Cases reported "Athletic Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/46. An isolated hyoid fracture secondary to sport injury. A case report and review of literature.

    A 16-year-old boy sustained a fracture of the hyoid bone following closed neck injury from a hockey puck. Though commonly occurring in association of other fractures of the laryngeal skeleton, the fracture was isolated and a comprehensive evaluation implicated it solely for the clinical picture. Our review of the English literature displays the diversity of opinion on classification and treatment. It also indicates, however, that hyoid fractures are usually managed successfully with minimum intervention as indeed our case was.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/46. Two case reports of cervical spinal cord injury in football (soccer) players.

    STUDY DESIGN: Two case reports of male football players who sustained injury to cervical spinal cord as a direct result of the sport. OBJECTIVE: To raise the awareness that playing football (soccer), a very popular sport, may cause injury to the cervical spinal cord with dire consequences, albeit rarely.Setting: North West Regional spinal injuries Centre, Southport, UK. CASE REPORT: We report two male football players, who sustained injury to the cervical spine and developed tetraplegia as a direct result of the sport. Case 1: A 21-year-old football player was tackled from behind while running with the football, he lost his balance and landed on his head resulting in burst fracture dislocation of C5/C6 associated with immediate onset of complete tetraplegia (asia-A). Case 2: A 24-year-old football player collided, head first, with his own team goalkeeper, causing a hyperextension of neck. He developed motor complete tetraplegia at C5 level, with some sensation sparing below the level of injury (asia-B). CONCLUSION: Injury to the cervical spinal cord is known to occur in some team contact sports such as rugby and American football. Over time the laws and the preparation of the athletes for these games have been changed in order to minimize the neck injuries. What might not be appreciated is that playing football (soccer), a very popular sport worldwide, may cause injury to cervical spinal cord with dire consequences.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/46. An electrocution by metal kite line.

    A case is reported in which death is caused due to electrocution by a copper wire that was used as string of the kite. Electric current flowed through the copper wire of cut down kite when it touched power line transmitting alternate current of 240 V at 50 Hz. The free end of copper wire had abraded against the victim's shoulder, neck and face, and finally entangled around the ear. A unique type of electrical injury is noticed due to contact with live copper wire. This paper stresses the unique danger of the kite flying.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/46. Stress fractures in athletes. How to spot this underdiagnosed injury.

    Stress fractures are an increasingly common injury in competitive athletes, especially runners. Amenorrheic athletes are at particularly high risk. A radionuclide bone scan should be considered when the index of suspicion for stress fracture is high. Plain radiographs are of little use in establishing the diagnosis in the early stages of the injury. early diagnosis and prompt institution of conservative therapy allow for a favorable outcome in most cases. Avoidance of or reduced participation in the inciting activity is important for pain control. Certain stress fractures, such as those involving the femoral neck, should be monitored closely and treated aggressively with internal fixation when conservative measures fail. Runners who have exercise-induced amenorrhea should be advised to decrease their training intensity to a level where menses resume. Cyclic therapy with conjugated estrogens and progesterone should also be considered, as should daily calcium supplementation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/46. peroneal nerve entrapment in runners.

    In a practice involving large groups of athletes, seven runners and one soccer player with peroneal nerve compression neuropathy secondary to exercise have been found. running incited pain, numbness and tingling to varying degrees in all patients, and examination after running revealed muscle weakness and a positive percussion test as the nerve winds around the fibular neck. Nerve conduction velocity studies confirmed the diagnosis in the five patients on whom the test was performed; other studies served primarily to exclude other causes of pain. All patients were treated surgically by neurolysis of the peroneal nerve as it travels under the sharp fibrous edge of the peroneus longus origin. Seven of eight had excellent results and returned to their previous level of physical exertion without further symptoms. We think entrapment of the peroneal nerve at the fibular neck is a more common entity than previously recognized, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of exertional lateral leg pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/46. Osteoid osteoma of the neck of the talus.

    The authors present three cases of osteoid osteoma of the neck of the talus presenting with pain and restriction of ankle movement affecting athletic performance in young adults. If this condition is suspected in a patient, a bone scan will confirm the diagnosis. The result of treatment is positive in terms of relief of pain and return to activities in our patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/46. Posttraumatic syringomyelia associated with heavy weightlifting exercises: case report.

    Posttraumatic syringomyelia is a well-recognized late sequel to spinal trauma occurring in 1% to 3.2% of spinal cord injured patients. Its clinical presentation is usually marked by pain, ascending sensory loss, increased muscle weakness, and depressed deep tendon reflexes. The case of a 25-year-old man with C8 complete quadriplegia, who developed a syrinx five years after his initial injury, is presented. This patient kept a log of his daily physical workout which consisted of lifting weights of 50 to 60 pounds with his neck extensors and biceps. The diagnosis was made clinically and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Repeated valsalva maneuvers from daily heavy weightlifting exercises most likely predisposed this patient to the development and extension of his syringomyelia. Dramatic improvement followed surgical placement of a subarachnoid shunt.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/46. Injury to the eleventh cranial nerve in a high school wrestler.

    Injury to the 11th cranial nerve is not uncommon and is usually associated with surgical procedures in the posterior triangle of the neck. Although palsy resultant from external trauma has been described, there have been no cases reported of this injury occurring in a wrestler. This paper reports on such a case and reviews both the anatomic and the clinical aspects of 11th-nerve palsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/46. neck injuries in ice hockey: a recent, unsolved problem with many contributing factors.

    Previously unrecognized, major neck injuries in hockey have become a common problem in canada and they have increased markedly in the 1980s. At the present time, the incidence remains high and has shown no sign of diminishing. The etiology of the problem appears to be multifactorial. Several epidemiologic factors have been identified and a reporting system established so that prevention programs can be monitored. It is hoped that greater awareness of the risk factors among players, coaches, leagues, referees, and parents will be an effective prophylactic measure in itself. Prevention must involve several approaches by hockey organizations and leagues, players, equipment manufacturers, and health care professionals and researchers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/46. Unstable cervical spine injuries in rugby--a 20-year review.

    A study of a well-defined group of rugby players was undertaken in wales to determine whether there has been an increase in the number of serious neck injuries during the past 20 years. None such occurred until a single incident in 1964 and not again until 1974. Since then the injuries have continued at a steady rate of about two per year. The mechanism of the injuries was analysed but no single factor could be identified as being responsible for this sudden increase although tactics in the scrummage played an important part. The importance of flexion injuries is emphasized but it is likely that not all the responsible factors have yet been identified.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Athletic Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.