Cases reported "Bacteremia"

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1/146. shoulder girdle abscess due to streptococcus agalactiae complicating esophageal dilation.

    bacteremia can result very unusually in significant complications after esophageal dilation. Procedure-related mucosal trauma may be a determinant, whereas pathogenic bacteria primarily originate from the patient's oropharyngeal flora. We describe an unusual case of streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia and shoulder girdle abscess complicating esophageal bougienage. Consideration of specific risk factors and use of scrupulous procedural technique are warranted and will likely reduce pyogenic sequelae.
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2/146. Acute neonatal scalp abscess and E coli bacteremia in the ED.

    An atypical presentation of newborn scalp abscess is described in a 9-day-old infant. The infant appeared nontoxic upon presentation on day 9 after birth with a scalp abscess and escherichia coli bacteremia. The infant had been admitted from the emergency department to the newborn intensive care unit on day 4 after birth with the same diagnosis; however, she was discharged within hours without treatment. This case report demonstrates the subtle clinical features, presentation, microbiology, and appropriate emergency department management of neonatal scalp abscesses.
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3/146. Fatal case due to methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in an AIDS patient.

    We describe the first known case of a fatal infection with small colony variants of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in a patient with AIDS. Recovered from three blood cultures as well as from a deep hip abscess, these variants may have resulted from long-term antimicrobial therapy with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for prophylaxis of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.
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4/146. edwardsiella tarda bacteraemia--complicated by acute pancreatitis and pyomyoma.

    edwardsiella tarda (E. tarda) has recently become recognized as a pathogen in humans. Here we report a new case of E. tarda bacteraemia complicated by acute pancreatitis and pyomyoma. A 46-year-old female came to our emergency room complaining of sudden onset of left upper quadrant pain and vomiting for the previous few hours after drinking three bottles of wine. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed multiple biliary stones, acute pancreatitis with extensive inflammatory change, and a large uterine myoma. fever, watery diarrhoea, and mild suprapubic discomfort with vaginal spotting were noted soon after admission. The patient's blood cultures yielded E. tarda and symptoms subsided after antibiotic therapy. fever and severe suprapubic pain with rebound tenderness developed 12 days later. Repeat abdominal CT scan revealed an enlarged uterine myoma with central necrosis. The patient subsequently underwent anterior total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, revealing a uterine myoma with infarction and abscess formation. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 1 week later.
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5/146. Fatal clostridium sordellii ischio-rectal abscess with septicaemia complicating ultrasound-guided transrectal prostate biopsy.

    clostridium sordellii is a Gram-positive spore-forming anaerobic bacillus rarely encountered in human infection. A case of C. sordellii ischio-rectal abscess with rapidly fatal septicaemia is described which complicated ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy of the prostate, despite ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. Neither C. sordellii ischio-rectal abscess nor ischio-rectal abscess complicating transrectal biopsy have been reported previously. Judging from our experience and the reviewed literature, the addition of prophylactic anti-anaerobe drugs should be strongly considered until an optimal prophylactic regimen will be defined by randomized controlled trials.
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6/146. porphyromonas gingivalis bacteremia and subhepatic abscess after renal transplantation: a case report.

    A uremic patient developed subhepatic abscess, porphyromonas gingivalis bacteremia and cytomegalovirus viremia after a renal transplantation in mainland china. P. gingivalis infection has been reported to cause gingivitis and periodontitis. bacteremia due to P. gingivalis, however, has not been reported in the literature. We report herein a case of subhepatic abscess and bacteremia due to P. gingivalis in a renal transplant recepient who was treated successfully with the well functioning renal graft.
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7/146. bacteremia caused by a strain of desulfovibrio related to the provisionally named desulfovibrio fairfieldensis.

    Eight isolates of desulfovibrio spp. have been obtained over 5 years from abdominal or brain abscesses or blood. Seven isolates were part of a mixed flora [corrected]. One strain was isolated in pure culture from the blood of a patient with peritonitis of appendicular origin. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequences, this strain was close to desulfovibrio fairfieldensis. The present report describes the fourth isolate of this recently described species to be isolated in pure culture or as a predominant part of the flora and to be associated with infectious processes. Thus, D. fairfieldensis may possess a higher pathogenic potential than other desulfovibrio species.
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8/146. bacteremia, meningitis, and brain abscesses in a hospitalized infant: complications of pseudomonas aeruginosa conjunctivitis.

    This report describes a preterm infant hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit who developed pseudomonas aeruginosa conjunctivitis associated with bacteremia, meningitis, and multiple brain abscesses. P. aeruginosa conjunctivitis can rapidly progress to an invasive eye infection, such as corneal ulceration or endophthalmitis, leading to poor vision or blindness. Progression of this infection may lead to systemic disease. However, as illustrated in this report, P. aeruginosa conjunctivitis may be associated with the development of systemic complications such as bacteremia and meningitis in the absence of invasive eye disease. P. aeruginosa is a relatively common cause of conjunctivitis in hospitalized preterm and low birth weight infants. Given the severity of the ocular and systemic complications of Pseudomonas conjunctivitis, clinicians are reminded that prompt detection and treatment of neonatal conjunctivitis is critical.
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9/146. Retroperitoneal abscess and bacteremia due to mycoplasma hominis in a polytraumatized man.

    We report a case of a retroperitoneal abscess due to mycoplasma hominis in a young polytraumatized man who developed septicemia under treatment with rifampin and flucloxacillin. M. hominis was recovered from blood cultures as well as from the abscess near the left iliac spine. After 10 days of therapy with clindamycin the patient improved, and intraoperatively taken swabs were culture negative but still positive by PCR.
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keywords = abscess
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10/146. Beware of short-course therapy for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia without a removable cause.

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has long been known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. The optimal treatment of this disease has evolved over the years. Recently, criteria have been established for the use of shorter courses of antibiotic therapy in certain patients, most notably those with an easily removed source of the bacteremia. We present the case of a 55-year-old man with S aureus bacteremia unrelated to an intravascular device. He was treated with "short-course" antibiotic therapy, and lumbar diskitis and an epidural abscess developed.
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