Cases reported "Ascaridida Infections"

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1/3. Raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) encephalitis: case report and field investigation.

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a common and widespread parasite of raccoons in the united states and canada. With large raccoon populations occurring in many areas, the potential risk of human infection with B procyonis is high. We report a case of severe raccoon roundworm (B procyonis) encephalitis in a young child to illustrate the unique clinical, diagnostic, and treatment aspects, as well as public health concerns of B procyonis infection. Acute and convalescent serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples from the patient were tested for antibodies against B procyonis to assist in documenting infection. An extensive field survey of the patient's residence and the surrounding community was performed to investigate raccoon abundance and to determine the extent of raccoon fecal contamination and B procyonis eggs in the environment. The patient evidenced serologic conversion, and the field investigation demonstrated a raccoon population far in excess of anything previously reported. There was abundant evidence of B procyonis eggs associated with numerous sites of raccoon defecation around the patient's residence and elsewhere in the community. Because B procyonis can produce such severe central nervous system disease in young children, it is important that pediatricians are familiar with this infection. The public should be made aware of the hazards associated with raccoons and B procyonis to hopefully prevent future cases of B procyonis infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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2/3. Eosinophil-associated inflammation and elaboration of eosinophil-derived proteins in 2 children with raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) encephalitis.

    OBJECTIVE: Eosinophil-associated proteins, especially eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, may be important contributors to the neurologic pathology and symptoms caused by Baylisascaris procyonis infection. methods: Two cases of severe B procyonis encephalitis with evidence of marked eosinophil degranulation in the central nervous system are presented. Serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens were collected from each patient during the course of their illness. antibodies against B procyonis were measured in the patients' serum and CSF. Levels of the eosinophilopoietin interleukin-5 (IL-5) and 2 important eosinophil proteins, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and major basic protein, were assayed in the CSF. RESULTS: Both patients had rapidly progressive central nervous system disease with evidence of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Both tested positive for antibodies to B procyonis in serum and CSF and had progressively worsening deep white matter changes on magnetic resonance images of the brain. CSF levels of IL-5, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, and major basic protein were markedly elevated over controls. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of the measurement of IL-5, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, and major basic protein in human CSF. In addition to traumatic damage and necrosis caused by migrating larvae, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin from associated eosinophilic inflammation may be an important contributory factor in the pathogenesis of B procyonis encephalitis. parasite, eosinophil-derived-neurotoxin, major basic protein, eosinophilia, hypereosinophilia, interleukin-5, encephalitis, child.
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ranking = 1.7277474536691
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
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3/3. diagnosis and management of Baylisascaris procyonis infection in an infant with nonfatal meningoencephalitis.

    Baylisacaris procyonis, the common raccoon ascarid, is known to cause life-threatening visceral, neural, and ocular larva migrans in mammals and birds. Two human fatalities have been previously described; however, little is known about the spectrum of human disease caused by B. procyonis. In this report, the case of a 13-month-old child who had nonfatal meningoencephalitis secondary to B. procyonis infection is presented. The suspected diagnosis was confirmed with use of newly developed enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot techniques. The diagnosis, management, and prevention of B. procyonis infection in humans is discussed. Clinical, serological, and epidemiological evaluations established B. procyonis as the etiologic agent. The child survived his infection but continued to have severe neurological sequelae. The potential for human contact and infection with B. procyonis is great. There is no effective therapy; therefore, prevention is paramount.
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ranking = 1.6387372683455
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
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