Cases reported "Asbestosis"

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11/67. occupational exposure to asbestos and urinary bladder cancer.

    By the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry the amount (mean value mean = 191 /- 94 fibers/mg of tissue) and the type (chrysotile and tremolite) of asbestos fibers have been determined in tissue samples of four bladder cancer patients affected by pulmonary asbestosis, working in the same plant producing asbestos-cement pipes and boards. Similar measurements were carried out on samples of bladder cancers of eight control patients not professionally exposed to asbestos. Only five of them also revealed chrysotile fibers (mean = 151 /- 196 fibers/mg of tissue). The paucity of the study and control cases and the small quantitative difference between them regarding the presence of infraneoplastic asbestos fibers does not consent us to hypothesize a causal relationship between tumor and occupational exposure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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12/67. Asbestos-related pleural thickenings in Japanese sake brewers.

    Asbestos was long used as an additive material for the filtration of many kinds of alcoholic beverages. There has been, however, only one case report of a distiller in italy showing pleural thickenings and lung parenchymal fibrosis due to exposure to asbestos. We report a retired Japanese sake brewer who showed bilateral calcified pleural plaques on chest X-ray films. x-ray diffraction analysis and energy disperse X-ray microanalysis demonstrated the additive material used for sake filtration to be almost pure chrysotile. Furthermore, 17 cases showing probably asbestos-related pleural thickenings were found on examination of 235 chest X-ray films of male workers at different sake breweries. These findings indicate that Japanese sake brewers should be listed as workers at possible risk of asbestos-related health problems.
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ranking = 0.0045209086872705
keywords = exposure
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13/67. Oxalate deposition on asbestos bodies.

    We report on a deposition of oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos demonstrated in 3 patients. We investigated the mechanism and possible significance of this deposition by testing the hypothesis that oxalate generated through nonenzymatic oxidation of ascorbate by asbestos-associated iron accounts for the deposition of the crystal on a ferruginous body. Crocidolite asbestos (1000 microg/mL) was incubated with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C. The dependence of oxalate generation on iron-catalyzed oxidant production was tested with the both the metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylthiourea. Incubation of crocidolite, H(2)O(2), and ascorbate in vitro generated approximately 42 nmol of oxalate in 24 hours. Oxalate generation was diminished significantly by the inclusion of either deferoxamine or dimethylthiourea in the reaction mixture. Incubation of asbestos bodies and uncoated fibers isolated from human lung with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C resulted in the generation of numerous oxalate crystals. We conclude that iron-catalyzed production of oxalate from ascorbate can account for the deposition of this crystal on ferruginous bodies.
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ranking = 0.98191636525092
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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14/67. Peritoneal mesothelioma after environmental asbestos exposure.

    mesothelioma are primary malignant neoplasms of the serous membranes. They usually involve the pleura and rarely the pericardium, the peritoneum and the tunica vaginalis testis. About 90% are associated with exposure to asbestos. The exposure is generally occupational, an environmental inhalation of asbestos and asbestiform fibers in areas in turkey has been observed and presents a major health problem. This report of a patient from Anatolia with peritoneal mesothelioma after environmental exposure outlines the importance of considering this pathology in the differential diagnosis of a Turkish patient presenting with ascites.
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ranking = 0.031646360810893
keywords = exposure
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15/67. Asbestos exposure and psychic injury--a review of 48 claims.

    Asbestos exposure has been a common occupational risk resulting in much litigation. Where pulmonary dysfunction has been minimal or even absent, psychic injury has been made an element in claimed damages. Analysis of psychiatric and psychologic claims in 48 cases reveals that diagnoses often do not conform to professional standards, are based on insufficient data sampling, lack adequate overall history as well as medical history, and do not comport with the standard of probability usually required for litigation. The group studied was elderly (mean age--62.6), mostly retired (71%), with some significant medical illnesses (18% on medical retirement). None were retired for pulmonary reasons. As expected, conflict in opinion between the opposing professional medical participants was frequent. Commonly the patients did not substantiate the complaints reported in the medico-legal reports; some ridiculed statements made on their behalf. Many psychological reports reflected simplistic or erroneous concepts of medicine or ignored relevant medical data. This study indicates that in this group claims of psychic injury due to asbestos exposure have little justification and supports the view that the current system of utilization of expert opinions is not reliable or in conformity with reasonable professional standards. Correspondingly, these claims did not result in augmented awards.
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ranking = 0.027125452123623
keywords = exposure
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16/67. Lymphocyte-macrophage alveolitis in nonsmoking individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos.

    A disordered immunologic activity has been observed in humans and animal models of asbestosis and silicosis. To characterize the lung immunologic response following long-term occupational exposure to asbestos, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on 28 nonsmoking individuals. Increased BAL lymphocytes were observed in one third. lung lymphocytes were predominantly of the CD4 helper-inducer subtype with increased CD4 /CD8 ratio and increased surface expression of DR antigen consistent with the activation phenotype. Histologic evaluation of lung tissue from two individuals with lymphocytic-macrophage alveolitis and asbestos exposure revealed an infiltration of alveolar walls with chronic inflammatory mononuclear cells (lymphocytes). Interferon gamma was spontaneously released by BAL cells from 19 (76 percent) of 25 of the individuals with asbestos exposure and only one of ten normal controls. The release of interferon gamma by BAL cells could be further stimulated with concanavalin a and suppressed by cyclosporine. Although asbestosis is characterized by a predominant alveolar macrophage alveolitis, there is a subgroup with lymphocytic alveolitis and activated lymphocytes participating in the inflammatory response, especially in those without respiratory impairment early in the course of the disease process.
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ranking = 0.99095818262546
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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17/67. idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in asbestos-exposed workers.

    Diffuse interstitial lung disease in asbestos-exposed workers is presumed to represent asbestosis. Among 176 asbestos-exposed persons for whom lung tissue was available, we found nine with clinical features consistent with asbestosis, but histologic sections failed to demonstrate asbestos bodies, the usual requirement for pathologic diagnosis of asbestosis (Group I). These nine were compared by analytic electron microscopy with nine persons with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (Group II), and with nine persons with all the criteria of asbestosis (Group III). The three groups did not differ significantly with respect to lung burden of chrysotile or tremolite and actinolite, but Group III had a lung burden of amosite and crocidolite that was three orders of magnitude greater than in Groups I and II, with no overlap. We conclude that (1) the American Thoracic Society criterion of "a reliable history of exposure" is sometimes difficult to define; (2) asbestos bodies are seen in tissue sections only when exposure has been reasonably high, and given the proper clinical setting, the presence of diffuse fibrosis and asbestos bodies in tissue sections are sensitive and specific criteria for a diagnosis of asbestosis; and (3) the prevalence here of 5.1% nonasbestos-induced interstitial lung disease among asbestos-exposed persons is artefactually high because of atypical case selection. However, because asbestosis is a disappearing disease, such cases will become more frequent. The identification of these other diseases is important because therapy and prognosis may differ from that of asbestosis.
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ranking = 0.009041817374541
keywords = exposure
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18/67. asbestosis, endobronchial Aspergillus infection, and bronchocentric granulomatosis presenting with hemoptysis.

    A patient with pulmonary asbestosis developed hemoptysis and a lesion on chest radiograph secondary to bronchocentric granulomatosis (BG) associated with aspergillus fumigatus. Although pulmonary Aspergillus infection is a known complication of asbestos exposure. BG has not been previously reported in this disorder. This patient's case further documents that Aspergillus hyphae may be present in BG unassociated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A wide range of processes affecting airways, including asbestos exposure, may be associated with bronchocentric granulomatosis.
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ranking = 0.009041817374541
keywords = exposure
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19/67. asbestosis, laryngeal carcinoma, and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in an insulation worker.

    Asbestos associated diseases consist of both benign and malignant conditions. A rare constellation of asbestosis, laryngeal carcinoma, and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma occurring in a patient with long term occupational exposure to airborne asbestos fibres is presented. The observation illustrates the powerful disease-causing potential of occupational exposure to asbestos. A brief discussion of multiple primary neoplasms associated with exposure to asbestos is also presented.
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ranking = 1.9683536391891
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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20/67. Rounded atelectasis complicated by obstructive pneumonia and pulmonary arterial thrombosis.

    A patient with a history of asbestos exposure developed rounded atelectasis. The mass was associated with local bronchial obstruction, obstructive pneumonia and arterial thrombosis. autopsy demonstrated marked pleural thickening and radiographically inapparent asbestosis. This is the first reported case in which seemingly benign rounded atelectasis not only increased morbidity, but also contributed to mortality through airway obstruction and local arterial thrombosis.
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ranking = 0.0045209086872705
keywords = exposure
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