Cases reported "Ataxia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. intracranial hypotension with parkinsonism, ataxia, and bulbar weakness.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with a previously unreported constellation of presenting features. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Tertiary care center. MAIN OUTCOME AND RESULTS: We describe a patient with intracranial hypotension who presented with a parkinsonian syndrome and later development of ataxia and prominent bulbar symptomatology. headache was not a feature of her initial presentation and was only reported after repeated questioning during later evaluations. magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's head revealed findings characteristic of intracranial hypotension. An [18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine positron emission tomographic scan showed normal striatal activity, suggesting intact presynaptic nigrostriatal function. Opening pressure on lumbar puncture was reduced at 40 mm H2O. A source of cerebrospinal fluid leakage was not identified on nuclear cisternography and the patient underwent lumbar epidural blood patching, which resulted in complete resolution of her signs and symptoms as well as in a marked improvement in her imaging findings. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical spectrum of intracranial hypotension can be broadened to include parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, and prominent bulbar dysfunction. As with more common manifestations of the disorder, these features may resolve after appropriate treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Facial numbness in a man with inguinal and retroperitoneal masses.

    BACKGROUND: A 37-year-old Brazilian man was admitted to massachusetts General Hospital for evaluation of left-sided facial numbness, left-sided ataxia, dizziness, and vertigo. Seven weeks prior to admission, he reported numbness of the left oral cavity and tongue after a dental procedure. Three weeks prior to presentation, he developed left-sided incoordination with dizziness and vertigo. One week later, he noticed difficulty using a box cutter at work and presented to the emergency department for evaluation. A CT scan without contrast revealed no abnormalities and he was discharged home. Three days prior to admission, the patient developed diplopia. Cranial MRI revealed a 1.6 cm irregular enhancing mass in the left middle cerebellar peduncle. neurologic examination was significant for diminished sensation over the left face to pinprick, left-sided dysmetria, and mild lateral instability of the trunk while walking. INVESTIGATIONS: MRI, lumbar puncture, CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis, needle biopsy of the lymph node, and paraneoplastic antibodies. diagnosis: Possible paraneoplastic demyelination. MANAGEMENT: orchiectomy, adjuvant radiation, and corticosteroids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. seizures, ataxia, developmental delay and the general paediatrician: glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome.

    AIM: glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an important condition for the general paediatrician's differential armamentarium. We describe a case series of eight patients in order to raise awareness of this treatable neurometabolic condition. The diagnosis of GLUT1-DS is suggested by a decreased absolute cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose value (<2.2 mmol/L) or lowered CSF: plasma glucose ratio (<0.4). methods: This is a review of eight queensland patients with GLUT1-DS. The clinical presentation, clinical course, laboratory investigations and treatment outcomes are discussed. RESULTS: The clinical features noted in our patient cohort include combinations of ataxia, developmental delay and a severe seizure disorder that is refractory to anticonvulsant medications. seizures are the most common clinical manifestation and may be exacerbated by phenobarbitone. The paired CSF: plasma glucose results ranged from 0.2 to 0.39 (normal <0.6) with an average of 0.33. 3-O-Methyl-D-glucose uptake and GLUT1 Genotyping analysis have been performed on five patients thus far. Rapid and impressive seizure control was observed in 100% of our patients once the ketogenic diet was instituted, with half of the cohort being able to wean completely from anticonvulsants. CONCLUSION: Children presenting with a clinical phenotype consisting of a refractory seizure disorder, ataxia and developmental delay should prompt the consideration of glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome. While the diagnostic test of lumbar puncture is an invasive manoeuvre, the diagnosis provides a viable treatment option, the ketogenic diet. GLUT1-DS displays clinical heterogeneity, but the value of early diagnosis and treatment is demonstrated by our patient cohort.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. The minor symptoms of increased intracranial pressure: 101 patients with benign intracranial hypertension.

    Of 101 patients with benign intracranial hypertension not related to vasculitis, neck stiffness occurred in 31, tinnitus in 27, distal extremity paresthesias in 22, joint pains in 13, low back pain in 5, and gait "ataxia" in 4. Symptoms resolved promptly upon lowering the intracranial pressure by lumbar puncture, and were probably directly caused by intracranial hypertension. awareness of these "minor" symptoms of increased intracranial pressure can facilitate diagnosis and management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. External ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia complicating acute infectious polyneuritis.

    A 13-year-old girl suddenly experienced ataxia, bilateral external ophthalmoplegia, and areflexia. She was previously healthy but several family members had had a flu-like illness. cerebrospinal fluid punctures demonstrated a persistent lymphocytosis and protein elevation. Clinical improvement occurred in several months. These findings represent a variant of Guillain-Barre-Strohl syndrome (infectious polyneuritis), a systemic illness rather than a primary ophthalmologic entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Convulsions, ataxia and hallucinations following propofol.

    A 6-year-old fit girl experienced convulsions 44 h after an otherwise uneventful anaesthesia with propofol, alfentanil and nitrous oxide. As an underlying pathology was suspected, the child was kept sedated for 6.5 h for further investigations. During this period she received a continuous infusion of propofol amounting in total to 1600 mg. After having regained consciousness, she was strikingly ataxic and remained so for 5 days. During this period she also experienced two episodes of hallucinations lasting about 2 h. Investigations including lumbar puncture, EEG, cerebral CT and MR scan could not explain the neurological symptoms. She recovered without long-term sequelae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Ataxia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.