Cases reported "Bacterial Infections"

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11/151. Medical treatment of a central vein suppurative thrombosis with cerebral metastatic abscesses in a burned child.

    A 2-year-old girl admitted with third degree burns (35% TBSA) received 7 weeks poly-antibiotic therapy combined with heparin for a severe methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus sepsis with multiple metastatic abscesses (lung, skin, brain), from a suppurative thrombophlebitis of the right jugularis interna, extended to the axillary and cava superior veins. Surgical treatment was contraindicated by the local extension. The child was discharged without major neurological sequelae 3 months after admission.
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ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
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12/151. Intracranial complications of frontal sinusitis in children: Pott's puffy tumor revisited.

    The objective of the present study is to describe the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial complications of frontal sinusitis (Pott's puffy tumor) in a series of pediatric patients at our institution. A rare entity, Pott's puffy tumor has been reported in only 21 pediatric cases in the literature of the antibiotic era. The hospital records and radiographic files at Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital, Cleveland, ohio, USA, over the previous 16 years were retrospectively reviewed in a search for patients with the diagnosis of Pott's puffy tumor, defined as scalp swelling and associated intracranial infection. There were 6 male patients and 1 female patient. Ages ranged from 11 to 18 years (median 14.5 years). Intracranial infections consisted of epidural abscess in 5 patients, subdural empyema in 4 and brain abscess in 1. Intraoperative cultures grew anaerobic organisms in 1 patient, microaerophilic streptococcus in 5 patients, klebsiella species in 1 patient and streptococcus pneumoniae in another. All patients presented with frontal scalp swelling, and other common symptoms included headache, fever, nasal drainage and frontal sinus tenderness. Five patients were treated with antibiotics prior to their presentation. Four patients presented with neurologic decompensation characterized by varying degrees of hemiparesis, obtundation, pupillary dilatation or aphasia. All patients underwent craniotomy and evacuation of the intracranial infection. Even severely impaired patients demonstrated full neurologic recovery. Despite the widespread use of antibiotics, neurosurgical complications of sinusitis continue to occur. A high degree of suspicion, along with prompt neurosurgical intervention and the use of appropriate antibiotics, can result in favorable outcomes in even the sickest patients.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = abscess
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13/151. Anaerobic thyroid abscess from a thyroid cyst after fine-needle aspiration.

    BACKGROUND: Anaerobic abscess formation within a thyroid cyst is rare but still possible, although aerobic thyroid abscess formation in the thyroid gland after fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has been observed in immunocompromised patients. methods: This study describes the clinical manifestations, thyroid echography, cytologic finding, culture outcome, and treatment course of an anaerobic abscess formation within a thyroid cyst after FNA in a healthy subject. RESULTS: A 53-year-old male subject had rapid enlargement of a left thyroid cyst develop after second FNA. Frank pus was obtained through third FNA. The culture outcome was propionibacterium acnes, which was rich in saliva and one of the pathogens causing periodontitis and gingivitis. After adequate antimicrobial therapy, the abscess gradually diminished. CONCLUSIONS: This article reported, for the first time, on the formation of an anaerobic thyroid abscess after FNA in a healthy subject. We recommended careful aseptic procedure and adequate isolation processes, such as wearing a mask to avoid an unfavorable outcome as a result of a bacterial infection.
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ranking = 1.8
keywords = abscess
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14/151. Laparoscopic management of abdominopelvic abscesses in tropical pyomyositis.

    Tropical pyomyositis is a suppurative infectious disease of skeletal muscles. The most common causative organism is staphylococcus aureus. Penicillin-resistant strains are frequently encountered. Abscesses may develop in muscle groups or body cavities remotely located from one another. We report a case of tropical pyomyositis presenting as a suppurative process in the left foreleg. Further workup, including CT scanning, demonstrated large, multi-loculated intraabdominal and pelvic abscesses. The abdominal and pelvic components were managed by laparoscopic exploration and drainage. This is the first known report of laparoscopic management of abdominopelvic abscesses associated with tropical pyomyositis.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = abscess
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15/151. Recovery of anaerobic bacteria from a glossal abscess in an adolescent.

    Glossal abscess is infrequent in children. Anaerobic bacteria are rarely recovered from this infection and never have been reported in children or adolescents. A 15-year-old patient presented with a tongue abscess following trauma. Aspirate of the abscess yielded polymicrobial anaerobic flora: prevotella melaninogenica, fusobacterium nucleatum, and peptostreptococcus micros. The patient recovered following incision and drainage and 14 days of antimicrobial therapy with clindamycin. This report illustrates the recovery of anaerobic bacteria from glossal abscess in an adolescent.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = abscess
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16/151. Gas-containing otogenic brain abscess.

    BACKGROUND: Gas-containing brain abscesses are very rare. Two mechanisms may be responsible for the presence of intracavitary gas: bacterial fermentation or penetration through an abnormal communication between the exterior and the intracranium. The need to search for this potential communication is considered an indication for open surgery. We report the case of a surgically treated gas-containing brain abscess originating from an undiagnosed chronic otitis media. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 54-year-old man developed acute neurologic deterioration, becoming comatose within 24 hours. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a gas-containing cystic mass in the right temporal lobe. Urgent surgical decompression revealed the presence of an abscess, which was excised. During the same surgery, we performed a radical mastoidectomy, removing a previously undiagnosed attic cholesteatoma. Neither procedure revealed a discontinuity of the floor of the middle cranial fossa. Cultures grew a mixed flora. Antibiotics were administered for 6 weeks. The patient made a complete neurologic recovery. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates that otogenic brain abscesses may contain gas due to fermentation of nonclostridial bacteria.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = abscess
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17/151. Bypass enteritis. A new complication of jejunoileal bypass for obesity.

    Four patients who had jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity had increased frequency of diarrhea, diffuse abdominal tenderness and distention, and fever to 104 degrees F. Roentgenographic studies disclosed multiple distended loops in the bypassed bowel with few air fluid levels. Two of these patients underwent operation for suspected peritonitis from abscess or obstruction. No abscess or mechanical obstruction was found. The bypassed bowel contained many subserosal gas-filled blebs. The remaining two patients were treated with antibiotics and showed prompt improvement. "Bypass enteritis" must be considered in the postoperative period in patients undergoing surgery for morbid obesity. It responds to antibiotics and appropriate electrolyte therapy. The presumed factor is overgrowth of enteric bacteria in the distal portion of the bypassed bowel. Accurate diagnosis will obviate the need for surgical exploration to exclude peritonitis.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = abscess
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18/151. Anaerobic infections in surgery: clinical review.

    Anaerobic bacteria are being recognized with increasing frequency as important micro-organisms in surgical infections. clostridium, Bacteriodes, Fusobacterium, and peptostreptococcus are the clinically prominent pathological anaerobes. All are commensals and, consequently, most anaerobic infections are endogenous in origin. In the colon, anaerobes are 1,000 times more prevalent than aerobes. This has important implications regarding the management of gastrointestinal tract operations and the treatment of infections originating from the bowel. Typical anaerobic infections include gas gangrene, brain abscess, oral infections, putrid lung abscesses, intra-abdominal abscesses, and wound infections following gynecologic and bowel surgery, perirectal abscesses, postabortal infections, and septic thrombophlebitis. Infections with anaerobic organisms must be suspected when there is feculent odor and/or gas production following gynecologic or bowel surgery, when there are organisms on gram staining but no growth on aerobic cultures, or when septicemia is associated with repeatedly negative blood cultures. debridement and drainage constitute the main stay of treatment. All anaerobes are sensitive to chloramphenicol and clindamycin and all but bacteroides fragils are sensitive to penicillin. Identification of anaerobes requires proper specimen sampling, immediate culturing on prereduced media, and careful gram staining of clinical material. The frequency of anaerobic organisms in surgical infections generally is not recognized by many surgeons; their importance needs to be stressed in the future.
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ranking = 0.80391229123736
keywords = abscess, intra-abdominal
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19/151. Septic complications of pancreatitis.

    Over an 11-year period 693 patients with acute pancreatitis and 317 with chronic pancreatitis were seen at the Harbor General Hospital. review of these cases revealed 9 patients with primary pancreatic lesser sac abscess and 11 with secondary abscess. The appropriate management for pancreatic abscess, whether primary or secondary, is early recognition and drainage; multiple drainage procedures may be necessary. Broad spectrum antibodies appear to be helpful and should be used until cultures indicate more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Successful management involves prolonged hospitalization, but contrary to previous reports the success rate is surprisingly high. Eight out of 9 patients with primary abscess and 8 out of 11 patients with secondary abscess survived.
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ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
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20/151. psoas abscess: the spine as a primary source of infection.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report, literature review, discussion. OBJECTIVES: To emphasize the role of the spine as primary source of infection for psoas abscess. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: spine-associated psoas abscesses increase with more frequent invasive procedures of the spine and recurring tuberculosis in industrialized countries. Diagnosis is often delayed by misinterpretation as arthritis, joint infection, or urologic or abdominal disorders. methods: We present six cases of psoas abscesses associated with spinal infections that were treated in our hospital from January to December 2001. Diagnostic and treatment concepts are discussed. RESULTS: Our data emphasize the importance of the spine as primary source of infection and suggest an increase in the incidence of secondary psoas abscess. Treatment includes open surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy. In patients with high operative risk and uniloculated abscess, a CT-guided percutaneous abscess drainage can be sufficient. It is essential to combine abscess drainage with causative treatment of the primary infectious focus. Related to the spine, this includes treatment of spondylodiscitis or implant infection after spinal surgery. Usually, several operations are necessary to eradicate bone and soft-tissue infection and restore spinal stability. Continuous antibiotic therapy over a period of 2-3 weeks after normalization of infectious parameters is recommended. CONCLUSION: The spine as primary source of infection for secondary psoas abscess should always be included in differential diagnosis. Because the prognosis of psoas abscess can be improved by early diagnosis and prompt onset of therapy, it needs to be considered in patients with infection and back or hip pain or history of spinal surgery.
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ranking = 2.6
keywords = abscess
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