Cases reported "Athletic Injuries"

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1/46. Femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain in a marathon runner: case report.

    A case is described of a 50-year-old man with a femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain. An operative pinning procedure of the femoral neck was performed for stabilization. Femoral neck stress fractures are often misdiagnosed early in their presentation. The signs and symptoms can mimic those of more commonly seen disorders. Appropriate physiatric history and physical examination, along with indicated studies, will help prevent misdiagnosis and potentially serious complications associated with musculoskeletal pathology.
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2/46. A young athlete with myositis ossificans of the neck presenting as a soft-tissue tumour.

    myositis ossificans is usually the result of direct injury to a muscle and is a self-limiting disease. It may present as a soft-tissue mass with a broad differential diagnosis, including highly malignant tumours, such as soft-tissue sarcomas. Many theories can be found concerning the aetiology of myositis ossificans, but minor or major traumas are considered to be the most common cause. A unique case of myositis ossificans of the neck in a 17-year-old professional, female, ground gymnast, who presented initially with a soft-tissue tumour, was treated successfully. The main differential diagnosis is presented along with typical radiographic features on conventional radiography, computerised tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and typical pathological appearance, such as the pathognomonic "zoning phenomenon". myositis ossificans should be added to the differential diagnosis of every young patient who engages in sport presents with a soft-tissue mass. Careful padding of the area and teaching the rolling technique to avoid repeated injuries to the neck can prevent recurrence.
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3/46. Trampolines, children, and strokes.

    Strokes in children related to sports injuries are rare, but pediatric trampoline injuries are dramatically increasing. Minor trauma to the vulnerable extracranial vertebral arteries as they travel superficially through the dorsum of the neck can begin a cascade of events that results in arterial dissection, thrombus formation, and embolization with cerebral infarction. We present the case of an 11-yr-old boy who developed left vertebral artery dissection subsequent to a trampoline injury.
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4/46. December 2002: 19-year old male with febrile illness after jet ski accident.

    The December 2002 COM. A 19-year-old healthy male fell into stagnant water of the intercostal waterway (salt water of South florida), following a jet ski accident. He sustained minor superficial injuries but engulfed significant quantities of water and sediment. A few days later he developed bifrontal headaches, vomiting, a stiff neck and a temperature of 102 degrees F. A CT scan on admission without contrast was negative. The CSF had markedly elevated white count but bacterial and fungal cultures were negative. He became progressively lethargic. On the fifth day he developed seizure activity. He expired the next day despite antibiotics. Gross examination of the brain at autopsy revealed edema, cerebellar tonsillar herniation and purulent meningitis. Microscopic examination revealed a massive leptomeningeal inflammatory infiltrate composed of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and numerous histiocyte-like cells. The inflammatory infiltrate extended into the cerebral parenchyma in numerous areas also involving the cerebellum, brainstem and ventricular system. Given the exposure to stagnant water (later confirmed to be a man-made fresh water lake), and the numerous histiocytic-like cells, suspicion for an amebic etiology of the disease process was raised and the CDC identified the ameba as naegleria fowleri. infection by naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba, occurs after exposure to polluted water in man-made fresh water lakes, ponds, swimming pools, particularly during the warm weather months when the thermophilic ameba grows well. The pathologic substrate of the infection is an acute hemorrhagic, necrotizing meningo-encephalitis mainly at the base of the brain, brainstem and cerebellum occurring in young, healthy individuals.
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5/46. hearing loss after direct blunt neck trauma.

    OBJECTIVE: To report for the first time hearing impairment resulting from blunt neck trauma. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review of clinical, pure tone, and speech audiometric findings. The first obtained within 3 months and the follow-up ones between 6 and 12 months after injury. Three representative examples are given. patients: Eighty-three patients (166 ears) who reported hearing impairment after blunt neck trauma. RESULTS: Twenty of the 166 ears (12%) had normal hearing and 137 ears (81.3%) showed an acoustic trauma-like hearing impairment. Eight ears (4.8%) had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB in the speech frequencies (500-2,000 Hz) and two ears (1.2%) had additional impairment in the higher frequencies. Only one ear (0.8%) had a conductive hearing loss. No speech discrimination score was poorer than 80%. Forty-six subjects (55.4%) reported tinnitus. CONCLUSIONS: Blunt neck trauma, like whiplash injury, may cause objectively measurable hearing impairment.
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6/46. Unusual transoral penetrating injury of the foramen magnum: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Penetrating injuries of the cranium and spine are frequent to the civilian neurosurgical practice. Although a variety of unusual objects have been reported, to our knowledge, there has never been a craniocerebral or spinal injury caused by a fish. An unusual case of transoral penetration of the foramen magnum by a billed fish is described. The history, radiographic studies, and treatment are presented. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A fisherman struck by a jumping fish initially presented with severe neck pain and stiffness, bleeding from the mouth, and a laceration in the right posterior pharynx. A computed tomographic scan of the cervical spine revealed a wedge-shaped, hyperdense object extending from the posterior pharynx into the spinal canal between the atlas and the occiput. Because of the time factor involved, the fisherman was brought directly to surgery for transoral removal of the object. INTERVENTION: The patient was placed under general anesthesia, and with a tonsillar retractor, a kipner, and hand-held retractors, the object was visualized and identified as a fish bill. Further dissection above the anterior aspect of the atlas permitted removal of the object by means of a grabber from an arthroscopic set. No expression of cerebrospinal fluid was noted, and a Penrose drain was placed. CONCLUSION: The patient was treated under the assumption that penetrating foreign objects in continuity with the cerebrospinal fluid space and the outside environment should be removed as soon as possible. The patient was provided appropriate antibiotics to treat potential infection of normal pharyngeal flora and organisms unique to the marine environment. The patient recovered and did not experience any residual neurological deficit.
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7/46. Treatment of bipolar, seizure, and sleep disorders and migraine headaches utilizing a chiropractic technique.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the use of an upper cervical technique in the case of a 23-year-old male patient with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, sleep disorder, seizure disorder, neck and back pain, and migraine headaches. CLINICAL FEATURES: The patient participated in a high school track meet at age 17, landing on his head from a height of 10 ft while attempting a pole vault. Prior to the accident, no health problems were reported. Following the accident, the patient developed numerous neurological disorders. Symptoms persisted over the next 6 years, during which time the patient sought treatment from many physicians and other health care practitioners. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: At initial examination, evidence of a subluxation stemming from the upper cervical spine was found through thermography and radiography. chiropractic care using an upper cervical technique was administered to correct and stabilize the patient's upper neck injury. Assessments at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months were conducted by the patient's neurologist. After 1 month of care, the patient reported an absence of seizures and manic episodes and improved sleep patterns. After 4 months of care, seizures and manic episodes remained absent and migraine headaches were reduced from 3 per week to 2 per month. After 7 months of care, the patient reported the complete absence of symptoms. Eighteen months later, the patient remains asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: The onset of the symptoms following the patient's accident, the immediate reduction in symptoms correlating with the initiation of care, and the complete absence of all symptoms within 7 months of care suggest a link between the patient's headfirst fall, the upper cervical subluxation, and his neurological conditions. Further investigation into upper cervical trauma as a contributing factor to bipolar disorder, sleep disorder, seizure disorder, and migraine headaches should be pursued.
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8/46. Missed diagnosis of an intraorbital foreign body of surfboard origin.

    Surfing is a highly popular recreational sport in australia and other parts of the world. A significant percentage of total acute injuries in surfboarding involve the head and neck, but major orbital or ocular trauma is infrequent. Ophthalmic injuries are typically due to blunt trauma from collision with the surfboard. We describe a mechanism of surfboard injury not previously described in the published literature, which involved penetration of orbital tissues by blade-like fragments of fiberglass when the surfboard outer shell broke up on impact with the surfer. The fiberglass left a trail of fibers and resin particles as it traveled through the eyelid and orbital tissues, requiring painstaking removal and debridement to minimize the long-term effects of inflammatory reactions and scarring in the orbital tissues.
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keywords = neck
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9/46. Spinal injury considerations in the competitive diver: a case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Despite significant literature associated with spinal injuries and recreational diving, few articles exist regarding competitive diving injuries, with no reports pertaining specifically to spinal injuries. As a result, a case report of a collegiate diver with C5-C6 ligamentous instability requiring operative stabilization is currently presented in addition to a review of the literature. PURPOSE: Present a case report of cervical C5-C6 ligamentous instability in a collegiate diver. STUDY DESIGN: Case report and literature review. methods: Not applicable. RESULTS: Not applicable. CONCLUSIONS: diving injuries pertaining to competitive diving do occur but to a lesser extent than would be expected given the large forces the spine experiences. Training, experience and appropriate technique greatly minimize potential spinal hazards. Persistent complaints of neck pain after a competitive diving injury mandate aggressive evaluation and further workup.
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10/46. Posttraumatic segmental axial dystonia.

    Isolated dystonia of trunk and neck muscles without involvement elsewhere has been termed segmental axial dystonia--a rare disorder. We report a 31-year-old man who developed marked dystonia of paraspinal muscles and progressive scoliosis 6 months after a closed head injury. Computed tomography (CT) disclosed three small areas of encephalomalacia, one involving the head of the caudate nucleus. Treatment with trihexyphenidyl resulted in significant improvement of the dystonia and scoliosis.
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