Cases reported "Athletic Injuries"

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1/96. Mononeuropathy of the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve in a scuba diver.

    Peripheral mononeuropathies occur only rarely in association with decompression illness. The sites previously reported to be affected are areas of potential entrapment in which a peripheral nerve traverses a confined area. In these instances, the pathophysiology has been presumed to be mechanical pressure in an enclosed space by a gas bubble. A rare case is now presented of a peripheral mononeuropathy of the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve in a scuba diver following surfacing from a 195 foot dive. This case differs from prior reports of mononeuropathy in association with decompression illness in that the affected nerve does not traverse a confined site in which mechanical compression by a gas bubble is likely. The mechanism of injury is hypothesized to be a manifestation of decompression illness with a gas bubble causing blood flow obstruction and an ischemic infarct.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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2/96. Suprascapular nerve entrapment at the spinoglenoid notch in a professional baseball pitcher.

    Suprascapular nerve injuries at the spinoglenoid notch are uncommon. The true incidence of this lesion is unknown; however, it appears to be more common in athletes who participate in sports involving overhead activities. When a patient is being evaluated for posterior shoulder pain and infraspinatus muscle weakness, electrodiagnostic studies are an essential part of the evaluation. electromyography will identify an injury to the suprascapular nerve as well as assist in localizing the site of injury. In addition, imaging studies are also indicated to help exclude other diagnoses that can mimic a suprascapular nerve injury. The initial management should consist of cessation of the aggravating activity along with an organized shoulder rehabilitation program. If the patient fails to improve with 6 months to 1 year of nonoperative management, surgical exploration of the suprascapular nerve should be considered. Release of the spinoglenoid ligament with resultant suprascapular nerve decompression may result in relief of pain and a return of normal shoulder function.
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ranking = 1.2857142857143
keywords = nerve
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3/96. optic nerve avulsion from a golfing injury.

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with optic nerve avulsion after being struck in the eye with a golf club. methods: A 10-year-old male was hit in the left eye by a golf club. The patient underwent full ophthalmoscopic evaluation and neuroimaging. RESULTS: The patient had no light perception in the left eye when first seen. Avulsion of the optic nerve with vitreous hemorrhage was apparent on examination. Computed tomographic imaging of the brain and orbits revealed no abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: optic nerve avulsion from golf-related injury is more likely to occur when the impact site is between the globe and the orbital rim. rupture of the globe is more likely to occur with direct impact to it.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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4/96. Common peroneal neuropathy due to surfing.

    Common peroneal neuropathy is uncommon in children and adolescents. In this population, it is usually caused by direct nerve injury at the fibular head level. Most commonly, the nerve is damaged during sports-related blunt trauma. Other etiologies such as hereditary neuropathies and bone tumors are much less frequent. In some cases, repetitive microtrauma to the peroneal nerve is felt to cause neuropathy. We describe the case of a teenager who developed common peroneal neuropathy in association with prolonged wave-surfing in the presence of weight loss.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = nerve
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5/96. Chronic calf pain in athletes due to sural nerve entrapment. A report of 18 cases.

    We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 13 athletes (18 limbs) who had sural nerve entrapment localized in the passage of the nerve through the superficial sural aponeurosis. There were 11 men and 2 women (average age, 43 years; range, 31 to 59). All patients reported chronic calf pain that was exacerbated during physical exertion. Delay to diagnosis averaged 9 months (range, 5 to 24). Tenderness in the calf was identified along the course of the sural nerve in all cases. In 10 patients (15 limbs) electrodiagnostic testing before surgery was positive. After failure of nonoperative treatment, surgery was conducted under local anesthesia. Neurolysis was performed by incising the superficial sural aponeurosis and the fibrous band in it through which the nerve passes. The results of the operation were evaluated in terms of residual symptoms, ability to return to the former sport, and degree of patient satisfaction. A final follow-up examination was performed an average of 14 months (range, 6 to 30) after the operation. The final result was excellent in 9 limbs (2 bilateral), good in 8 limbs (2 bilateral), and fair in 1 case. The differential diagnosis of sural nerve entrapment in athletes is discussed. Increase in sural muscle mass or development of local fibrous scar tissue compromised the sural nerve in its course through the unyielding and inextensible superficial sural aponeurosis.
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ranking = 1.4285714285714
keywords = nerve
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6/96. Tibial plateau fracture after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Complications have been described with each technique for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee, both open and arthroscopically assisted. The authors describe a case of tibial plateau fracture occurring 7 months after an ACL reconstruction using the half tunnel technique. The fracture occurred at the tibial fixation site and required open reduction with internal fixation. To our knowledge, only 2 cases of proximal tibial fracture after patellar tendon autograft ACL reconstruction have been previously reported. The authors hypothesize that patellar tendon harvesting with bone blocks and transosseous tibial tunnel can produce a "stress riser" effect and somehow act synergistically to create decreased strength at the level of proximal tibial metaphysis.
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ranking = 0.0082556809188158
keywords = block
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7/96. Ski boot compression syndrome.

    The extensor tendons and peroneal nerve can be compressed at the ankle by the tongue of the ski boot. The resulting neuritis and synovitis may be severe enough to mimick an anterior compartment syndrome. Treatment consists of conservative methods but the paresthesiae may remain for long periods of time.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = nerve
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8/96. Subacute femoral compressive neuropathy from iliacus compartment hematoma.

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic retroperitoneal hematoma in the iliacus muscle is an unusual but potentially serious cause of femoral compression neuropathy. CASE REPORT: We describe the clinical, imaging, and management features of a case of traumatic iliacus retroperitoneal hematoma with delayed manifestation of femoral neuropathy. DISCUSSION: The anatomical substrate for hematoma formation with subacute compression of the femoral nerve is emphasized. A subacute compartment syndrome with progressive edema, swelling and ischemia of iliacus compartment is suggested as the underlying cause. Early fasciotomy with or without hematoma evacuation should be considered in order to provide rapid decompression and to minimize the chance of permanent nerve injury.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = nerve
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9/96. rupture of the axillary (circumflex) nerve and artery in a champion jockey.

    rupture of the circumflex artery and nerve, without fracture or dislocation, is a rare traumatic event. Such a case is reported in a champion flat jockey who sustained blunt trauma to the shoulder after a fall during a race; the literature is also reviewed. At urgent surgical exploration, the axillary artery and nerve were repaired. The patient subsequently successfully returned to professional riding. This case highlights the difficulties in diagnosis and management.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = nerve
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10/96. exercise-induced, persistent and generalized muscle cramps. A case report.

    We are reporting on a 46-year-old man who has suffered of muscle cramps for 4 years, occurring immediately after jogging and playing tennis and lasting for 7-8 hours. Repeated neurological, orthopedic, internal medical and endocrinological examinations showed no pathological findings. Physiotherapy, supplementation of fluids and electrolytes had no effect, nor did medication therapy with muscle relaxants. During spiroergometry without medication, there was an overproportional increase of heart rate and respiratory rate with delayed pCO2 increase after exercise with otherwise normal blood gas levels. This reaction was considerably reduced during spiroergometry under beta-blockade (metoprolol 100 mg); at the same time, the muscle cramps could no longer be induced. Both excessive respiratory regulation and direct hyperadrenergic stimulation should be discussed as the primary cause of the muscle cramps. According to recent findings, b-blockers with intrinsic sympathocomimetic activity should be avoided in therapy.
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ranking = 0.016511361837632
keywords = block
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