Cases reported "Bacteremia"

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1/85. Central line sepsis in a child due to a previously unidentified mycobacterium.

    A rapidly growing mycobacterium similar to strains in the present mycobacterium fortuitum complex (M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, and M. fortuitum third biovariant complex [sorbitol positive and sorbitol negative]) was isolated from a surgically placed central venous catheter tip and three cultures of blood from a 2-year-old child diagnosed with metastatic hepatoblastoma. The organism's unique phenotypic profile and ribotype patterns differed from those of the type and reference strains of the M. fortuitum complex and indicate that this organism may represent a new pathogenic taxon.
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ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
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2/85. ochrobactrum anthropi bacteremia.

    ochrobactrum anthropi (O. anthropi ), formerly known as achromobacter CDC group Vd, is a gram-negative bacillus that is aerobic, oxidase producing, and nonlactose fermenting. This organism has been found in environmental and hospital water sources and has pathogenic potential in humans. Most reports in the literature of O. anthropi bacteremia are associated with intravenous line infections. We describe a case of bacteremia with O. anthropi in a 33-month-old boy with acute osteomyelitis. O. anthropi bacteremia also has been reported in immunocompromised hosts. Rarely, O. anthropi has been a cause of soft tissue or bone infection.
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ranking = 1.1407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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3/85. Fatal clostridium sordellii ischio-rectal abscess with septicaemia complicating ultrasound-guided transrectal prostate biopsy.

    clostridium sordellii is a Gram-positive spore-forming anaerobic bacillus rarely encountered in human infection. A case of C. sordellii ischio-rectal abscess with rapidly fatal septicaemia is described which complicated ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy of the prostate, despite ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. Neither C. sordellii ischio-rectal abscess nor ischio-rectal abscess complicating transrectal biopsy have been reported previously. Judging from our experience and the reviewed literature, the addition of prophylactic anti-anaerobe drugs should be strongly considered until an optimal prophylactic regimen will be defined by randomized controlled trials.
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ranking = 1.1407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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4/85. Bacterial complications of strongyloidiasis: streptococcus bovis meningitis.

    We report the case of a 64-year-old veteran who had streptococcus bovis meningitis as a result of a long latent strongyloides infection that became acute when he was treated with prednisone. We reviewed 38 reported cases of serious bacterial infections associated with strongyloidiasis. patients most frequently had nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Of these 38 patients, 21 (55%) had meningitis, and 28 (73%) had bacteremia that was polymicrobial in 3 cases (8%). Other sites of infection included lung, bone marrow, ascites, mitral valve, and lymph node. Most infections were due to enteric gram-negative bacteria. There is one previously reported case of S bovis meningitis. Thirty-four of the patients (89%) were immunosuppressed; 21 of these (55%) were taking pharmacologic doses of adrenal corticosteroids. Thirty-three of the 38 (87%) patients died. patients with enteric bacterial infection without an obvious cause should be tested for the presence of strongyloidiasis.
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ranking = 2.2313586798114
keywords = bovis
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5/85. bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis due to streptococcus bovis.

    The diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis is easily missed, especially in the elderly in whom clinical signs of bacteremia might not be manifest. Spontaneously occurring disc-space infection in adults often has an insidious presentation. The infecting microorganism can be difficult to identify. Although discitis due to streptococcus bovis is occasionally found, it is often difficult to fully confirm the diagnosis. Here, a case of vertebral osteomyelitis due to this microorganism is reported.
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ranking = 1.8594655665095
keywords = bovis
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6/85. vibrio parahemolyticus bacteremia: case report.

    vibrio parahemolyticus (V. parahemolyticus) is a halophilic gram-negative bacillus that lives in the ocean. It is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in taiwan and sometimes produces soft tissue infections, but it is rarely a cause of bacteremia. There have been only 11 cases reported in the literature. Most of the cases involved a history of ingestion of seafood or exposure to seawater. In addition, those patients were all immunosuppressed, especially with leukemia and cirrhosis. We report a 60-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis c and adrenal insufficiency. He developed V. parahemolyticus bacteremia following ingestion of seafood one week prior to admission. His condition was complicated with neck and right lower leg soft tissue infection, as well as multiple organ failure. The patient survived after intravenous ceftazidime, oral doxycycline, and surgical debridement. To our knowledge, this is the 12th reported cases on medline, and the second bacteremic case in taiwan. After reviewing the literature, we suggest that all patients with immunosuppressed conditions or adrenal insufficiency should eat foods that are well cooked and avoid raw seafood. Moreover, when patients who are at risk to develop fever, diarrhea, and soft tissue infection after ingestion of seafood, V. parahemolyticus infection should be suspected. All culture specimens should be inoculated on Vibrios selective media.
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ranking = 1.1407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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7/85. Cluster of cases of mycobacterium chelonae bacteraemia.

    mycobacterium chelonae was isolated from the blood of four immunosuppressed patients over a period of 10 weeks. Three patients had intravascular catheters in situ and the other had a biliary stent. All presented with recurrent fever despite treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. blood cultures using standard bacteriological medium yielded a gram-positive bacillus from each patient. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of these cultures demonstrated a branching acid-fast bacillus that was subsequently identified as mycobacterium chelonae in each case. The isolates were sensitive to clarithromycin and, although success of treatment with clarithromycin monotherapy has been variable, this antibiotic combined with removal of the intravascular catheters was used to treat those three patients. The treatment was successful with no recurrence of symptoms after 12 months of follow-up. The patient with the biliary stent died soon after mycobacterium chelonae was isolated. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry analysis indicated the isolates were of two distinct strains. Radiological insertion of the Hickman lines and biliary stent was implicated epidemiologically as the source of infection.
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ranking = 2.2814968471751
keywords = bacillus
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8/85. Infective endocarditis and septic embolization with ochrobactrum anthropi: case report and review of literature.

    ochrobactrum anthropi, previously known as CDC group Vd, is an aerobic, Gram-negative bacillus of low virulence that occasionally causes human infection. We describe a case of infective endocarditis with O. anthropi complicated by septic embolization. A review of all the literature reported cases of O. anthropi infection is presented and categorized into 'Central line related', 'Transplant related' and "Other pyogenic infections". mortality appears to be related to the underlying disease state, rather than the organism.
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ranking = 1.1407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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9/85. bacteremia and possible endocarditis caused by moraxella phenylpyruvica.

    moraxella phenylpyruvica, a gram-negative coccobacillus, is usually considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. Only a few cases of invasive disease caused by this organism were reported in the 1970s. We report a well-documented case of bacteremia and possible endocarditis due to M phenylpyruvica in a previously healthy man.
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ranking = 1.1407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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10/85. weissella confusa (basonym: Lactobacillus confusus) bacteremia: a case report.

    Infection with Lactobacillus is rare, and only a handful of species have been identified as being clinically significant: lactobacillus casei, lactobacillus rhamnosus, and lactobacillus leichmannii. The literature contains one case report of bacteremia caused by weissella confusa (basonym: Lactobacillus confusus), but the clinical significance of the infection was unclear. We describe a case of W. confusa bacteremia in a 46-year-old man with a history of abdominal aortic dissection and repair. This procedure was complicated by gut ischemia, which necessitated massive small bowel resection. He subsequently developed short-bowel syndrome, which required him to have total parenteral nutrition. He later developed an enterococcus faecalis aortic valve endocarditis that required a coronary artery bypass graft and aortic root replacement with homograft and 6 weeks of intravenous ampicillin and gentamicin. Three months prior to his most recent admission, he was diagnosed with klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia and candidemia. At the present admission, he had fever (T(max), 39.5 degrees C) and chills of 2 days' duration and was admitted to the intensive care unit because of hemodynamic instability. blood cultures grew K. pneumoniae and W. confusa in four of four blood culture bottles (both aerobe and anaerobe bottles). Imaging studies failed to find any foci of infection. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed no vegetations. A culture of the patient's Hickman catheter tip was negative. The patient was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin. His condition improved, and he was discharged home, where he completed 4 weeks of piperacillin-tazobactam therapy. Lactobacillemia seldom results in mortality; however, it may be a marker of a serious underlying disease. It is usually seen in patients who have a complex medical history or in patients who receive multiple antibiotics. Lactobacillus spp. are generally associated with polymicrobial infections, and when isolated from the blood, they need to be considered possible pathogens. The presence of a vancomycin-resistant, gram-positive coccobacilli on a blood culture should alert clinicians to the possibility of bacteremia caused by W. confusa or other small gram-positive rods.
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ranking = 11.407484235876
keywords = bacillus
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