unoperated knees as well. The short-term results of arthroscopic meniscectomy may not be as satisfactory as those reported for normal menisci.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/16. Realignment of tibial deformity in Paget's disease. A case report.

    Paget's disease of bone is a relatively common condition which usually is asymptomatic. Furthermore, there is limited experience in surgical procedures, especially in realignment of severe skeletal deformities. Likewise, there are often relapses in tibial deformities treated with plates. We report a case of a severe tibial deformity treated with multiple osteotomies and stabilized with an unreamed medullary nail.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/16. Potential complication of bioabsorbable screw fixation for osteochondritis dissecans of the knee.

    The 3 cases presented describe loosening or failure of bioabsorbable screws in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). In case 1, a 17-year-old boy with OCD of the medial femoral condyle was treated with bioabsorbable screw fixation. Six months after surgery, the patient had an acute episode of pain with effusion. Arthroscopic examination revealed 2 of the 4 screws backed out, causing cartilage damage to the corresponding tibial plateau. The shafts of the remaining 2 screws had completely absorbed, leaving the unabsorbed screw heads as intra-articular loose bodies in the knee. Unpredictable and inconsistent degradation of the screws is believed to be the mechanism for screw back-out and cartilage damage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/16. A symptomatic cyclops lesion 4 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    The cyclops lesion is a fibrous nodule with central granulation tissue located anterolateral to the tibial tunnel after intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that has been shown to be a cause of failure to regain full extension in the early postoperative period. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had undergone arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon autograft 4 years prior to presentation. Following her reconstruction, she regained full range of motion and returned to collegiate cheerleading. At presentation, she complained of a gradual loss of full extension and joint-line pain with terminal extension. On examination, her graft was stable and she lacked 3 degrees of extension. magnetic resonance imaging documented a 1-cm mass of low signal intensity immediately anterior to the ACL graft within the intercondylar notch. At arthroscopy, a large amount of thick, immobile scar tissue was found immediately anterior to the ACL, consistent with a cyclops lesion. The lesion was debrided and the patient did well postoperatively. patients who present with delayed-onset loss of extension after ACL reconstruction should undergo careful evaluation including radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. If a cyclops lesion is diagnosed, arthroscopic resection should be undertaken.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/16. Giving way event during a combined stepping and crossover cutting task in an individual with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case study. OBJECTIVE: To compare knee kinematics and moments of nongiving way trials to a giving way trial during a combined stepping and crossover cutting activity. BACKGROUND: The knee kinematics and moments associated with giving way episodes suggest motor control strategies that lead to instability and recovery of stability during movement. methods AND MEASURES: A 27-year-old woman with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency reported giving way while performing a combined stepping and crossover cutting activity. A motion analysis system recorded motion of the pelvis, femur, tibia, and foot using 3 infrared emitting diodes placed on each segment at 60 Hz. Force plate recordings at 300 Hz were combined with limb inertial properties and position data to estimate net knee joint moments. The stance time, foot progression angle, and cutting angle were also included to evaluate performance between trials. RESULTS: Knee internal rotation during the giving way trial increased 3.2 degrees at 54% of stance relative to the nongiving way trials. Knee flexion during the giving way trial increased to 33.1 degrees at 66% of stance, and the knee moment switched from a nominal flexor moment to a knee extensor moment at 64% of stance. The knee abductor moment and external rotation moment during the giving way trial deviated in early stance. CONCLUSIONS: The observed response to the giving way event suggests that increasing knee flexion may enhance knee stability for this subject. The transverse and frontal plane moments appear important in contributing to the giving way event. Further research that assists clinicians in understanding how interventions can impact control of movements in these planes is necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/16. posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis.

    We present the case of a patient with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and an acute onset of total dysfunction of the posterior tibial tendon. On MRI, a rupture of the tendon was apparent. Intraoperatively, however, massive tenosynovitis with stricture of the tendon was identified as the cause of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. This case illustrates a pitfall in MRI imaging with potential diagnostic and therapeutic consequences.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/16. brucella osteomyelitis of the proximal tibia: a case report.

    brucellosis is a disease of domestic and wild animals that is transmittable to humans. Although endemic in some parts of the world, brucellosis is an uncommon human pathogen in the united states. The clinical presentation of brucellosis is nonspecific, and brucella osteomyelitis can produce lytic lesions on radiographs that resemble neoplasm. diagnosis can therefore be difficult unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. We present a case of brucella osteomyelitis of the proximal tibia that demonstrates these features.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/16. Computed tomography-guided and arthroscopically controlled en bloc retrograde resection of a juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the tibial plateau.

    Osteoid osteoma represents approximately 10% to 11% of all the benign bone tumors. The localization at the articular and juxta-articular level of the knee is an atypical picture that causes both diagnostic and therapeutic problems. We present the case of an osteoid osteoma of the lateral tibial plateau just beneath the joint level. The lesion was removed by a rear-entry computed tomography (CT)-guided drill under arthroscopic control and the bony defect filled with bone graft harvested from the proximal tibial metaphysis. Postoperative CT scans at 3 months, and 1 and 2 years were performed. The result of the kneeling test to evaluate donor-site morbidity 1 year after the surgery was negative. There were no immediate or delayed complications. Currently (2 years postoperatively), the patient has no pain and has gone back to his normal active daily lifestyle and routines. The follow-up CT scan 2 years after surgery showed complete excision of the lesion and perfect positioning of the bone graft. This new approach/technique enabled us to avoid damaging the proximal structures, to examine the lesion, and to fill the bony defect. Moreover, as shown by CT scan at follow-up, iatrogenic lesions to the cartilage of the tibial plateau were not reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/16. Popliteus tendon tenosynovitis.

    This case report highlights an unusual cause of anterolateral knee pain. The popliteus muscle arises from three origins--that is, the lateral femoral condyle, the fibula head, and the lateral meniscus--and inserts into the proximal tibia above the soleal line. It may be subjected to a number of pathologies including tenosynovitis, acute calcific tendonitis, rupture, and even avulsion. In this case, the diagnosis of popliteus tendon tenosynovitis was not made from magnetic resonance imaging findings, but was confirmed and successfully treated during arthroscopic examination.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arthralgia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.