Cases reported "Ascites"

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1/3. diagnosis of strongyloides stercoralis in a peritoneal effusion from an hiv-seropositive man. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasite in humans with free-living and autoinfective cycles, is often an asymptomatic infection of the upper small intestine. If the host becomes immunocompromised, autoinfection may increase the intestinal worm burden and lead to disseminated strongyloidiasis. The parthenogenetic adult female larvae can remain embedded in the mucosa of the small intestine for years, producing eggs that develop into either rhabditiform, noninfective larvae or filariform, infective larvae. Manifestations of dissemination occur when the filariform larvae penetrate the intestinal wall and migrate into the blood. Pulmonary involvement is common, and the central nervous system may be affected. blood eosinophilia is typical, and gram-negative sepsis from enteric bacteria may occur. Much less commonly described is invasion of the peritoneal cavity with peritoneal effusion. CASE: A 49-year-old man who came to the united states from liberia 4 years earlier presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal distention, generalized weakness and marked pedal edema. Diagnostic paracentesis showed numerous filariform larvae of S stercoralis. Stool examination confirmed the presence of both rhabditiform and filariform larvae. Subsequently the patient was found to be hiv seropositive, with a CD4 lymphocyte count of 59. CONCLUSION: Early detection of S stercoralis may alter the often-fatal course of infection. The present case is the second reported one in the English-language literature of the diagnosis of S stercoralis in ascitic fluid.
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keywords = stercoralis
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2/3. Eosinophilic ascites due to strongyloides stercoralis.

    We report the case of a patient with eosinophilic ascites in whom filariform larvae of strongyloides stercoralis were found in smears of the ascitic fluid. The ascites resolved after therapy with albendazole. Eosinophilic ascites can rarely result from parasitic infections including strongyloides stercoralis.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = stercoralis
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3/3. Eosinophilic ascites due to hyperinfection with strongyloides stercoralis.

    We report the case of a patient with cryptogenic cirrhosis, new onset ascites, and hyperinfection with strongyloides stercoralis who had significant eosinophilia of the peritoneal fluid. The eosinophilia resolved with treatment of the S. stercoralis infection, and did not recur during two subsequent episodes of ascites and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Eosinophilic ascites is rare in parasitic infection, but it has been described in a variety of disorders which are discussed.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = stercoralis
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