Cases reported "Bacterial Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. Value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in gynecologic infections.

    The ESR remains a valuable test in gynecology, specifically when obtained sequentially in cases of pelvic infection. It is nonspecific but has much merit in assessing prognosis and therapeutic measures. In conjunction with laparoscopy and diagnostic ultrasound it plays an important part in the evaluation of abdominal and pelvic infections.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. Anaerobic infections in surgery: clinical review.

    Anaerobic bacteria are being recognized with increasing frequency as important micro-organisms in surgical infections. clostridium, Bacteriodes, fusobacterium, and peptostreptococcus are the clinically prominent pathological anaerobes. All are commensals and, consequently, most anaerobic infections are endogenous in origin. In the colon, anaerobes are 1,000 times more prevalent than aerobes. This has important implications regarding the management of gastrointestinal tract operations and the treatment of infections originating from the bowel. Typical anaerobic infections include gas gangrene, brain abscess, oral infections, putrid lung abscesses, intra-abdominal abscesses, and wound infections following gynecologic and bowel surgery, perirectal abscesses, postabortal infections, and septic thrombophlebitis. Infections with anaerobic organisms must be suspected when there is feculent odor and/or gas production following gynecologic or bowel surgery, when there are organisms on gram staining but no growth on aerobic cultures, or when septicemia is associated with repeatedly negative blood cultures. debridement and drainage constitute the main stay of treatment. All anaerobes are sensitive to chloramphenicol and clindamycin and all but bacteroides fragils are sensitive to penicillin. Identification of anaerobes requires proper specimen sampling, immediate culturing on prereduced media, and careful gram staining of clinical material. The frequency of anaerobic organisms in surgical infections generally is not recognized by many surgeons; their importance needs to be stressed in the future.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Imperforate hymen complicated with pyocolpos and lobar nephronia.

    An imperforate hymen is not a rare condition in female newborns, but is often ignored in a genital examination by physicians. Lobar nephronia is a rare condition in pediatric patients that can be screened by ultrasound or computed tomography to distinguish it from a renal abscess. Treatment for lobar nephronia requires at least 14 days of antimicrobial therapy and a follow-up assessment by renal ultrasonography or dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. We report an unusual case of a 2-year-old girl with an imperforate hymen and pyocolpos. The pyocolpos compressed the left lower ureter to cause hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and nephronia. Partial hymenotomy was performed to drain the pus, and antibiotics were administered for a total of 3 weeks. There was a good outcome. This case demonstrates the need to perform a full physical examination, particularly a genital examination, in newborns. Further, if gynecologic pathology is suspected, then urologic screening studies are recommended to rule out potential associated anomalies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Right subhepatic abscess after cesarean section. A case report.

    A right subhepatic abscess complicated a case of cesarean delivery. The absence of an obvious pelvic infection or nongynecologic etiology of the abscess made the case particularly unusual. Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and percutaneous abscess drainage under the guidance of computed tomography resulted in a satisfactory resolution of the abscess.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Supracallosal interhemispheric arachnoid cyst: resolution after intracystic hemorrhage and infection.

    A case of a large, symptomatic, supracallosal interhemispheric arachnoid cyst is presented. Positive contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) cystography after stereotactic puncture and aspiration demonstrated lack of communication between the cyst and the subarachnoid space or ventricular system. A cystoperitoneal shunt was successful in relieving the patient's symptoms for 5 years. A delayed shunt infection after gynecologic surgery necessitated removal of the shunt, and was complicated by asymptomatic intracystic hemorrhage. Thereafter, serial CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed eventual disappearance of the cyst.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. Infectious morbidity in gynecologic cancer.

    A retrospective investigation of infectious morbidity in gynecologic oncology patients documented that 54 (11%) of 494 patients and 68 (6%) of 1204 patient admissions were complicated by a serious infection. The highest rate of infectious morbidity by admission was 21%, occurring in patients admitted for cancer of the vulva. The highest surgical infectious morbidity, 22%, occurred in patients admitted for cervical cancer. Important factors in determining infection risk include multiple host factors, radical surgical procedures, factors inherent in the tumor itself, and additional irradiation and chemotherapy. These serious polymicrobial infections dictate intelligent selection of antimicrobials and appropriate monitoring to anticipate complications inherent in antimicrobial therapy. beta-Lactamase induction, superinfection, nephrotoxicity, and necrotizing enterocolitis are documented problems in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. osteomyelitis pubis after radical gynecologic operations.

    The clinical and microbiologic features of five cases of osteomyelitis of the pubis after radical gynecologic and exenterative pelvic surgery are reported. pain and tenderness over the pubic symphysis and difficulty with ambulation were common features. The interval between surgery and diagnosis ranged from eight to 17 weeks (average, 13.6 weeks). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and alkaline phosphatase level were often abnormal, and x-rays, bone scan, and gallium scan were useful diagnostic tests. osteomyelitis of the pubis contributed to an increased hospital stay of 5.6 weeks (mean) for patients undergoing radical vulvectomy and ten to 24 weeks for patients undergoing total pelvic exenteration. Intravenous antibiotic therapy followed by long-term oral administration may provide effective therapy, but the presence of necrotic bone requires surgical excision of necrotic and infected tissue.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. Necrotizing fasciitis and progressive bacterial synergistic gangrene of the vulva.

    Necrotizing fasciitis and progressive bacterial synergistic gangrene are two infrequently reported diseases in the gynecologic literature. The author reports 2 cases highlighting the many similarities and some important differences between these clinical entities. diabetes mellitus and arteriosclerosis predispose women to both diseases. Aggressive antibacterial and surgical treatment is imperative.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. pelvic inflammatory disease. A review.

    pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a bacterial infection centered in the fallopian tubes, is increasingly encountered among adolescents seen by the pediatrician. This review describes two cases representative of gonococcal and nongonococcal PID and the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of this disorder are discussed. Emphasis is placed on management by the primary care pediatrician and indications for gynecologic consultation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Bacterial Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.