Cases reported "Asthenopia"

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1/7. Impact of the line of sight on toric phakic intraocular lenses for hyperopia.

    We present a hyperopic patient with a decentered line of sight in whom the residual refractive error after toric phakic intraocular lens (TP IOL) implantation was improved by displacement and individualized treatment. A 35-year-old woman presented with asthenopic complaints 2 months after bilateral TP IOL implantation and IOL rotation 4 weeks later. Examination revealed the line of sight to be nasally and inferiorly decentered in relation to the center of the pupil. A more nasal reenclavation of the TP IOL decreased the coma, and the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20. We conclude that line of sight should be measured before TP IOL implantation, especially in hyperopic eyes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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2/7. Accommodation deficiency in healthy young individuals.

    Ten patients, ages 10 to 19, with accommodation insufficiency are reported. All patients were in good health and asymptomatic, except for asthenopia during near visual activities. Each patient's amplitude of accommodation was measured and found to be considerably below the minimal normal for their respective ages (an average of 6 diopters). Only three patients had associated convergence insufficiency. No etiology for the diminished accommodation was suggested by history or could be identified by careful examination. All patients were successfully managed optically with bifocals or reading glasses, although three required the addition of base-in prisms for the near exodeviation. Near vision testing and determination of the near point of accommodation should be part of the pediatric ophthalmologic examination in all patients with complaints referable to their reading and visual performance at near.
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ranking = 2
keywords = visual
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3/7. Restricted lees screen fields in patients with asthenopia, with and without psychogenic disorders.

    Lees screen restrictions of non-specific origin, including apparent restrictions of the SR, IR, and LR muscles, were reported last year by Labow et al. In this complementary study, the authors examined eight apparently healthy subjects who had no history of ocular or psychiatric problems, eight psychiatric patients, and eight who had had a CNS disorder or had suffered cerebral trauma. Comparison of the Lees screen findings, visual fields, and accommodative defects of these patients revealed significant restriction of the Lees screen fields in only those patients who had symptoms of asthenopia (including all in the third group). Thus, such restriction does not depend on emotional state.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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4/7. Vertical prisms. Why avoid them?

    Vertical prisms are useful in the permanent or temporary alleviation of asthenopic symptoms arising from a vertical misalignment of the visual axes. A wide variety of both comitant and noncomitant hyperdeviations may be candidates for vertical prism use. Vertical prism strength is seldom difficult to compute and when properly employed, vertical prisms do not lead to unsightly spectacles.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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5/7. Asynchronous cortical input and asthenopia.

    Abnormal delays in retinal-cortical transmission are typically associated with optic nerve disease. Clinically optic nerve diseases produce visual field abnormalities, decreased visual acuity, and color vision defects. Disease processes causing only interocular differences in retinal-cortical transmission properties are not easily detected. patients with diseases causing interocular latency differences may complain of visual discomfort and perceptual distortions yet perform normally in standard clinical tests. A simple procedure to minimize differences in interocular latency and provide relief from visual disturbances arising from this abnormality is described.
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ranking = 4
keywords = visual
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6/7. A new protocol for the optometric management of patients with reading difficulties.

    research by Evans et al. (Ophthal. Physiol. Opt. 15, 481-487, 1995) has demonstrated a correlation between visual processing and ocular motor factors in people with specific reading difficulties (dyslexia). In addition, research by Wilkins et al. (Ophthal. Physiol. Opt. 14, 365-370, 1994) has shown that some people with dyslexia will benefit from a reduction of perceptual symptoms of discomfort and distortion if they use individually prescribed coloured filters. Three examples of the dyslexic patients who attend at the Institute of optometry clearly demonstrate the importance of full investigation of ocular function, including the assessment of the effect of colour on visual perception. All three patients presented with similar symptoms of asthenopia when reading. Symptoms were alleviated for the first patient by use of orthoptic treatment of an exotropia with intermittent suppression. With the second patient, ocular motor functions were found to be within acceptable limits and relief of symptoms was obtained by the prescribing of lenses of a specific chromaticity. For the third patient, both orthoptic intervention and the use of specifically tinted lenses were necessary to relieve the visual difficulties that were being experienced. By taking advantage of recent research and developments in optometric instrumentation, it is possible for some of those with dyslexia to receive considerable benefit from optometric intervention.
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ranking = 3
keywords = visual
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7/7. Bilateral striate cortex contusion presenting with cerebral asthenopia rather than cortical blindness.

    We report a 22-year-old female with a history of contusion of bilateral occipital lobes at the age of 1 year. magnetic resonance imaging confirmed severe lesion in bilateral striate cortices which should have resulted in cortical blindness. However, she displayed a fairly good visual function presenting only cerebral asthenopia and the restriction of the visual field. A positron emission tomography revealed that no areas other than the primary visual cortices responded to visual stimuli. Thus, her residual vision may be attributable to plasticity of the visual cortex in humans.
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ranking = 35023.476430116
keywords = striate cortex, cortex, visual
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