Cases reported "Bacteremia"

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1/32. serratia marcescens bacteremia after carotid endarterectomy and coronary artery bypass grafting.

    serratia marcescens is a common, water-borne hospital colonizer. Respiratory secretions, wounds, and urine are frequently recognized areas of Serratia colonization. Serratia bacteremias usually occur nosocomially and are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Serratia bacteremias may be primary or secondary from an identifiable source. Hospital-acquired S marcescens bacteremias have no known source in half of the cases. We present a case of nosocomial primary S marcescens bacteremia in a surgical patient successfully treated with levofloxacin.
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keywords = wound
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2/32. Primary vibrio vulnificus bacteremia in a liver transplant recipient after ingestion of raw oysters: caveat emptor.

    vibrio vulnificus is responsible for severe infections in chronically ill patients. Organ transplant recipients are also at risk for severe infections due to V vulnificus. We report here the first case of V. vulnificus primary bacteremia due to raw shellfish consumption in a liver transplant recipient. All transplant patients should be cautioned against consuming uncooked seafood and warned about the risk of severe vibrio infections from seemingly innocuous wounds acquired in a salt water environment.
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3/32. The use of simultaneous free latissimus dorsi tissue transfers for reconstruction of bilateral upper extremities in a case of purpura fulminans.

    We report a case of extensive purpura fulminans destroying the soft tissue over the posterior aspect of both elbows. Simultaneous, bilateral free latissimus dorsi muscle transfers were used to close both wounds in a single procedure. The wounds resulting from severe purpura fulminans can be extensive and limb threatening. The simultaneous transfer of 2 free flaps can provide expeditious soft tissue repair while minimizing the risk of repeat anesthesia in these critically ill patients. We found that certain details concerning planning and performing the procedure fostered its successful outcome.
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keywords = wound
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4/32. Aeromonas wound infection in burns.

    Infection of burn patients with the Aeromonas organism is an uncommon event. This paper documents four cases of aeromonas hydrophila and one case involving both A. hydrophila and A. caviae occurring in burn patients between 1990 and 1998 at the Royal Brisbane Hospital burns unit. The organism was isolated from either skin swabs, tissue samples, blood cultures or cultured lines. In all patients there was a history of immersion in water immediately post burn. There is one case of invasion and destruction of deeper tissues and one fatality. Appropriate management requires a high index of suspicion if a history of immersion in untreated water post burn is given and the treatment involves aggressive excision and antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 594.45294036587
keywords = wound infection, wound
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5/32. A case of fatal food-borne septicemia: can family physicians provide prevention?

    BACKGROUND: vibrio vulnificus, a common bacteria found in undercooked seafood and seawater, is the leading cause of food-borne death in florida. Fatal cases of V vulnificus infection have also been reported in most states. methods: The literature was searched using the key words "vibrio vulnificus," "septicemia," "wound infections," "seafood," "immunocompromise," and "patient education." A case of fatal V vulnificus septicemia is described. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: V vulnificus, part of the natural flora of temperate coastal waters and one of the most abundant microorganisms found in seawater, has been isolated from waters off the Gulf, Pacific, and Atlantic coasts of the united states. Infections in noncoastal regions have been traced to consumption of seafood derived from Gulf Coast waters. seawater exposure and consumption of inadequately cooked seafood are routes most commonly associated with V vulnificus infection. Exposure to V vulnificus is life-threatening for chronically ill or immunocompromised patients, who are most likely to develop fatal septicemia. Currently a combination of doxycycline and intravenous ceftazidime is recommended treatment. mortality rates from V vulnificus continue to be high in immunocompromised patients. family physicians can help prevent this outcome by counseling high-risk patients.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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6/32. Group F streptococcal bacteremia complicating a Bartholin's abscess.

    BACKGROUND: Group F streptococci are gram-positive cocci typically isolated from wound infections and abscesses. bacteremia with group F streptococcus is uncommon, and the lower gynecologic tract has not been reported as a source. We report a case of a Bartholin's abscess leading to group F streptococcal bacteremia. CASE: A 31-year-old female noted fever and rigors 30 min after manipulation of a 3-day-old vulvar abscess. An empty Bartholin's gland abscess was found on examination, and blood cultures grew beta-hemolytic group F streptococci. The patient was treated with ampicillin/sulbactam, symptoms improved, and follow-up blood cultures revealed no growth. CONCLUSION: Group F streptococci are known to inhabit various body sites and have a predilection for forming abscesses; however, bacteremia is infrequent. They have occasionally been identified in true infections of the genitourinary tract but only very rarely in Bartholin's abscesses. This case of group F streptococcal bacteremia following self-drainage of a Bartholin's abscess constitutes the first such description in the medical literature.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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7/32. bacteremia by Dermabacter hominis, a rare pathogen.

    Dermabacter hominis is a gram-positive, catalase-positive, glucose-fermenting rod, which, as it grows forms small greyish-white colonies with a characteristic pungent odor. Previously known as coryneform Centers for disease Control and Prevention groups 3 and 5, it was catalogued as D. hominis in 1994. Various strains isolated in blood cultures, abscesses, or wounds in the 1970s were retrospectively characterized in referral centers as D. hominis. In this report we describe two patients with severe underlying pathology who developed bacteremias by D. hominis within the context of their clinical pictures.
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8/32. Successful medical management of multifocal psoas abscess following cesarean section: report of a case and review of the literature.

    The psoas abscess is a rare complication in obstetric and gynaecology. Two types of psoas abscess are recognized. The primary psoas abscess is generally following haematogenous dissemination of an infectious agent and the source is usually occult. The most frequently isolated pathogen is staphylococcus aureus. On the other hand, the secondary abscess is the result of local extension of an infectious process near the psoas muscle. We report the case of a patient who develops a bacteremia from an infected cesarean section wound. The complications were thigh and psoas abscesses with left sacroiliitis. Medical management with prolonged antibiotherapy permit clinical, biological and radiological improvement. Although it required a long hospital stay, medical treatment alone was effective. More experience is required to determine which therapeutic option: medical treatment and/or surgery, is the best choice for this type of complication.
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9/32. vibrio vulnificus septicemia and leg ulcer.

    vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacteria that can cause septicemia, wound infection, or a self-limiting diarrhea. This infection typically presents as an extremely virulent infection in patients with underlying liver disease 1 to 2 days after exposure. We report a case of V vulnificus septicemia, cellulitis, and leg ulceration in a patient who had symptoms develop after exposure to brackish water (19 days before admission) or after ingestion of raw oysters (10 days before admission). The longest incubation period previously reported is 6 days. The diagnosis was made from identification of the bacteria from blood cultures. No organisms were seen or grown in culture from the skin biopsy specimen, which showed epidermal necrosis and dermal and subcutaneous neutrophilic abscess. We review 13 cases of V vulnificus septicemia and leg ulcers and their approximate incubation time.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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10/32. Infected compartment syndrome after acupuncture.

    We present a case of septicaemia and compartment syndrome of the leg in a diabetic patient, following acupuncture to his calf. An emergency decompression fasciotomy was performed on the patient and gram-positive cocci were grown from the posterior compartment wound swab cultures and group A streptococcus from his blood cultures. He remained in the Intensive Therapy Unit postoperatively, requiring inotropic support and intravenous antibiotics for his septicaemia. We would like to remind acupuncturists, to consider the possibility of heightened risks in immunocompromised patients.
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