Cases reported "Bacteremia"

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11/32. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) bacteraemia associated with Hickman catheters.

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is a potential pathogen that may infect patients who have major medical illnesses, especially those who are undergoing surgery or have indwelling venous catheters in situ. Flavimonas oryzihabitans has been isolated from a wide range of body sites, and the portals of entry are major wounds or implanted foreign materials. We report two cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteraemia associated with the use of Hickman catheters for administration of the patients' chemotherapeutic agents. However, a common source for these infections could not be demonstrated.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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12/32. Infective endocarditis due to capnocytophaga canimorsus.

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with severe mitral regurgitation due to infective endocarditis caused by a rare zoonotic microorganism (capnocytophaga canimorsus). She had had a rheumatic mitral endocarditis successfully treated with antibiotics when she was 13 years old. She arrived to our attention for a fever of unknown origin. She had been bitten by her dog and medicated the wound herself. About 2 weeks later she developed a fever with values up to 39.5 degrees C. blood cultures were initially negative but in view of her particular history (dog bite), the samples were sent to a specialized center where a capnocytophaga canimorsus (a commensal bacterium contained in the saliva of dogs and cats) infection sensitive to ceftriaxone was detected. The antibiotic therapy was consequently modified and the patient's fever resolved. At echocardiography a mild mitral stenosis with severe regurgitation (3-4 /4 ) was detected. We planned surgical mitral repair but the operative findings clearly showed the need for mitral replacement and a 29 mm size bileaflet mechanical prosthesis was implanted. The postoperative course was regular and the patient was discharged on the fifth day. We highlight the importance of a careful history and correct work-up for the diagnosis and treatment of false negative blood culture endocarditis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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13/32. clostridium septicum bacteremia without gas gangrene as a late consequence of a contaminated wound.

    BACKGROUND: clostridium septicum is an unusual human pathogen associated with colorectal malignancy and gas gangrene. methods: A case compilation and literature review are presented. RESULTS: We report the case of an individual with a comminuted tibial fracture complicated by a superficial surgical site infection with C. septicum nine weeks after the original injury and internal fixation, which was complicated by a secondary bacteremia. CONCLUSIONS: This is a unique case in the literature, but it is suggested that the use of cephalosporins as prophylaxis for contaminated wounds may be inferior to penicillins to prevent clostridial infections.
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ranking = 5
keywords = wound
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14/32. First case of septicemia due to a strain belonging to enteric group 58 (enterobacteriaceae) and its designation as Averyella dalhousiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., based on analysis of strains from 20 additional cases.

    When enteric group 58 was first described as a distinct new group of enterobacteriaceae in 1985, there were only five known human isolates: four from wounds and one from feces. In 1996, we investigated the first blood isolate of enteric group 58, a case of sepsis in a 33-year-old woman receiving total parenteral nutrition. Fifteen additional clinical isolates have since been identified at CDC, including several recognized from a collection of "unidentified" strains dating back to 1973. All strains were characterized with a standard set of 49 biochemical tests used for enterobacteriaceae, and the results were analyzed to determine phenotypic relatedness and best taxonomic fit. Antibiograms were determined as a taxonomic tool. Original identifications provided by submitting laboratories encompassed a wide variety of enterobacteriaceae, including 14 species in eight genera, the most common being Enterobacter spp., salmonella spp., serratia spp., kluyvera spp., or escherichia spp. Enteric group 58 strains have been most frequently isolated from traumatic injuries, fractures, and wounds and rarely from feces. Defining its clinical significance and distinguishing infection from colonization requires further study, but our case report indicates that serious systemic infection can occur. The vernacular name enteric group 58 was used from 1985 to 2004. In this paper, we formally name it Averyella dalhousiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., on the basis of its unique phenotype and its unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. These data indicate that enteric group 58 is not closely related to any of the existing genera or species of enterobacteriaceae. The type strain is designated CDC 9501--97, and a phenotypic definition is given based on all 21 strains.
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ranking = 2
keywords = wound
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15/32. Septicaemia secondary to vibrio vulnificus cellulitis.

    vibrio vulnificus is a naturally occurring, salt-water bacteria found in estuarine and coastal waters worldwide. It prefers low salinity and warm water temperatures for optimum growth. Infection from vibrio vulnificus is uncommon, although it has been reported from many locations (e.g. southern united states of America, israel, republic of korea, japan, taiwan, spain, turkey). It can be serious and life threatening, causing septicaemia and wound infections. This paper reports a case of septicaemia secondary to vibrio vulnificus cellulitis in an elderly woman. The infection was acquired after wading in a coastal lagoon with a pre-existing superficial leg wound.
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ranking = 149.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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16/32. Atypical manifestation of vibrio vulnificus septicaemia.

    vibrio vulnificus is a Gram-negative marine bacterium that may cause local wound infection, gastroenteritis, or septicaemia. Fatal septicaemia usually presents with fever, shock, and large haemorrhagic bullae on the legs. This report is about a man who had severe V. vulnificus septicaemia but presented with atypical features of leg pain and diffuse purpuric skin lesions. V. vulnificus septicaemia should be suspected if the following are present: septic shock, leg pains associated with diffuse purpuric skin lesions, recent consumption of raw seafood, and a past medical history of liver cirrhosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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17/32. Infections with pseudomonas paucimobilis: report of four cases and review.

    pseudomonas paucimobilis (formerly CDC group IIK, biotype 1) is a strictly aerobic, nonfermenting, oxidase- and catalase-positive, gram-negative bacillus that is widely distributed in water and soil. Its name derives from the difficulty encountered in demonstrating its motility, even in liquid media. This microorganism is responsible for two types of infection in humans: sporadic or community-acquired infections, probably of endogenous or environmental origin (bacteremia, meningitis, urinary tract infection, and wound infection); and outbreaks of nosocomial infection associated with the contamination of sterile fluids employed in hospitals. We present four cases of infection caused by P. paucimobilis (two of bacteremia, one of leg ulcer infection, and one of cervical adenitis). The majority of infections produced by P. paucimobilis have a good prognosis; no deaths related to this entity have been reported in the literature. The published results of susceptibility tests suggest that the aminoglycosides (either alone or in combination with a beta-lactam antibiotic) or the quinolone may be the agents of choice in the treatment of these infections.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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18/32. A late sternal wound infection caused by hematogenous spread of bacteria.

    A 56-year-old man presented with a sternotomy wound infection 6 months after coronary artery bypass grafting. The organism responsible was group B beta-hemolytic streptococcus. This organism was simultaneously cultured from an infected diabetic ulcer on the patient's foot as well as from a total knee prosthesis. The streptococcus apparently spread hematogenously to the sternum, an extremely rare cause of sternotomy wound infection.
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ranking = 891.67941054881
keywords = wound infection, wound
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19/32. streptococcus milleri as a cause of antecubital abscess and bacteremia in intravenous drug abusers.

    S milleri should be added to the list of organisms producing wound infections in parenteral drug addicts. Recovery of "viridans streptococci" from an antecubital aspirate should prompt the clinician to request speciation, examine closely for abscess formation, and anticipate prolonged antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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20/32. Non-urinary tract infections caused by multiply antibiotic-resistant corynebacterium urealyticum.

    Five patients with non-urinary tract infections caused by corynebacterium urealyticum were seen during an 8-year period at a university hospital in Madrid. bacteremia (one case) and wound infections (four cases) were the most relevant features of these cases. Treatment with vancomycin, surgery, and supportive measures contributed to a favorable outcome for four of the five patients.
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ranking = 148.61323509147
keywords = wound infection, wound
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