Cases reported "Asthma"

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1/325. Facial dermatitis, contact urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma induced by potato.

    BACKGROUND: Potato contains multiple heat-labile proteins which can induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis have been described in association with potato exposure. OBJECTIVE: A patient with possible airborne facial dermatitis to potato is described. RESULTS: A middle-aged atopic housewife with pre-existent atopic dermatitis suffered from rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, and contact urticaria when pealing raw potatoes, but her main complaint was intense, treatment-resistant dermatitis of the face. The investigations showed a positive prick test, a positive patch test, and positive specific serum IgE to raw potato. Potato avoidance led not only to the resolution of the immediate symptoms, but also of the facial dermatitis, suggesting she had dermatitis due to this vegetable. CONCLUSIONS: Potato may induce contact dermatitis with positive immediate and delayed hypersensitivity tests.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
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2/325. asthma due to inhaled chemical agents--fumes from 'Multicore' soldering flux and colophony resin.

    Four patients with occupational asthma associated with exposure to soldering flux or hot-melt glue containing pine resin (colophony) were subjected to occupational type inhalation challenge testing. All four gave immediate bronchial reactions to inhalation of the fumes, varying from one breath to 3 min of exposure. The clinical history and provocation test reactions suggest hypersensitivity to colophony fumes.
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ranking = 2
keywords = exposure
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3/325. silk-induced asthma.

    The existence of professional allergens in the home environment is important because their avoidance usually resolves the problem completely. We report on a case of an asthmatic woman who, for five years, was helping her husband create large artistic screens with the cocoons of the silkworms. Extensive laboratory evaluation revealed that she was allergic to silk and her symptoms resolved in three months following discontinuation of her exposure to silk allergens.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
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4/325. T cell involvement in persulfate triggered occupational contact dermatitis and asthma.

    BACKGROUND: Ammonium and potassium persulfates may induce a variety of cutaneous and respiratory diseases. The precise underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear. OBJECTIVE: To describe a hairdresser, who developed contact dermatitis, rhinoconjuntivitis, and bronchial asthma of delayed onset after occupational exposure to hair bleaches containing persulfate salts and to provide evidence for a common T-cell mediated mechanism responsible for the clinical manifestations. methods: We performed skin testing, routine histologic and immunohistochemical examination of the skin reaction after prick testing, lymphocyte proliferation analysis, nasal challenge test, and pulmonary function testing. RESULTS: The causative role of bleaching powder and ammonium persulfate was demonstrated by case history, skin tests, and a nasal challenge test. patch tests produced a delayed cutaneous reaction to ammonium persulfate confirming contact sensitization. Prick tests with bleaching powder and ammonium persulfate were negative at 15 minutes but revealed a late skin reaction with a papule at the prick sites after 24 hours. Histologic examination of this late reaction demonstrated a perivascular infiltration comprising predominantly T lymphocytes. Further, a significant proliferation of T cells to bleaching powder was reproducibly found by a lymphocyte proliferation analysis. Nasal challenge test with bleaching powder showed a significant reduction of air flow after 24 hours. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that immunologic mechanism with direct involvement of T cells may not only play an important role in the pathogenesis of the cutaneous but also in the respiratory and rhinoconjunctival reactions.
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ranking = 101.73433520028
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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5/325. Occupational IgE-mediated asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria caused by Easter lily (lilium longiflorum) and tulip.

    BACKGROUND: We report on IgE-mediated asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria to two liliaceae plants, tulip and Easter lily (lilium longiflorum), diagnosed in a floral shop worker. methods: Occupational asthma was diagnosed according to patient history, PEF monitoring, and a work-simulating provocation test. Flower-specific IgE was studied, and RAST inhibition tests were performed. RESULTS: Skin prick testing showed positive reactions to tulip, Easter lily, and chrysanthemum. Total IgE was 180 kU/I, and specific IgE to tulip was 2.6 and to Easter lily 6.5 kU/I. In the RAST-inhibition test, no cross-reactivity was found. Occupational asthma was diagnosed by peak flow monitoring at work and at home, as well as specific inhalation challenge with Easter lily, with an immediate 18% reduction in PEF. In addition, contact urticaria and conjunctivitis were diagnosed. After a 9-year follow-up without exposure to lilies, the skin prick tests to L. longiflorum and tulip were still positive, but the specific IgE had disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: A case of IgE-mediated occupational asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria caused by L. longiflorum and tulip is presented. RAST inhibition tests indicated concomitant sensitization to the two liliaceae plants.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
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6/325. Occupational neutrophilic asthma.

    Occupational asthma is typically associated with an eosinophilic bronchitis. The case of a 41-year-old woman who developed symptoms of asthma after occupational exposure to metal working fluids is reported. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by an forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 1.7 (59% predicted), with 11% reversibility after inhaled bronchodilator and a provocation concentration of methacholine to cause a fall in FEV1 of 20% (PC20) of 0.4 mg/mL. Induced sputum examination showed a marked neutrophilia. Over the next six months, serial sputum analyses confirmed the presence of a marked sterile neutrophilic bronchitis during periods of occupational exposure to metal working fluids, which resolved when the patient was away from work and recurred when she returned to work. The sputum findings were mirrored by corresponding changes in spirometry and PC20 methacholine. The findings indicate the occurrence of occupational asthma associated with an intense, sterile neutrophilic bronchitis after exposure to metal working fluids.
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ranking = 204.46867040056
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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7/325. Occupational asthma and contact dermatitis in a spray painter after introduction of an aziridine cross-linker.

    A 23-year-old spray painter developed contact dermatitis and respiratory difficulty characterized by small airways obstruction shortly after the polyfunctional aziridine cross-linker CX-100 began to be used in his workplace as a paint activator. The symptoms resolved after he was removed from the workplace and was treated with inhaled and topical steroids. Painters may have an increased risk of asthma due to exposure to a variety of agents, such as isocyanates, alkyd resins, and chromates. This case illustrates the importance of using appropriate work practices and personal protective equipment to minimize exposure. Occupational asthma is diagnosed by a history of work-related symptoms and exposure to known causative agents. The diagnosis is confirmed by serial pulmonary function testing or inhalational challenge testing. The risk of asthma attributable to occupational exposures is probably underappreciated due to underreporting and to inappropriate use of narrow definitions of exposure in epidemiologic studies of attributable risk.
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ranking = 105.73433520028
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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8/325. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome following exposure to a fluorocarbon.

    This report describes the case of a 43-yr-old male who developed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after exposure to a high level of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br, Halon 1301), a fluorocarbon widely used in automatic fire extinguishing systems. The patient was a previously healthy, nonatopic male, who developed wheezing and intermittent and reversible obstructive ventilatory impairment starting immediately after a large accidental nonfire-related release of CF3Br in a confined space.
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ranking = 5
keywords = exposure
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9/325. Sensitization to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC) with cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    The case is presented of a man with allergic contact dermatitis and occupational asthma due to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC), which is used as a hardener in thermosetting powder paint. The contact dermatitis was confirmed by patch testing (TGIC 0.5% and 5% in petrolatum), and the occupational asthma was confirmed by bronchial provocation testing: two challenges to an aerosol of lactose containing TGIC (0.05% and 0.1%, w/w, each for 0.5 1 2 4 min) led to a maximal decrease in FEV1 of 22% and 31% after 6 and 4 h, respectively. Skin prick tests with unconjugated TGIC were possibly positive. This case confirms that exposure to TGIC in powder paints may cause not only contact dermatitis, but also occupational asthma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
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10/325. Severe allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an infant with cystic fibrosis and her asthmatic father.

    An infant with cystic fibrosis and her asthmatic father were diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). cystic fibrosis was diagnosed in the infant at 6 weeks of age, and gene mutations were W1282X/G542X. She was diagnosed definitively as suffering from ABPA at age 3.5 years, but had suggestive symptoms from age 11 months. This may be the youngest age described to date for ABPA. The child responded well to systemic steroid therapy, but remained steroid-dependent over the next 4 years. Treatment with itraconazole enabled a marked reduction in steroid dosage. The father was an asthmatic, and a heterozygote for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation W1282X. He had a normal sweat test, atopy, and moderate reversible airway obstruction. There was no proven exposure to aspergillus in the home environment. The importance of considering the diagnosis of ABPA even in infancy, the therapeutic dilemmas, and the possible role of abnormal CFTR function in the development of ABPA are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
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