Cases reported "Arthritis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/30. Klinefelter's syndrome accompanied by mixed connective tissue disease and diabetes mellitus.

    We report a rare case of Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), diabetes mellitus (DM) and several endocrine disorders. A 57-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and tapering fingers with Raynaud's phenomenon on admission. In addition to a karyotype of 47, XXY, a marked restrictive change in respiratory functional test, a myogenic pattern in electromyogram, the positive tests for anti-RNP antibody indicated that this was a case of KS complicated with MCTD. The patients also presented DM with insulin resistance, hyperprolactinemia, slight primary hypothyroidism and hypoadrenocorticism. The mechanism for these coincidences remains to be elucidated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/30. Erosive polyarthritis in Crohn's disease. Report of a case.

    Erosive polyarthritis in Crohn's disease is rare and raises diagnostic and pathophysiological problems. A case with destructive lesions of the shoulders and hips is reported in a 43-year-old woman with a 26-year history of Crohn's disease. ankylosis of the spine and hips, motion range limitation of the shoulders and wrists, and boutonniere deformity of the third finger of the right hand were present. Tests were negative for rheumatoid factor and the hla-b27 antigen. Plain radiographs showed a triple rail pattern at the spine; synostosis of the hips; and destructive lesions of the shoulders, wrists, tarsal bones, and third proximal interphalangeal joint of the right hand. Glucocorticoid therapy was effective in suppressing the bowel symptom flares but only partially improved the joint symptoms, whose treatment relied mainly on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and rehabilitation therapy. Erosive arthritis in Crohn's disease is frequently monoarticular, with the hip being the most common target. It can complicate a spondylarthropathy or reveal granulomatous synovitis. Polyarticular forms pose difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and add to the disability caused by the bowel disease. The potential role of genetic factors remains to be studied.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/30. Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. An unusual cause of arthritis in childhood.

    Although an uncommon occurrence in childhood, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy secondary to tumors- most commonly to osteogenic sarcoma with pulmonary metastasis-may cause severe join pain and swelling. The syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute arthritis in childhood
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 870.34196154004
keywords = osteoarthropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/30. Arthropathy associated with anti-Jo-1 antibody.

    Anti-Jo-1 antibody is associated with an overlap syndrome usually described as the association of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, pulmonary fibrosis and polyarthritis. We report three observations illustrating different aspects of arthropathy associated with anti-Jo-1 antibody. Two patients presented with a deforming and erosive arthritis affecting the hands, periarticular calcifications and dislocation of the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the thumb. The third patient, who had a short disease course, presented only with a mild non-erosive polyarthritis of both hands, metacarpophalangeal joint narrowing and periarticular calcifications. All the patients had interstitial pulmonary syndrome. Only two of them had myositis. An arthropathy characterized by erosive arthritis of the fingers, with dislocation of the IP joint of the thumb and periarticular calcifications, seems to be specifically associated with anti-Jo-1 antibody.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/30. Palmar fasciitis and arthritis: association with endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    A 74-year-old woman was referred because of rheumatic symptoms consisting of pain, swelling of the hands, contracture and flexion of the fingers and severe palmar erythrosis. One year earlier she had undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) for uterine adenocarcinoma. A paraneoplastic syndrome with palmar fasciitis and arthritis was then suspected and an evolutive peritoneal carcinomatosis was confirmed by abdominal CT scan. The patient was first treated with hormonal therapy (progestagen) and then with chemotherapy. This, associated with calcitonin, corticosteroids and physiotherapy, allowed a temporary recovery, but the patient died 10 months later from progressive peritoneal carcinomatosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/30. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: a rare cause of erosive arthropathy of the distal interphalangeal finger joints.

    BACKGROUND: Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare systemic disease, presenting with typical skin abnormalities and erosive polyarthritis, which is often associated with malignancy. CASE REPORT: A case of MRH arthropathy, in which the typical nodular skin manifestation of the disease was absent, is described in a patient with a past history of breast cancer and no evidence of recurrent or new malignancy. RESULTS: Careful clinical and roentgenological evaluation disclosed important clues to differentiate this condition from other more common distal interphalangeal arthritides--namely, osteoarthritis and its "erosive" variant, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, tophaceous gout, dialysis related hand arthropathy, and from the rarer fibroblastic rheumatism, all of which can be mimicked by MRH. Histopathology showed the characteristic histiocytic and multinucleated giant cell infiltrate with ground glass cytoplasm, and immunohistochemical analysis showed markers evocative of a monocyte/macrophage origin of MRH.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/30. An unknown autoinflammatory syndrome associated with short stature and dysmorphic features in a young boy.

    A young boy from nonconsanguineous Palestinian parents presented with short stature, motor developmental delay, wide nasal bridge, bilateral periorbital edema, everted lower lip, brachydactyly, large interphalangeal articulations, drumstick extremities of the fingers, bilateral simian crease, clinodactyly of the 5th fingers, painful joints, subcutaneous nodules all over his body and recurrent episodes of fever of unknown origin. Differential diagnoses such as the hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), the chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, and the newly recognized nodulosis, arthropathy, and osteolysis (NAO) syndrome are discussed. This syndrome may not have been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/30. CIAS1 mutation in a patient with overlap between Muckle-Wells and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndromes.

    The Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder belonging to the group of hereditary fever syndromes. The chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology with neonatal onset. They are considered as two different entities. We report the case of a 36-year-old man suffering since birth from a nonpruritic generalized urticaria, with inflammatory flares, joint manifestations and progressive deafness requiring a bilateral hearing aid. An initial diagnosis of Muckle-Wells syndrome was made. However, the patient had an unusual clinical presentation with slightly dysmorphic facial appearance, clubbing of the fingers, mild mental retardation and papilledema. After a genetic advice, a diagnosis of CINCA syndrome was made. Search for mutations in the CIAS1 gene revealed a new mutation in a heterozygous state. This case report really raises the question of a link between these two inflammatory diseases. Further studies are needed to confirm the involvement of mutations of the CIAS1 gene in CINCA syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/30. Recurrent cutaneous erythralgia and arthralgia.

    Two cases are reported of Vietnamese men who presented in young adult life with recurrent, painful, erythematous patches (which we have termed "erythralgia") over and adjacent to joints and accompanied by marked constitutional symptoms of malaise and lethargy, arthralgia and in one patient, fever. In the other, from the onset of the disease there were nodules over the bony prominences and in the interphalangeal regions of the fingers. The duration of the disease was over 12 years, the duration of each episode without therapy was one week and the interval between episodes was one to two weeks. In addition the patients showed a raised ESR and peripheral neutrophil leucocytosis of over 70%. There was a rapid response, within hours, to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Skin biopsies taken at varying stages of the disease episode failed to demonstrate neutrophils thereby failing to satisfy one major criterion of Sweet's syndrome. Direct immunofluorescence studies were negative. biopsy of the nodules did not show rheumatoid pathology. The serum rheumatoid factor was negative. Investigations failed to demonstrate any recognised pattern of cutaneous or rheumatologic disease; infections such as borreliosis were excluded. Both patients showed evidence of past hepatitis b infection. As recurrent painful cutaneous erythema is an uncommon phenomenon in dermatology except where the patient is suffering from recurrent cellulitis of the lower limbs, the patients reported here exhibit a pattern of disease not previously described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/30. Palmar fascial thickening and contractures of fingers resembling arthritis--a paraneoplastic symptom?

    A 59-year-old women presented with contractures of the fingers of both hands 11 months before a diagnosis of an ovarian carcinoma with paraaortic lymph node metastases was made. We suggest that the contractures, which were associated with palmar fascial thickening and which clinically resembled arthritis, might have been a paraneoplastic sign.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = finger
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arthritis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.