Cases reported "Arthritis, Infectious"

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1/69. arthritis due to mycobacterium fortuitum.

    mycobacterium fortuitum is classified as a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) according to the Runyon classification. RGM are increasingly being recognized as human pathogens. Joint infection due to M. fortuitum is a rare, but serious disease. This report describes a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and septic arthritis of the knee due to M. fortuitum in a previously normal joint with no history of surgery or intra-articular injections.
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ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
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2/69. Successful lipid-complexed amphotericin b treatment of Candida arthritis in a lymphoma patient.

    Fungal arthritis is uncommon but has been increasingly diagnosed over recent years, particularly in patients with immunodeficiency due for instance to hematological malignancies. candida albicans is the most frequent causative agent, and the knee is the joint most often involved. amphotericin b is the drug of choice, but is associated with significant toxicity. Recently developed lipid formulations of amphotericin b have been found as effective and less toxic than the conventional formulation. We report a new case of Candida arthritis that occurred after chemotherapy for nonHodgkin's lymphoma and was successfully treated with lipid-complexed amphotericin b.
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ranking = 0.00014447962747524
keywords = complex
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3/69. Septic arthritis caused by a gram-negative bacterium representing a new species related to the bordetella-Alcaligenes complex.

    A knee-joint exudate culture yielded on two occasions a gram-negative bacterium. Regular methods for speciation did not provide an identification. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. The unknown isolate, CCUG 36768, was subjected to further investigation, including 16S rDNA sequencing, protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis, and various biochemical tests, in order to produce a species identification. The 1469 bp-long 16S rDNA sequence did not reveal identity with any known species sequence. CCUG 36768 clustered in a group of species, including Alcaligenes defragrans, Denitrobacter permanens, taylorella equigenitalis, alcaligenes faecalis, and four strains of Alcaligenes species without a specific species name. bordetella species also showed a high degree of similarity with CCUG 36768. Protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis and computer-assisted analysis of biochemical profiles indicated similarity with bordetella-Alcaligenes species, often close to B. holmesii and B. avium. API 20 NE indicated the profile of moraxella species of poor identity. It is concluded that CCUG 36768 represents a new bacterial species of pathogenic potential in humans. It is related to the bordetella-Alcaligenes group. Powerful new methods for speciation are available and it is recommended that unknown isolates from normally sterile sites be submitted for further analysis. Several isolates are required for the definition of new species.
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ranking = 0.0010586187259205
keywords = avium, complex
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4/69. Septic arthritis due to actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a gram-negative aerobic bacillus of the family Parvobacteriaceae which is a normal inhabitant of the oral flora, is a rare cause of human infection. We report a case of septic arthritis caused by this organism in an uncompromised child.
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ranking = 0.0048028429250883
keywords = bacillus
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5/69. Successful treatment of mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis and arthritis in a non-immunocompromised child.

    In non-immunocompromised children, infections with mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are rare, except for cervical lymphadenitis. We report here a 34-month-old boy who developed osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to MAC. No findings could be revealed for immunodeficiency. He was treated successfully for 12 months with combined therapy consisting of clarithromycin, rifabutin and protionamid.
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ranking = 1.0947308250374
keywords = mycobacterium, mycobacterium avium, avium, complex
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6/69. Septic arthritis of the hip secondary to rat bite fever: a case report.

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection typically caused by streptobacillus moniliformis. The mode of transmission is most commonly through a bite or scratch from an infected rat. This disease is characterized by polyarthritis, fever, and a delayed onset erythematous maculopapular rash of the extremities. The authors report a case of rat bite fever, which led to septic arthritis of the hip. To the authors' knowledge, the complication of hip sepsis requiring an arthrotomy has not been reported in the literature. The orthopaedist should be aware of not only streptobacillus moniliformis, but also of other zoonotic organisms, which potentially can cause septic arthritis and warrant treatment with specific antibiotics.
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ranking = 0.0016009476416961
keywords = bacillus
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7/69. Chronic destructive oligoarthritis associated with propionibacterium acnes in a female patient with acne vulgaris: septic-reactive arthritis?

    propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic bacillus implicated in certain chronic arthritides. This report describes an HLA-B27 17-year-old woman with acne vulgaris who presented with rapidly destructive arthritis in the left shoulder as well as an evolving left subclavicular adenopathy. One year later, arthritis was detected in the left knee; the inflammatory synovial fluid was sterile. growth of P acnes was observed in cultures of the shoulder synovium and lymph nodes, but polymerase chain reaction was negative for borrelia, chlamydia, and ureaplasma dna. Three months of treatment with amoxicillin and rifampicin led to clinical disappearance of the oligoarthritis, but arthritis recurred in the left knee after discontinuation of therapy. On biopsy, bacteria were undetectable in the knee synovium, but chronic arthritis was evident histologically. Antibiotics were reintroduced for 12 months and were again effective against the clinical symptoms. Although the asymmetry, histologic features, arthritis-acne association, and genetic predisposition of this chronic destructive oligoarthritis would seem to indicate a reactive arthropathy, the isolation of P acnes from 2 distinct specimens prompted us to propose calling this a case of septic-reactive arthritis, which is further supported by the absence of progression after antibiotic therapy and the persistence of the rheumatism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the efficacy of prolonged antibiotic therapy on the joint manifestations of chronic rheumatism associated with acne.
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ranking = 0.00080047382084804
keywords = bacillus
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8/69. A rare and serious consequence of a rat bite.

    Contact with rat saliva or faeces can lead to infection with streptobacillus moniliformis and the condition known as 'rat bite fever'. We report a case of septic arthritis of the hip due to this organism following a bite on the finger of a 14-year-old boy from a rat for sale in a pet shop. The case was successfully treated by arthrotomy, drainage and joint lavage followed by administration of penicillin. Septic arthritis of the hip due to S. moniliformis has not been previously described and this case highlights a possible danger of keeping rats as pets.
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ranking = 0.00080047382084804
keywords = bacillus
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9/69. endocarditis by lactobacillus rhamnosus due to yogurt ingestion?

    A young man who ate large quantities of probiotic yogurt developed endocarditis and septic arthritis caused by lactobacillus rhamnosus. The pathogenic isolate could not be distinguished from the yogurt microflora using methods routinely used in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Only by using more appropriate methodology, including PCR, the pathogen could be distinguished from the yogurt isolate.
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ranking = 0.0040023691042402
keywords = bacillus
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10/69. A fatal case of vibrio vulnificus presenting as septic arthritis.

    vibrio vulnificus is an invasive gram-negative bacillus that may cause necrotizing cellulitis, bacteremia, and/or sepsis. Although V vulnificus infection is uncommon, it is frequently fatal and is usually attributed to ingestion of raw shellfish or traumatic exposure to a marine environment; patients are also often found to have a hepatic disorder (cirrhosis, alcohol abuse, or hemochromatosis) or an immunocompromised health status, and most commonly present with septicemia or a wound infection. We describe a patient who presented with septic arthritis as the first clinical manifestation of a V vulnificus infection. The organism was subsequently identified in a synovial fluid aspirate.
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ranking = 0.00080047382084804
keywords = bacillus
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