Cases reported "Bacterial Infections"

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1/50. Value of 111indium leukocyte scanning in febrile organ transplant patients.

    Immunosuppressed febrile organ transplant patients present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma since symptomatology is often altered by immunosuppression, which also masks the location of infection. Fifty 111indium leukocyte ( 111In WBC) scans were performed to determine their usefulness in the organ transplant patient. The results were compared with computerized tomography (CT) and gallium 67-citrate (Ga) scanning. Eleven patients received both 111In WBC and Ga scans; 22 received both 111In WBC and CT scans. Ten 111In WBC scans had subtraction of 99m Tc sulfur or albumin colloid for liver evaluation and four 111In WBC scans had subtraction of 99m Tc DMSA for kidney evaluation. The overall sensitivity and specificity for 111In WBC scans was 90% and 90%, respectively. lung uptake was sensitive (89%) and specific (97%) for pulmonary infections, including bacterial, fungal and cytomegalovirus pneumonias. Renal graft uptake occurred in 15 cases (41%), all except 2 being due to rejection, pyelonephritis, urinary tract infections, or cytomegalovirus infections. pyelonephritis and renal abscesses were diagnosed in 3 cases with 99m Tc DMSA subtraction. Perihepatic abscesses (2), and infected liver cysts (4) were diagnosed with 99m Tc sulfur or albumin colloid subtraction. There were five false-negative CT scans and three false-negative Ga scans. Therefore, when compared with 111In: sensitivity = 88% vs 64% (CT), specificity = 80% vs 86% (CT); and sensitivity = 111In 90% vs 67% (Ga), specificity = 100% for both 111In WBC and Ga scans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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ranking = 1
keywords = pyelonephritis
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2/50. stenotrophomonas (xanthomonas) maltophilia infection in necrotizing pancreatitis.

    CONCLUSION: Although the therapy of infected pancreatic collections or organized pancreatic necrosis remains surgical, we have demonstrated that infected organized pancreatic necrosis can be treated endoscopically. BACKGROUND: stenotrophomonas (xanthomonas) maltophilia has been increasingly recognized as a nosocomial pathogen associated with meningitis, pneumonia, conjunctivitis, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and urinary tract infections. This organism is consistently resistant to imipenem, a drug commonly employed in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis to prevent local and systemic infections. methods AND RESULTS: We report the first case of infected pancreatic necrosis by S. (X.) maltophilia. Our patient was treated successfully with endoscopic drainage of the pancreatic fluid collection and appropriate antibiogram-based antibiotic therapy. Endoscopic drainage has emerged as one of the treatment modalities for pancreatic fluid collections.
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ranking = 0.31603929414873
keywords = necrotizing
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3/50. Case report: inappropriate use of percutaneous drainage in the management of pancreatic necrosis.

    We describe three cases of severe necrotizing pancreatitis, with apache II scores of 11, 17 and 22, respectively. There was no significant pancreatic parenchymal perfusion in any of the three patients on contrast-enhanced computed tomography. All three patients were primarily treated with percutaneous drains and all three subsequently required open laparotomies. We do not recommend percutaneous drainage as a definitive therapy for severe necrotizing pancreatitis.
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ranking = 0.12641571765949
keywords = necrotizing
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4/50. Serious infections from bacillus sp.

    Serious infections caused by organisms of the genus bacillus developed in seven patients. Five drug abusers had either endocarditis or osteomyelitis, one leukemic patient had necrotizing fasciitis, and one patient had a ventriculoatrial shunt infection with recurrent bacteremia. All patients recovered. Experience with these cases reemphasizes the importance of not dismissing bacillus organisms as culture contaminants, especially when isolated from blood, body fluids, or closed-space infections.
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ranking = 0.063207858829746
keywords = necrotizing
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5/50. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis due to odontogenic infections.

    OBJECTIVE: Acute purulent mediastinitis caused by oropharyngeal infection is termed descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Such infections usually have a fulminate course, leading to sepsis and frequently to death. The purpose of this study is to show the importance of early diagnosis, aggressive surgical intervention, and optimal antibiotics chemotherapy in controlling this fatal infectious disease. STUDY DESIGN: Two patients with descending necrotizing mediastinitis due to odontogenic infection who were treated at our institution are described. RESULTS: Both patients survived. CONCLUSIONS: From the patients, 23 different aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were isolated. All of the isolates were susceptible to carbapenem. Early evaluation by means of cervicothoracic computed tomography scanning was extremely useful for diagnosis and surgical planning. knowledge of anatomic pathways from the mouth to the mediastinum is essential. We believe that tracheostomy is not always necessary. In both of the cases presented, mediastinal drainage was completed through use of a transcervical approach. However, a more aggressive drainage including tracheostomy might be necessary when the infection extends below the carina.
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ranking = 0.37924715297848
keywords = necrotizing
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6/50. Acute pyelonephritis: a cause of acute renal failure?

    Two patients with acute renal failure due to acute pyelonephritis are described. Examination of the renal biopsy showed normal glomeruli, severe interstitial neutrophilic infiltration and edema with no signs of acute tubular necrosis. Until now, only twelve biopsy-proven proven cases have been reported. A review of the literature on acute renal failure due to acute pyelonephritis is presented.
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ranking = 6
keywords = pyelonephritis
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7/50. Necrotizing soft tissue infection from decubitus ulcer after spinal cord injury.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case of necrotizing soft tissue infection in a patient with spinal cord injury with extension of infection into the spinal canal and spinal cord is presented. OBJECTIVE: To review the history, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and morbidity and mortality regarding necrotizing soft tissue infection as they relate to spinal cord injury. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Necrotizing soft tissue infection related to decubitus ulcers is rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this disease related to a sacral decubitus ulcer with extension of the necrotizing infection into the spinal canal. methods: The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features associated with necrotizing soft tissue infection are presented. The patient presented with a late-stage necrotizing soft tissue infection requiring extensive de-bridement of necrotic tissue, which the patient underwent on admission. RESULTS: The patent died of refractory septic shock and multiple-organ failure after surgery. CONCLUSION: Necrotizing soft tissue infections from decubitus ulcers are rare and unpredictable, and ultimately have a progressively aggressive course. The case reported herein is the first report of necrotizing soft tissue infection from a decubitus ulcer in a patient with spinal cord injury with extension into the spinal canal and spinal cord.
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ranking = 0.37924715297848
keywords = necrotizing
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8/50. pyelonephritis and acute renal failure.

    Bacterial invasion of the renal parenchyma, pyelonephritis, is rarely considered as a primary cause of acute renal failure, particularly in adults. We report two cases of acute renal failure occurring in absence of hypotension, urinary tract obstruction, or nephrotoxic medications that are likely the direct consequence of pyelonephritis. The first case involved a 48-year-old hiv-positive woman who presented with 3 days of nonspecific symptoms and was noted to have acute renal failure. Due to unremitting renal dysfunction, a renal biopsy was performed confirming the diagnosis of bacterial pyelonephritis. The second case, a 33-year-old man with hiv disease, presented with fever and was found to have pyelonephritis by urine culture and ultrasonography. These cases represented initial diagnostic dilemmas for the admitting physicians and demonstrate the varied clinical presentations of acute renal failure as a direct consequence of bacterial infiltration of the renal parenchyma.
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ranking = 4
keywords = pyelonephritis
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9/50. Infection in the diabetic foot.

    A 56-year-old woman presented with a chronic infection of her right first toe. The woman had a 15-year history of diabetes mellitus and had been insulin dependent for the past five years. Her toe had been injured one month earlier when hit by a frozen chicken that fell out of the freezer. The accident caused a bruise and a small cut. Serous to purulent drainage then developed. When she presented, the toe was reddened and draining. physical examination showed a nonobese woman with no fever or other evidence of systemic infection. The wound showed no evidence of necrotizing fasciitis. Peripheral pulses were 2 and capillary refill was slow. sensation in both feet was decreased. The transcutaneous oxygen tension in the feet was reduced at 20 mm Hg. Relevant laboratory findings included a serum glucose of 250 and creatinine of 1.5. x-rays of the foot were compatible with diffuse osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx of the great toe. technetium and indium scans were positive, with increased uptake localized to the area of x-ray changes (Figure 1). The patient was admitted to the hospital.
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ranking = 0.063207858829746
keywords = necrotizing
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10/50. Uncommon complications of sacrospinous fixation for treatment of vaginal vault prolapse.

    OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken to evaluate uncommon complications following transvaginal sacrospinous colpopexy for treatment of vaginal vault prolapse. case reports: A series of three patients who developed uncommon complications following sacrospinous fixation are reported. A 64-year-old patient undergoing bilateral sacrospinous colpopexy for the treatment of an ICS stage III vaginal vault prolapse developed a perineal necrotizing infection. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with total vaginal vault prolapse and anterior vaginal wall defect (ICS stage II), underwent a right transvaginal sacrospinous colpopexy and anterior repair, presenting postoperatively with a perineal hernia. The third case consisted of a 71-year-old woman who underwent a right sacrospinous colpopexy with paravaginal repair, rectocele repair, and perineorrhaphy for treatment of an ICS stage III post-hysterectomy vaginal vault prolapse, stage II cystocele secondary to a bilateral paravaginal defect, and a stage II rectocele. Six months later the patient developed a left lateral enterocele, which was successfully repaired with a left sacrospinous ligament fixation. DISCUSSION: Etiological factors and treatment considerations for these uncommon complications of sacrospinous colpopexy are discussed in detail, and prophylactic measures, when applicable, are emphasized.
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ranking = 0.063207858829746
keywords = necrotizing
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