Cases reported "Arthritis, Infectious"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/15. arthritis due to mycobacterium fortuitum.

    mycobacterium fortuitum is classified as a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) according to the Runyon classification. RGM are increasingly being recognized as human pathogens. Joint infection due to M. fortuitum is a rare, but serious disease. This report describes a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and septic arthritis of the knee due to M. fortuitum in a previously normal joint with no history of surgery or intra-articular injections.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/15. Septic arthritis caused by a gram-negative bacterium representing a new species related to the bordetella-Alcaligenes complex.

    A knee-joint exudate culture yielded on two occasions a gram-negative bacterium. Regular methods for speciation did not provide an identification. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. The unknown isolate, CCUG 36768, was subjected to further investigation, including 16S rDNA sequencing, protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis, and various biochemical tests, in order to produce a species identification. The 1469 bp-long 16S rDNA sequence did not reveal identity with any known species sequence. CCUG 36768 clustered in a group of species, including Alcaligenes defragrans, Denitrobacter permanens, taylorella equigenitalis, alcaligenes faecalis, and four strains of Alcaligenes species without a specific species name. bordetella species also showed a high degree of similarity with CCUG 36768. Protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis and computer-assisted analysis of biochemical profiles indicated similarity with bordetella-Alcaligenes species, often close to B. holmesii and B. avium. API 20 NE indicated the profile of moraxella species of poor identity. It is concluded that CCUG 36768 represents a new bacterial species of pathogenic potential in humans. It is related to the bordetella-Alcaligenes group. Powerful new methods for speciation are available and it is recommended that unknown isolates from normally sterile sites be submitted for further analysis. Several isolates are required for the definition of new species.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.01508819025922
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/15. Successful treatment of mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis and arthritis in a non-immunocompromised child.

    In non-immunocompromised children, infections with mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are rare, except for cervical lymphadenitis. We report here a 34-month-old boy who developed osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to MAC. No findings could be revealed for immunodeficiency. He was treated successfully for 12 months with combined therapy consisting of clarithromycin, rifabutin and protionamid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5151936970331
keywords = mycobacterium avium, mycobacterium, avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/15. Mycobacterium avium arthritis with extra-articular abscess in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    A case of Mycobacterium avium arthritis in a 39-year-old female patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was reported. An extra-articular abscess had formed outside the knee joint and extended down the calf. A culture was taken of the abscess and synovial fluid disclosed Mycobacterium avium. This was resistant to most anti-tuberculosis agents. A combination of anti-tuberculosis drugs followed a total resection of the abscess. We concluded that M avium septic arthritis could insidiously develop into an extra-articular abscess. A combination of anti-tuberculosis drugs with a total resection of the abscess was an effective treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10561733181454
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/15. AIDS-related ankle arthropathy: mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.

    We present a case of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) infection of the ankle joint in a patient with hiv infection. The patient presented with a painful, destructive arthropathy of the ankle. Initial microbiological studies were negative but infection with MAI was later identified from biopsies taken during hindfoot fusion. Antibiotic triple therapy was given and the patient remains pain-free without evidence of active infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case of MAI infection of the ankle reported in the literature. A high index of suspicion of (atypical) Mycobacterial infection should be maintained in patients with hiv infection presenting with an indolent but destructive arthropathy of the ankle joint.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.075440951296098
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/15. mycobacterium marinum arthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis.

    mycobacterium marinum is an atypical mycobacterium found in salt and fresh water. M. marinum infection occurs following skin trauma in fresh or salt water and usually presents as a localized granuloma or sporotrichotic lymphangitis. It rarely affects the musculoskeletal system. We describe a patient who presented with subcutaneous nodules and an inflammatory arthritis that was thought to be rheumatoid arthritis, and was treated as such with corticosteroids, methotrexate, and anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy, with worsening of his arthritis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/15. Case report 653: arthritis of the wrist due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare.

    We present a case of arthritis of the wrist in an elderly man due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Prior steroid injections and a surgical procedure on the affected wrist were predisposing risk factors for subsequent mycobacterial involvement of the skeleton. Radiographs demonstrated findings characteristic of tuberculous arthritis: particularly, osteopenia with marginal erosions and diffuse lytic lesions involving the carpals, proximal metacarpals, and distal ends of the radius and ulna. MR scans showed soft-tissue involvement and extensive marrow replacement consistent with infection. It is to be reemphasized that the clinical and radiological findings in this case are very often indistinguishable from TB. The diagnosis depends on the results of tissue culture. Since radiologists are likely to be involved increasingly in interpreting images of immunocompromised patients afflicted with a variety of both typical and atypical infections, it is important occasionally to report rare infections such as that described herein.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.075440951296098
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/15. Mixed gonococcal and mycobacterial sepsis of the wrist.

    Mycobacterial infections of the hand and wrist are rare. Concurrent infection of a joint by more than one organism is also unusual. A 25-year-old man developed wrist sepsis caused by neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycobacterium avium intracellularis. The infection was successfully treated by wrist drainage, carpal debridement, and intravenous antibiotics. Secondary carpal reconstruction was accomplished by delayed bone grafting and internal fixation to preserve radiocarpal motion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.01508819025922
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/15. Septic arthritis associated with mycobacterium avium: a case report and literature review.

    A 58 year old man, with systemic lupus erythematosus, developed septic arthritis due to an atypical mycobacterium, M. avium. The patient's course, as well as 46 cases reviewed from the literature, illustrates the insidious nature of atypical mycobacterial infections. Septic arthritis or peri-arthritis was generally not suspected at initial evaluation, leading or at least 40% of patients receiving intra-articular steroids for non-specific reasons. A diagnosis was eventually obtained in 85% of cases by surgical biopsy and culture. In only15% was a diagnosis made by culture of synovial or bursal fluid. The relative in vitro resistance of "atypicals" to antituberculous drugs and the frequent necessity for surgery to make a diagnosis, led to surgery consituting partial or total therapy in 89% of cases. Whether patients were treated with surgery alone, surgery plus antituberculous drugs, or antituberculous drugs alone, clinical improvement generally occured. Because most patients had limited follow-up and because atypical mycobacterial infections often relapse, none of the cases reviewed should be considered "cures", be but rather instances of clinically inactive disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.2272431478857
keywords = mycobacterium avium, mycobacterium, avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/15. mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in an immunocompetent host.

    We describe a case of mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in an immunocompetent man. Infection was derived from a chainsaw injury sustained on the lateral aspect of the ankle 13 years earlier, and had spread through the bone, joint and soft tissue emerging at the medial aspect. This was successfully treated with surgical debridement, drainage, arthrodesis and 18 months of chemotherapy consisting of clarithromycin, rifampicin, ethambutol, and ciprofloxacin with an initial 2 weeks of amikacin. Infections with this organisms are generally associated with immunocompromised states, particularly advanced AIDS. However, our patient illustrates that atypical mycobacterial infections must also be considered in immunocompetent patients who have a prolonged clinical course and an appropriate potential source of infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.075440951296098
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arthritis, Infectious'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.