Cases reported "Bacterial Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/16. Human infection from an unidentified erythrocyte-associated bacterium.

    A 49-year-old splenectomized man had an infection from an unidentified, gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that adhered to the majority of his peripheral-blood erythrocytes. On transmission electron microscopy, the bacterium was seen to be extra-erythrocytic and was 0.2 micrometer wide by 1.0 to 1.7 micrometer long. It possessed a thick, granular cell wall, a trilamellar membrane external to the cell wall and prominent mesosomes. Attempts to cultivate the organism in vitro or to duplicate the patient's disease in splenectomized animals were unsuccessful. The patient's response suggested that the bacterium was susceptible to cell-wall-active antibiotics and to chloramphenicol but not to tetracycline. This bacterium may be the cause of other chronic, fever-producing, multisystem diseases of unknown origin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/16. The influence of moisture wound healing on the incidence of bacterial infection and histological changes in healthy human skin after treatment of interactive dressings.

    In this article the authors discuss the problem faced by physicians when trying to use moisture-retentive dressing in pressure sores (decubitus ulcers). First, they report the results of an in vitro study using a new model of experimental wound (radio-isotopic investigation) that assesses the release of Ringer's solution from interactive dressings continually during fourteen hours. Second, they perform an animal experiment that assesses the incidence of wound infection in defects treated conventionally or using interactive dressings. The defects treated with interactive pads had lower incidence of wound infection, and the process of wound healing was rapid. Finally, the authors discuss their experience in four paraplegic patients with decubitus ulcers where they used moisture-retentive dressing on ulcers and on the surrounding intact skin before surgical procedure to detect the possibility of maceration of healthy skin. Histological evaluation was performed in order to find microscopically changes after moisture healing. The changes of healthy skin were not significant after treatment of moisture-retentive dressings.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/16. Camel bite: an unusual type of head injury in an infant.

    Small children are predisposed for animal bite wounds in the craniofacial region, because the likelihood of sustaining trunk and extremity injuries increases with height. The clinical picture of animal bite wounds is highly variable. Depending on the dental anatomy of the biting animal, such wounds may range from sharp stitch wounds to extensive lacerations with or without tissue loss. The ears and nose are injured most often because of their exposed location. Nevertheless, depressed skull fractures with injury to the dura and to the brain parenchyma are extremely rare. This case presentation describes the rare case of a craniocerebral camel bite wound (Lackmann stage IV B) in a 3-year-old girl that required immediate neurosurgical management. The neurosurgical management, choice of antibiotic, postoperative treatment, and clinical course are discussed, and background information on camel bite injuries is given.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/16. Anti-infectious prophylaxis after splenectomy: current practice in an eastern region of switzerland.

    Overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) is a long-term risk in asplenic patients, which may be minimised by appropriate preventive measures. In this survey anti-infectious strategies after splenectomy were evaluated in an eastern part of switzerland. We found 91 individuals in the canton of Thurgau, who underwent splenectomy between 1998 and 2003. We assessed adherence to vaccination guidelines, the use of antibiotics and the awareness of the infectious risks by review of hospital charts and by structured interviews with patients and their general practitioners. The total vaccination rate was 64/91 (70%). 6 patients were vaccinated pre-operatively, 50 during the hospital stay and 8 after discharge by the general practitioner. 64 received vaccination against pneumococci, 6 against haemophilus influenzae and 3 against meningococci. Although 39 died during the study period, none died of overwhelming sepsis. None of the patients received a booster vaccination. Prophylactic long-term antibiotics were given to 2 children but to none of the 89 adults. Three adults had a supply of stand-by antibiotics at home. Less than half of the patients who were interviewed knew that asplenia puts them at greater risk for life-threatening infections and few practitioners were aware that travel and animal bites pose a special threat. We conclude that after splenectomy vaccination discipline and patient education should be substantially improved and suggest the publication of comprehensive guidelines.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/16. Transient hemophagocytosis with deficient cellular cytotoxicity, monoclonal immunoglobulin m gammopathy, increased T-cell numbers, and hypomorphic NEMO mutation.

    X-linked osteopetrosis, anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia, and immunodeficiency (XL-O-EDA-ID) is a disorder that is caused by hypomorphic mutations in the nuclear factor kappaB essential modulator (NEMO). These mutations lead to an impaired NF-kappaB activation. in vitro analyses and studies in animal models show that inhibition of NF-kappaB leads to a decrease of cytokine production and T-cell proliferation. patients classically display poor or delayed inflammatory response to infections. We describe a boy with XL-O-EDA-ID, 1167-1168insC NEMO mutation, and recurrent infections. In early infancy, he experienced hemophagocytosis with transient deficiency of natural killer activity. Increased immunoglobulin m levels in blood resulted from a monoclonal immunoglobulin m gammopathy. blood T-cell numbers were constantly increased, most probably resulting from a peripheral T-cell expansion. Our observations suggest that patients with hypomorphic NEMO mutations and repeated infections may experience inflammatory dysregulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/16. Chronic orbital inflammatory disease: parasitisation of orbital leucocytes by mollicute-like organisms.

    Chronic orbital inflammatory disease (COID) is usually considered non-infectious and idiopathic. Treatment is empirical, palliative, and may not prevent disease progression. COID occurs in isolation or in association with various systemic diseases. exophthalmos may be an important presenting sign. vasculitis, lymphoid infiltrates, and granulomas are common. Mollicute-like organisms (MLO) parasitising and destroying vitreous leucocytes are often found to cause human chronic uveitis when an appropriate search is made. Inoculation of these MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis and exophthalmic orbital inflammatory disease. Mollicutes are cell wall deficient bacteria. Extracellular mollicutes cause human and animal diseases characterised by lymphoid infiltrates, immunosuppression, and autoantibody production. Intracellular morphologically similar bacteria are non-cultivable pathogens termed MLO. Identification is based on direct detection in diseased cells by transmission electron microscopy. MLO are cytopathogenic and detection is aided by the alterations they produce. MLO replace the cytoplasm, destroy the organelles, and alter the nucleus. This results in cell proliferation, destruction, and dysfunction. MLO parasitise lymphocytes, monocytes, and polymorphonuclear leucocytes. This report describes orbital leucocytes parasitised by MLO in three patients with isolated COID. Rifampicin treatment of MLO disease is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/16. aeromonas hydrophila infection associated with the use of medicinal leeches.

    The use of medicinal leeches (Hiruda medicinalis) is becoming more common after plastic surgery to control venous congestion of skin grafts. We describe a patient with aeromonas hydrophila infection whose graft was treated with medicinal leeches. The infection required systemic antibiotic therapy. A. hydrophila is the predominant bacterial flora in the gut of the leech, where it plays an essential role for the animal in the digestion of blood. The potential for A. hydrophila wound infection, and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis of the leech or patient, should be considered when medicinal leeches are used.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/16. Cutaneous infection at dog bite wounds associated with fulminant DF-2 septicemia.

    Severe DF-2 sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy developed following dog bites in two patients who had undergone prior splenectomy. Eschariform lesions developed at the site of the animal bite in both patients. DF-2 is an unusual animal-borne slow-growing gram-negative rod that can cause fulminant sepsis in splenectomized patients. Splenectomized patients should be aware of the hazards from a dog bite. The presence of eschariform lesions in such patients should provide a clinical clue to the presence of DF-2 infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/16. Variant strain of propionibacterium acnes: a clue to the aetiology of Kawasaki disease.

    By means of anaerobic culture for 3-4 weeks a variant strain of propionibacterium acnes was isolated from one lymph-node biopsy specimen, and from blood samples of five of twenty-three patients with early Kawasaki disease, but from only one of fifteen blood samples from patients after 8 days' illness. No anaerobe was isolated from sixty age-matched controls with various disorders, but the same bacillus with the same serotype was isolated from house-dust mites from six patients' homes. patients had significantly higher serum agglutination titres to these strains than controls. The antigen moiety of P acnes was found in the patients' circulating immune complexes. Inoculation of animals caused various inflammatory lesions, particularly in the reticuloendothelial system, and coronary arteritis, myocarditis, and endocarditis in one of them, suggesting that the bacillus is pathogenic. The culture filtrate of this strain showed toxicity in tissue culture. This variant strain of P acnes may have a causative role in Kawasaki disease and house-dust mites a role as vectors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/16. Snake-to-human transmission of Aeromonas (Pl) shigelloides resulting in gastroenteritis.

    A healthy young man developed acute gastroenteritis after handling an infected bao constrictor. The animal died after contracting "mouth-rot disease", a progressive ulcerative stomatitis of snakes charactistically caused a Aeromonas species. Stool cultures from the patient yielded a heavy growth of Aeromonas (plesiomonas) shigelloides but no other enteric pathogens. Treatment wit sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim resulted in rapid relief of clinical symptoms. Aeromonas species are not considered part of the normal human fecal flora and gastroenteritis due to this organism is rare. Furthermore, this case appears to represent a new zoonosis: human Aeromonas (Plasiomonas) gastroenteritis derived from contact with an infected animal host.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Bacterial Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.