Cases reported "Ascites"

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1/212. Palliative sclerosis of intra-abdominal cystic ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma.

    Three patients with platinum- and paclitaxel-resistant predominantly cystic intra-abdominal recurrences of ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma were treated with CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage and subsequent sclerosis. This relieved colonic or ureteral obstruction and provided significant relief from symptoms. In one case repeated sclerosis was performed. sclerosis of cystic recurrences may provide additional palliation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
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2/212. Richter's hernia: a rare presentation of abdominal tuberculosis.

    intestinal obstruction due to Richter's hernia has not been reported in abdominal tuberculosis. This 21-year-old man with abdominal tuberculosis presented with small gut obstruction due to Richter's hernia associated with ascites and patent right processus vaginalis (PV). He underwent laparotomy with reduction of Richter's hernia and closure of the PV at the right deep inguinal ring.
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ranking = 2
keywords = obstruction
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3/212. Markedly elevated CA125 in hepatic cirrhosis: two case illustrations and review of the literature.

    CA125 is the most widely used tumor marker presently available for use in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Although elevated in a high percentage of patients with ovarian cancer, serum CA125 levels have also been detected in patients with numerous benign and malignant nongynecologic disorders, including various diseases of the liver. Despite this well-publicized fact, it has become apparent that the association between CA125 elevation, particularly the degree of elevation, and liver disease may not be as widely recognized as one would suspect. When marked CA125 elevations occur, diagnostic confusion is common. We describe two cases illustrative of this point. Both cases involve middle-aged women who presented with massive ascites and due to markedly elevated serum CA125 levels underwent exploratory laparotomy with hysterectomy and/or bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy before their referral to our center. Because preservation of a woman's reproductive organs is a significant concern, it is imperative that both primary care physicians and specialists are aware of such associations and the proper use of tumor markers.
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ranking = 11.462171435112
keywords = hepatic
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4/212. Refractory hepatic hydrothorax treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

    A 66-year-old cirrhotic woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of refractory pleural effusion and dyspnea. Massive right sided-pleural effusion but no ascites was detected. She had been treated with diuretics and albumin, repeated thoracenteses, and pleural drainage with an intercostal catheter, all of which had failed to relieve her symptoms. The diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax without ascites was made by injection of technetium-99m-sulfur colloid into the peritoneal cavity. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was placed and successfully reduced the pleural effusion, resulting in complete relief of her symptoms. The patient has been free of symptoms for 18 months after the procedure.
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ranking = 28.65542858778
keywords = hepatic
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5/212. Incarceration of umbilical hernia following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the treatment of ascites.

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is an effective therapy for patients with medically refractory ascites. Many patients with refractory ascites have umbilical herniation. Incarceration of umbilical hernia has been reported following diuresis, paracentesis, and peritoneovenous shunting. We report 2 cases of umbilical hernia incarceration following resolution of ascites after TIPS.
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ranking = 14.32771429389
keywords = hepatic
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6/212. Abdominal distention and shock in an infant.

    Acute abdominal distention in the pediatric patient may be attributable to extraperitoneal fluid, masses, organomegaly, air, an ileus, a functional or mechanical bowel obstruction, or injury and blood secondary to trauma. An infant who presents to the emergency department with acute abdominal distention and shock is a true emergency for which the differential diagnosis is extensive. An unusual case of abdominal distention, ascites, hematochezia, and shock in an infant, subsequently found to have spontaneous perforation of the common bile duct is reported. This uncommon cause of abdominal distention and shock in an infant is many times left out of the differential diagnosis of an acute abdomen. The presentation may be as an uncommon acute form or a classis subacute type. This patient had hematochezia, which had not been previously reported in association with this entity. Failure to recognize and treat an acute abdomen can result in high mortality.
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ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
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7/212. Functional, life-threatening disorders and splenectomy following liver transplantation.

    splenectomy (SPL) in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation (LTx) may resolve specific problems related to the procedure itself, in case of functional and life-threatening clinical situations often occurring as a result of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. METHOD: A single-center experience of ten splenectomies in a series of 180 consecutive adult liver transplant patients over a period of 6 yr is reported. The mean patient age was 46.8 /- 9.5 yr (range 25 57 yr). Indications for SPL were post-operative massive ascitic fluid loss (n = 3), severe thrombocytopenia (n = 3), acute intra-abdominal hemorrhage (n = 2), infarction of the spleen (n = 1), and multiple splenic artery aneurysms (n = 1). RESULTS: Extreme ascites production due to functional graft congestion disappeared post-SPL, with an improvement of the hepatic and renal functions. SPL was also effective in cases of thrombocytopenia persistence post-LTx, leading to an increase in the platelet count after about 1 wk. Bleeding episodes related to left-sided portal hypertension or trauma were also resolved. The rejection rate during hospitalization was 0%, and no other episodes were recorded in the course of the long-term follow-up. However, sepsis with a fatal outcome occurred in 4 patients, i.e. between 2 and 3 wk post-SPL in three cases and 1 yr after the procedure as a result of pneumococcal infection in the last case. Fatal traumatic cranial injury occurred 3 yr post-LTx in another case. Five patients (50%) are still alive and asymptomatic after a median follow-up period of 36 months. CONCLUSION: The lowering of the portal flow appears to resolve unexplained post-operative ascitic fluid loss as a result of functional graft congestion following LTx. However, because of the enhanced risk of SPL-related sepsis, a partial splenic embolization (PSE) or a spleno-renal shunt could be used as an alternative procedure because it allows us to preserve the immunological function of the spleen. SPL is indicated in case of post-transplant bleeding due to left-sided portal hypertension and trauma, spleen infarction, and to enable prevention of hemorrhage in liver transplant patients with multiple splenic artery aneurysms. Severe and persistent thrombocytopenia could be treated with PSE. Because the occurrence of fatal sepsis post-SPL is a major complication in LTx, functional disorders, such as ascites and thrombocytopenia, should be treated with a more conservative approach.
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ranking = 2.865542858778
keywords = hepatic
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8/212. Acquired cutaneous lymphangiectasia in a patient with cirrhotic ascites.

    BACKGROUND: Lymphangiectasia results from acquired dilation of lymphatic vessels. Areas of skin affected by obstruction or destruction of lymphatic drainage are said to be prone to the development of lymphangiectasia. Cirrhosis is a cause of alterations of lymph flow. methods: Case report. RESULTS: We report a case of acquired, late-onset, lymphangiectasia associated with alcoholic hepatic cirrhosis. Lesions were scattered over the right, lower, anterior abdominal wall, a region that is drained by a common group of lymphatic vessels that were probably disordered. CONCLUSION: We think that this is the first reported case of lymphangiectasia associated with altered lymph flow in cirrhosis and ascites.
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ranking = 3.865542858778
keywords = hepatic, obstruction
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9/212. laparoscopy extends the indications for liver resection in patients with cirrhosis.

    BACKGROUND: Clinical or biological evidence of liver failure is usually considered a contraindication to open liver surgery as it is associated with a prohibitive risk of postoperative death. methods: This report describes three patients who had resection of a superficial hepatocellular carcinoma suspected either to be ruptured, or at high risk of rupture, using the laparoscopic approach. All three patients had intractable ascites, in two superimposed on active hepatitis. Surgery was per- formed under continuous carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum with intermittent clamping of the hepatic pedicle. RESULTS: Intraoperative blood loss was between 100 and 400 ml; no blood transfusion was required. The postoperative course was uneventful except for a transient leak of ascites through the trocar wounds. Duration of in-hospital stay was 6-10 days. liver function tests had returned to preoperative values within 1 month of surgery in all patients. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic approach may enable liver resection in patients with cirrhosis and evidence of liver failure that would contraindicate open surgery.
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ranking = 2.865542858778
keywords = hepatic
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10/212. Fatal course of veno-occlusive disease of the liver (endophlebitis hepatica obliterans) in a preterm infant.

    We describe the fatal course of a preterm infant of 34 weeks' gestation with veno-occlusive disease of the liver and refractory ascites. Despite aggressive medical management, the baby died twenty-two hours post partum because of cerebral haemorrhage before potentially life-saving organ transplantation could take place. At autopsy, paucity of lymphoid tissue in lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract were also seen. To our knowledge, this is the youngest infant with veno-occlusive disease of the liver reported in the literature.
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ranking = 11.462171435112
keywords = hepatic
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