Cases reported "Aspergillosis"

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11/32. Treatment of neutropenia in Felty's syndrome with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor--hematological response accompanied by pulmonary complications with lethal outcome.

    We report on a 67-year-old man with Felty's syndrome (FS) complicated by recurrent pneumonia and an infected wound, which was not healing in spite of maximal antibiotic and local therapy. Encouraged by previous experience, we treated him with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). His total leukocyte count rose, but the patient's pneumonia deteriorated. In addition, a previously known chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) was exacerbated acutely. These complications finally led to his death. Postmortem examination revealed widespread pneumonia with invasive aspergillosis and a peripheral adenocarcinoma in his left lung.
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keywords = wound
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12/32. surgical wound infection by aspergillus fumigatus in liver transplant recipients.

    Cutaneous aspergillosis is generally associated with immunosuppression, burns, and major trauma. Most cases are acquired by direct inoculation, although cutaneous involvement does occasionally occur with disseminated disease. Surgical wound infections caused by Aspergillus species are very unusual and to our knowledge have not been described in the setting of organ transplantation. We describe two liver transplant recipients who developed wound aspergillosis during a nosocomial outbreak of Aspergillus infection. Infection developed in the second and fourth postoperative week respectively, and in both cases wound appearance mimicked necrotizing fasciitis. Both patients died despite local debridement and antifungal therapy with amphotericin b. Aspergillus must be added to the list of potential pathogens of surgical wounds, especially in the setting of organ transplantation.
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ranking = 435.63055732322
keywords = wound infection, wound
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13/32. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis near central venous catheters in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    BACKGROUND--aspergillosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is unusual, and the clinicopathologic features of primary cutaneous aspergillosis in this setting are undefined. Our findings show that the manifestations can differ from those of primary cutaneous aspergillosis in other immunocompromised patients. OBSERVATIONS--Two men with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed foci of primary cutaneous aspergillosis beneath adhesive tape near central venous catheter sites. Typical lesions were flesh-colored to pink, umbilicated papules that clinically resembled molluscum contagiosum. biopsy specimens showed variably ruptured follicles that contained collections of fungal hyphae typical of Aspergillus species. Cultures in one case identified aspergillus fumigatus. The use of nonocclusive dressings and local wound care resulted in involution of several lesions. CONCLUSIONS--Primary cutaneous aspergillosis begins as saprophytic involvement of hair follicles secondary to the altered microenvironment beneath adhesive tape. Systemic antifungal therapy is prudent, but in the absence of neutropenia or other traditional risk factors for dissemination, it appears that Aspergillus in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can produce relatively indolent cutaneous lesions with a tendency to resolve once precipitating factors are removed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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14/32. Cutaneous aspergillosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    aspergillosis is a serious infection in renal transplant patients especially if dissemination occurs. We report a case of primary cutaneous aspergillosis, an extremely rare entity described in only four cases in renal transplant. It should be sought when surgical wound shows a rapidly growing necrotizing features early post transplant and without evidence of hematogeneous or contiguous tissue or organ involvement. Early suspicion, diagnosis, extensive surgical debridement as well as rapid institution of amphotericin b can minimize the risk of dissemination.
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keywords = wound
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15/32. A case of Aspergillus mediastinitis after heart transplantation successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin b, caspofungin and voriconazole.

    Reported here is a case of mediastinitis caused by aspergillus fumigatus and staphylococcus epidermidis following a heart transplantation that was successfully treated with amphotericin b in combination with new antifungal drugs (caspofungin and voriconazole), antibiotics and superficial wound drainage. A review of the literature revealed that Aspergillus as a cause of mediastinitis has been rarely described. In the few existing reports, evolution was generally fatal, especially in immunocompromised patients, despite treatment with antifungal drugs and surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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16/32. Spectrum of clear corneal incision cataract wound infection.

    PURPOSE: To describe the presentation, management, and outcome of 5 patients who presented with main-port or side-port wound infection after uneventful clear corneal cataract surgery. SETTING: Ophthalmic Surgery Centre, Chatswood, and Department of ophthalmology, Prince of wales Hospital, Randwick, australia, and Moorfields eye Hospital NHS Foundation trust, london, United Kingdom. methods: This retrospective case series comprised 5 patients who had uneventful clear corneal phacoemulsification surgery and developed either a main-port or side-port wound infection. The clinical features, microbiologic studies, management, and results are reported. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 79 years. Infection of the main-port incision occurred in 3 cases and of the side port in 2 cases. The patients presented from a few days to several weeks after uneventful phacoemulsification. In 2 cases, the bacteria pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus aureus were isolated. In 1 case, the fungus Aspergillus was isolated and required extensive medical and surgical treatment. In the other 2 cases; empiric antimicrobial therapy was given because no organism was isolated in 1 case, and in the other milder case, microbiological investigations were not performed. Final visual acuity was 6/4 in 2 cases and 6/5, 6/12, and 6/18 in 1 case each. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial or fungal wound infection can present within days or even several weeks following clear corneal cataract surgery. patients with ocular discomfort or blurred vision after such surgery should be advised to report promptly. Rapid identification and appropriate management of patients with clear corneal wound infection can result in good visual outcomes.
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ranking = 692.20889171715
keywords = wound infection, wound
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17/32. The semi-permeability of silicone: a saline-filled breast implant with intraluminal and pericapsular aspergillus flavus.

    Fungal infection of breast implants is a rare complication. growth of fungi within the lumen of saline-filled implants has previously been demonstrated in laboratory studies, however, clinical infections are rare. We report a case of aspergillus flavus growth within and around a saline-filled breast implant that was inserted 18 months previously. This was successfully treated with implant removal and wound irrigation. Possible routes of microbial contamination as well as survival mechanisms of organisms within saline-filled implants are discussed. This case re-iterates that the silicone envelope of a saline-filled implant is selectively permeable and we believe this is instrumental in facilitating intraluminal microbial growth. This also emphasises the importance of stringent asepsis when dealing with saline-filled breast implants including avoiding contamination of the saline filling fluid.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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18/32. Aspergillus endocarditis: cure without surgical valve replacement.

    We have reported a case of fungal native valve endocarditis due to Aspergillus sp in which cure was effected by medical therapy alone. An infected sternectomy wound from a previous aortic valve replacement was considered a contraindication to surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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19/32. Sclerotium formation in an aspergillus flavus wound infection.

    A patient studied at autopsy was found to have a post-operative wound infection with aspergillus flavus in which there was the formation of fungal structures resembling sclerotia. The ability of Aspergillus to form sclerotia in tissue appears to be rare and is related to the strain of aspergillus flavus. Since sclerotia are considered as structures capable of withstanding dramatic shifts in the environment, the production of these in tissue may affect the efficacy of antifungal therapy.
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ranking = 432.63055732322
keywords = wound infection, wound
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20/32. "Fruiting bodies" of aspergillus on the skin of a burned patient.

    A case of a young man with an extensive total-body-surface burn complicated by wound infection is presented. One of the fungal organisms in the cutaneous burn wound had morphologically characteristic and diagnostic features by development of conidiophores ("fruiting bodies") pathognomonic of Aspergillus spp.
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ranking = 87.526111464644
keywords = wound infection, wound
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