Cases reported "Arthritis, Rheumatoid"

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11/180. Development of rheumatoid arthritis in a patient with pernicious anemia: case report.

    Very few cases of rheumatoid arthritis combined with pernicious anemia have been reported in the world literature and none in the Chinese literature. A 62-year-old female initially presented with anemia. Pernicious anemia was diagnosed by characteristic blood and bone marrow morphology. Laboratory data showed a deficiency of vitamin B12 and positive anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies. Her anemia improved after vitamin B12 therapy. Painful swelling of multiple joints developed 6 years later. The clinical presentation supported a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. We report herein a rare case of rheumatoid arthritis and pernicious anemia in the same ethnic Chinese patient. We also review the literature and discuss a possible association between a non-organ-specific autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and an organ-specific autoimmune disease, pernicious anemia.
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12/180. Rapid improvement of osteomalacia by treatment in a case with sjogren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and renal tubular acidosis type 1.

    We present here a case of sjogren's syndrome (SjS) with osteomalacia based on renal tubular acidosis type 1 (RTA-1). A 53-year-old woman, diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at the age of 33, was admitted to our hospital because of sicca complex, fatigability and worsening general aching. The activity of RA had been low, but it was complicated by SjS, RTA-1 and remarkable osteomalacia. acidosis was corrected by alkali supplement therapy. By treatment with a regimen consisting of alfacalcidol, calcium L-aspartate, elcatonin and ipriflavone, her bone mineral density (BMD) was remarkably improved within months and the generalized aching gradually diminished.
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13/180. Bilateral tibia and fibula fractures in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    A 52-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis treated with low-dose steroids developed bilateral distal tibia and fibula fractures over a 15-month period. Her bone density was within osteopenic levels. Such fractures are an unusual but increasingly recognised complication of rheumatoid disease and its treatment, although there is often diagnostic delay. Bilateral fractures are particularly rare. A high level of clinical suspicion is required for early diagnosis.
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14/180. The 3-week sulphasalazine syndrome strikes again.

    A 34-year-old lady developed a constellation of dermatitis, fever, lymphadenopathy and hepatitis, beginning on the 17th day of a course of oral sulphasalazine for sero-negative rheumatoid arthritis. Cervical and inguinal lymph node biopsies showed the features of severe necrotising lymphadenitis, associated with erythrophagocytosis and prominent eosinophilic infiltrates, without viral inclusion bodies, suggestive of an adverse drug reaction.A week later, fulminant drug-induced hepatitis, associated with the presence of anti-nuclear autoantibodies (but not with other markers of autoimmunity), and accompanied by multi-organ failure and sepsis, supervened. She subsequently died some 5 weeks after the commencement of her drug therapy.Post-mortem examination showed evidence of massive hepatocellular necrosis, acute hypersensitivity myocarditis, focal acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis and extensive bone marrow necrosis, with no evidence of malignancy. It is thought that the clinico-pathological features and chronology of this case bore the hallmarks of the so-called "3-week sulphasalazine syndrome", a rare, but often fatal, immunoallergic reaction to sulphasalazine.
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15/180. Periprosthetic tibial fractures after cementless low contact stress total knee arthroplasty.

    periprosthetic fractures are a recognized complication of total knee arthroplasty. Fractures may occur intraoperatively or postoperatively, and risk factors have been identified that may predispose an individual to such a complication. We report 7 cases of periprosthetic tibial fractures after low contact stress total knee arthroplasty, a complication encountered by the senior author (D.E.B.) only after a change in practice from a cemented implant to a cementless one. In light of this previously unreported complication in our unit, we attempted to identify common features within this group of patients that may have contributed to fracture occurrence. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significant (P<.005) risk of periprosthetic tibial fracture in patients with a preoperative neutral or valgus knee. Age, gender, and diagnosis did not appear to increase the risk of fracture significantly. All patients displayed evidence of reduced bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck regions on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning. patients with a preoperative neutral or valgus knee and local evidence of osteopenia represent a high-risk group, in whom particular care in alignment should be taken. In this group, it may be preferable to have the tibial component inserted with cement fixation.
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16/180. Unusual morphology in a case of large granular cell leukemia.

    Large granular lymphocyte proliferative status represents a group of clonal and nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders of natural killer (NK) or T-cell lineages with common morphological features. Cellular differences may sustain the clinical polymorphism observed in these disorders. Here we report a case of large granular lymphocyte disease unusually expressing CD4 CD8 clonal T cells and atypical cell morphology in bone marrow.
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17/180. Destructive monarthritis and granulomatous synovitis as the presenting manifestations of Crohn's disease.

    A twenty-two-year-old woman and a fourteen-year-old boy with Crohn's disease presented with progressive monarticular arthritis with radiologic evidence of altered articular cartilage and subchondral bone. In one individual, granulomatous inflammation of the synovium was demonstrated. Intestinal symptoms were not prominent. In both individuals, the development of the monarthritis led to the discovery of the underlying inflammatory bowel disease.
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18/180. Spontaneous external auditory canal cholesteatoma complicated by rheumatoid arthritis--case report and review of the literature.

    A 63-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis sought medical assistance for dull and chronic pain in her left ear two and half years after her initial diagnostic examination. Otoscopic examination revealed that the posteroinferior wall of the bony external ear canal was eroded and that the small cavity was filled with squamous debris. The condition was diagnosed as external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC). The existence of EACC might suggest complications of bone disease, aging cerumen gland, or a low migratory rate of the epithelium.
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19/180. Large subarticular cysts (geodes) adjacent to the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis are described, who developed very large bone cysts or geodes adjacent to the knee-joint. The existence of cysts adjacent to joints involved by rheumatoid arthritis is well recognised, but the occurrence of very large cysts is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulties. Possible aetiological factors are discussed.
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20/180. Filling of segmental bone defects in revision knee arthroplasty using morsellized bone grafts contained within a metal mesh.

    For revision knee surgery with uncontained tibial bone defects, the authors report the containment of compacted morsellized allograft using metal-wire mesh, followed by implantation of a cemented total knee prosthesis. This method is comparable to the "impaction grafting technique" described for revision hip surgery and could be an alternative to metal wedges, augmented components, custom-made implants, polymethyl-methacrylate or structural bone grafts to solve some problems of cavitary and segmental bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.
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