Cases reported "Athletic Injuries"

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1/302. Hang gliding injuries.

    Two fatal and 42 non-fatal hang gliding accidents are reported. The commonest cause was stalling the craft, either owing to adverse winds or to pilot inexperience. The most frequent injuries were fractures of the wrist, humerus and spine. Inexperienced pilots were involved in most of the accidents, so that the training and supervision of novices is of fundamental importance if the accident rate of the sport is to be reduced.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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2/302. Complete rotational burst fracture of the third lumbar vertebra managed by posterior surgery. A case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a young man with rotational burst fracture of the third lumbar vertebra, treated by posterior surgery. OBJECTIVES: To describe the management of a rotational burst fracture of the third lumbar vertebra by posterior surgery consisting of reduction, decompression, fusion, and transpedicular instrumentation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Surgery is the generally recommended means of managing lumbar burst fractures with neurologic deficit. Some surgeons recommend anterior decompression, fusion, and instrumentation. Posterior surgery with decompression through laminectomy, spongioplasty of the vertebral body, interbody fusion of damaged discs, posterolateral fusion, and transpedicular fixation is also a safe and successful management technique. The combined approach consists of posterior decompression, fusion, transpedicular fixation, and anterior fusion using pelvic autografts. The optimum method of management remains in question. METHOD: An 18-year-old man with complete rotational burst fracture of the third lumbar vertebra was treated by posterior surgery. This surgery consisted of reduction, laminectomy, decompression, structure of dural sac tears, spongioplasty of the vertebral body, interbody fusion of both damaged discs, and the implantation of a transpedicular Socon fixator (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, germany), including a transverse connector. The case was documented by radiographs and computed tomography scans before surgery and after fixator removal 19 months after surgery. RESULTS: The patient healed solidly with no instrumentation failure. The neurologic deficit Frankel Grade B improved to Frankel Grade D. CONCLUSION: Surgery to manage lumbar burst fracture must include reduction, decompression, restoration and fusion of anterior and posterior elements by using autologous pelvic spongious autografts, and anterior or posterior instrumentation. Posterior surgery including suturing of dural sac tears, fusion of damaged structures, and transpedicular fixation is successful in young patients and patients with good bone quality.
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ranking = 9
keywords = fracture
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3/302. Femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain in a marathon runner: case report.

    A case is described of a 50-year-old man with a femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain. An operative pinning procedure of the femoral neck was performed for stabilization. Femoral neck stress fractures are often misdiagnosed early in their presentation. The signs and symptoms can mimic those of more commonly seen disorders. Appropriate physiatric history and physical examination, along with indicated studies, will help prevent misdiagnosis and potentially serious complications associated with musculoskeletal pathology.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fracture
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4/302. Fracture of the sternum--an unusual case.

    Stress fracture of the sternum is a rare injury and can occur in young athletes due to repeated stress and in elderly with osteoporotic bones or other pathological conditions under normal stress. A case of a 14-year-old boy is reported who sustained fracture of the sternum without any history of significant trauma when he simply tried to lift his whole body over his arms and felt pain in front of the chest.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fracture
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5/302. Spinous process fractures in a jockey: a case report.

    Spinous process fractures typically represent avulsion injuries involving the lower cervical spine. This case report describes the clinical and radiographic findings in a patient with spinous process fractures at the T-2, T-3, and T-4 vertebral levels. The fractures, which were obscured on conventional radiographs by overlying osseous and soft-tissue structures, were optimally shown on axial and computer-reconstructed sagittal computed tomographic (CT) images. Although isolated spinous process fractures do not compromise spinal stability, chronic sequelae associated with fracture nonunion may occur if a fracture is not recognized and treated. Because conventional radiographic assessment of the thoracic posterior elements is often limited, cases of clinically suspected spinous process fracture often require CT evaluation to confirm the diagnosis.
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ranking = 11
keywords = fracture
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6/302. Reconstruction plate fixation with bone graft for mid-shaft clavicular non-union in semi-professional athletes.

    From 1993 to 1997, 22 semi-professional athletes (14 men and 8 women), aged 18-33 years (mountain bike racers, soccer players, handball players, swimmers, and short distance runners) with a non-union of the middle third of the clavicle were treated operatively by reconstruction plating and bone grafting. Fourteen clavicular non-unions were caused by falls. Eight non-unions were the result of a car, motorcycle, or bicycle accident. There were 19 atrophic and 3 hypertrophic non-unions. In all patients, initially a figure-of-eight strap or a sling was used for immobilization and no radiographic union was documented within 5 months. None of the athletes had gone back to their sports and all had pain and limitation of shoulder function. For open reduction and internal fixation, an AO 3.5-mm seven-hole reconstruction plate was used. The sclerotic bone ends were freshened and a cortical bone transplant or cancellous bone from the iliac crest (depending on the shortening of the clavicle) was packed around the fracture or between the reduced fracture ends. In all athletes, radiographic consolidation was achieved after an average of 14 weeks (range, 11-16 weeks) and the average increase in the Constant and Murley Score was from 79 points preoperatively to 97 points after surgery. No operative or postoperative complications occurred and all athletes returned to their sports.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fracture
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7/302. magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of sacral stress fracture.

    Low back and buttock pain in athletes can be a source of frustration for the athlete and a diagnostic dilemma for the doctor. Sacral stress fractures have been increasingly recognised as a potential cause of these symptoms. As plain radiographs are often normal and the radiation load of an isotope bone scan is substantial, the alternative use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of a sacral stress fracture is highlighted in this case report.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fracture
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8/302. Arthroscopic treatment of acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation and greater tuberosity fracture.

    We present a case and a description of treatment of an anterior dislocation of the shoulder with a greater tuberosity fracture. Both the Bankart lesion and the tuberosity fracture were repaired using arthroscopic techniques.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fracture
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9/302. Sledging related spinal injuries and fracture patterns: a report on five cases.

    The cases are reported of five patients who presented to The Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham after a sledging accident. All five patients presented consecutively during the first weekend in 1997 having sustained the accident in the same public park. The mechanism and subsequent fracture type is described for each. These injuries are preventable, and increasing public awareness of the risk of sledging in public places may reduce the incidence.
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ranking = 5
keywords = fracture
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10/302. The MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament in patients with posterior impingement syndrome of the ankle.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament (IML) in patients with posterior impingement syndrome (PIS) of the ankle. DESIGN AND patients: Three patients (one male and two females, 13-25 years of age) are presented. Each patient presented clinically with symptoms of PIS of the ankle. Plain film examination was negative for a structural cause of the PIS in all patients. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner using an extremity coil. Clinical data and, in one patient, findings at ankle arthroscopy, were correlated with the results of MR imaging. RESULTS: ankle MR images from the three patients with a clinical diagnosis of PIS are presented. Findings in all patients included: (1) absence of another structural cause of the PIS (i.e., an os trigonum, trigonal process, fracture, loose bodies, etc.), (2) identification of the IML as a structure discrete from the posterior talofibular and tibiofibular ligaments, and (3) prominence of the IML as indicated by (a) identification of the IML in three different imaging planes, and (b) a caliber of the IML comparable to that of the conventional posterior ankle ligaments visualized in the same imaging plane. Arthroscopic resection of a meniscoid IML resulted in resolution of the PIS in one of the patients presented. CONCLUSIONS: MR imaging is an effective means of investigating the IML as a potential cause of PIS. The identification of a prominent IML in the absence of another structural cause of PIS indicates that impingement of the IML is the most likely cause of PIS.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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