Cases reported "Ascites"

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1/33. Iliac arteriovenous fistula with renal insufficiency, ascites, hepatomegaly, and abnormal liver test results.

    arteriovenous fistula presents rarely with liver involvement. A 73-year-old man had new-onset ascites, hepatomegaly, and abnormal liver and renal function test results. An abdominal computed tomogram revealed a 7.6-cm internal iliac aneurysm but no other abnormality to account for his ascites. An aortogram demonstrated a 1.5-cm internal iliac arteriovenous fistula that subsequently was repaired, leading to resolution of his symptoms and laboratory abnormalities. High-output cardiac failure should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with new-onset massive ascites, hepatomegaly, and liver test abnormalities.
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2/33. Disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis associated with a panperitonitis-like onset: report of a case.

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our department due to a fever of unknown origin. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a large cystic mass in the lower abdomen and a massive amount of abdominal fluid. A laparotomy was performed under a diagnosis of panperitonitis. Diffuse pyogenic gelatinous ascites and a large cystic mass with a grayish wall, and a hard solid lesion in part were found. The microscopic findings of the hard solid lesion showed calcification, osteogenesis, and focal epithelial proliferation in a tiny area consisting of mucinous cells with no significant cytologic atypia. The remaining part of the cystic wall and small cystic lesions were hyalinized, fibrous, or necrotic tissue. Since a total resection of the masses was not possible, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin followed by the administration of mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. An abdominal fistula with the excretion of pyogenic gelatinous fluid occurred, but the patient is still alive and doing well over 2 years postoperatively. The primary site of this tumor could unfortunately not be identified.
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3/33. A hyperdynamic portal syndrome with ascites after endoscopic laser treatment.

    laser therapy has gained wide acceptance and application in many medical disciplines. Side effects of laser therapy are rare and the most frequent mainly involve the skin. We describe a patient affected by familial adenomatous polyposis that had been repeatedly controlled and treated endoscopically using an Nd:Yag laser. He presented with a progressive hyperdynamic portal syndrome with ascites caused by some arterovenous fistulas. We hypothesize that a rare side effect of the laser treatment may have caused ischemic and coagulative tissue inflammation that triggered off the pathological communications between the arterial and portal circulation.
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4/33. Pancreaticoportal fistula in association with antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as ascites and portal system thrombosis.

    Fistulous communication between the pancreas and the portal venous system is extremely rare and is usually a complication of chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic pseudocysts. A patient who presented with abdominal pain and ascites secondary to a pancreaticoportal fistula and portal system thrombosis is described. The diagnosis was made by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and confirmed by immediate postprocedure computed tomographic scanning. Laboratory studies identified concomitant antiphospholipid syndrome. The patient responded favourably to supportive medical therapy.
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5/33. Pancreatic ascites in the first year of life.

    A case of pancreatic ascites in a 4-month-old baby girl is reported. To the best of our knowledge only 4 previous cases occurring in the first year of life have been reported in the pediatric literature. In patients with unexplained ascites, amylase determination should be performed on ascitic fluid and serum. The baby was first treated by external drainage and later by internal drainage of the pseudocyst which had formed along the fistula.
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6/33. Successful treatment of refractory hepatic lymphorrhea after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, using surgical ligation and subsequent OK-432 (picibanil) sclerotherapy.

    Postoperative hepatic lymphorrhea is a very rare complication after abdominal surgery. Hepatic lymphorrhea, not containing chyle, involves an internal lymph fistula between the lymphatic channels toward the cisterna chyli and the peritoneal cavity. Over the past 20 years, 17 cases have been reported in japan. Here, we report a further case, of a patient with successfully treated intractable hepatic lymphorrhea following gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. We review 18 cases, including the present case, with respect to the management of postoperative lymphorrhea refractory to conventional medical treatment.
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7/33. An unusual case of ascites.

    A 76-year-old woman with abdominal pain and diarrhoea developed ascites that did not respond to treatment. There were no signs of liver damage. Abdominal ultrasonography with colour Doppler revealed an arterial-like flow in the enlarged splenic vein. Using selective mesenteric arteriography, we were able to diagnose a shunt between the inferior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric vein. This is an unusual case of ascites due to prehepatic portal hypertension secondary to an extrahepatic arterioportal fistula.
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8/33. Aneurysmal dilatation of the portal vein: a rare cause of portal hypertension.

    Aneurysmal dilatation of the portal vein (ADPV) is a rare cause of portal hypertension. We described a case of ADPV in a female patient who presented with ascites. Imaging studies revealed tortuosity and dilatation of the main portal vein with turbulent flow. endoscopy revealed oesophageal varices. A liver biopsy showed no abnormalities in liver histology. This is the first case of ascites as a complication of ADPV in the absence of liver cirrhosis, arteriovenous fistula or documented portal vein thrombosis. Hyperdynamic circulation and increased portal vein flow could be implicated in the pathogenesis of ascites in this setting.
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9/33. Antenatal ultrasonographic appearance of isolated fetal ascites. A case report of sinus urogenitalis.

    BACKGROUND: Isolated fetal ascites can be caused by many heterogeneous disorders and is associated with a variety of conditions. Cloacal anomalies are rare abnormalities with a highly variable array of sonographic symptoms, which make them difficult to diagnose antenatally. We present a case with isolated fetal ascites without hydronephrosis caused by a cloacal malformation. CASE: A 28-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 1, was referred to our unit at 18 weeks gestation with a hyperdense structure in the fetal liver. cordocentesis revealed a normal karyotype and negative viral titers. Isolated fetal ascites occurred for the first time at 23 weeks gestation. Serial ultrasounds showed progressive fetal ascites with no hydronephrosis at any time and no other malformations apart from the previously diagnosed hyperechogenic liver structure. After the insertion of an abdomino-amniotic shunt, a temporary reduction of the sonographically detectable ascites could be achieved. Cesarean delivery was necessary due to a pathological CTG at 33 weeks of gestation. The baby was born with a markedly distended abdomen. Postnatal radiologic examination showed two fistulae between the cloaca and the notedly dilated vagina and the rectum respectively. At the age of 3 months a vaginoplasty was performed, which involved creating a correctly positioned vaginal opening, reconstruction of the urethra and rectum as well as occlusion of the two fistulae. CONCLUSION: In view of the examinations, performed before and after delivery, it has to be assumed that fetal urine drained via the cloaca through the fallopian tubes into the abdomen. In contrast to usual appearance of cloacal malformations no hydronephrosis was detected and the kidney function was normal at all times. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of isolated fetal ascites without hydronephrosis caused by a cloacal malformation.
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10/33. ascites, elevated CA 125, and a large adnexal mass with an enteroovarian fistula.

    BACKGROUND: Rectovaginal and vesicovaginal fistulae occur commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-positive women and typically present with a characteristic vaginal discharge. CASE: We report a case of a jejunal-ovarian fistula presenting as suspected malignancy in a 38-year-old woman with hiv. The patient presented with ascites, moderately elevated CA 125, and a 12-cm adnexal mass. She was expedited to surgery secondary to a persistent pelvic mass and the patient's desire for definitive treatment. We believe the patient's immunocompromised state caused a microperforation in the small bowel, which subsequently formed a fistula to the ovary. The patient's left adnexa was removed, along with a 3-cm portion of small bowel. CONCLUSION: Uncommon entities should be included in the differential diagnosis of pelvic masses in immunocompromised women.
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