Cases reported "Bacteroidaceae Infections"

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1/12. porphyromonas gingivalis bacteremia and subhepatic abscess after renal transplantation: a case report.

    A uremic patient developed subhepatic abscess, porphyromonas gingivalis bacteremia and cytomegalovirus viremia after a renal transplantation in mainland china. P. gingivalis infection has been reported to cause gingivitis and periodontitis. bacteremia due to P. gingivalis, however, has not been reported in the literature. We report herein a case of subhepatic abscess and bacteremia due to P. gingivalis in a renal transplant recepient who was treated successfully with the well functioning renal graft.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gingival
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2/12. Long-term follow-up of periodontitis in a patient with chediak-higashi syndrome. A case report.

    chediak-higashi syndrome (CHS) is an extremely rare hereditary disease characterized by leukocyte dysfunction. We report on a 21-year-old woman who presented at the age 9 years with CHS and serious periodontal tissue destruction around erupted teeth. The patient had received systemic, radiographic, immunological, microbial, and clinical periodontal examinations since childhood. The chemotactic activity of neutrophils in the Boyden chamber assay was 22% of the control, and leukocyte bactericidal activity was one-third of the control. actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, porphyromonas gingivalis, and prevotella intermedia were isolated from periodontal pockets. Periodontal treatment including oral hygiene was provided, followed by professional tooth cleaning from the age of 12 to 21 years. However, the mobility of teeth and the inflammation of periodontal tissue progressed. This CHS patient presented with periodontal disease of extremely early onset, which was resistant to periodontal treatment.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = gingival
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3/12. Three case reports of aggressive periodontitis associated with porphyromonas gingivalis in younger patients.

    The terms 'early onset periodontitis' (EOP) and 'juvenile periodontitis' (JP) were replaced by that of 'aggressive periodontitis' in a recent international workshop for the classification of periodontal diseases and conditions. The chief etiologic agent for aggressive periodontitis is considered to be actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis. porphyromonas gingivalis is also mentioned as the etiologic agent of the aggressive periodontitis, although to date its role remains questionable. This communication describes three cases of aggressive periodontitis found to be associated with P. gingivalis but not A. actinomycetemcomitans by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our findings clarify the role of P. gingivalis as an etiologic agent in this type of periodontitis and confirm its inclusion in the current definition of aggressive periodontitis.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = gingival
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4/12. Identification of Prevotella in pedal osteomyelitis of a diabetic patient.

    osteomyelitis in a diabetic patient with a nonhealing foot ulcer, multiple medical conditions, and recurrent hospitalization for antibiotic therapy was found to be associated with gram-negative bacteria Prevotella melanginoganica and Prevotella melaninoganica hemagglutinating variant. Those organisms were identified due to the morphologically distinct features in electron microscopy and sequencing of the genes after polymerase chain reaction amplification from the pathological material. The bacteria invaded the bone and resided in osteocyte, osteoblast, and endothelial cells. The bacteria are usually associated with periodontal plaques, causing inflammation and destruction of gingival tissue and resorption of the alveolar bone. This is the first ultrastructural and molecular study of a diabetic bone lesion with anaerobic bacterial infection.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = gingival
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5/12. brain abscess in which porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in cerebrospinal fluid.

    In this paper, we report one case of severe brain abscess in which Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in the spinal fluid.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = gingival
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6/12. Infection of a total hip arthroplasty with Prevotella loeschii.

    Infection is a serious complication of total hip replacement. It has been proposed that 6% of all infections after total hip arthroplasty may be of dental origin through hematogenous spread. However, no conclusive evidence that the mouth is a definitive source for infection of a total hip replacement has been reported. In the current case, Prevotella loeschii, a pigmented bacteroides species was identified in a total hip replacement. Prevotella loeschii is an organism which exclusively inhabits the dental region. Hematogenous spread of Prevotella loeschii may occur after penetration of the mucosal barrier in cases of endodontic or periodontic lesions, pericoronitis, or complications of tooth extraction. The involvement of Prevotella loescheii in an infection in a patient who had a total hip arthroplasty is strong evidence for the mechanism of a hematogenous infection from a dental source.
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ranking = 0.016207765116264
keywords = dental
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7/12. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Prevotella (bacteroides) melaninogenicus.

    A 35-year-old, previously healthy female presented with severe low back pain, fever, and a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate 1 week after a routine dental cleaning. technetium-labeled leukocyte scanning and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the spine were negative for osteomyelitis. The patient underwent biopsy, cultures from which grew Prevotella (bacteroides) melaninogenicus. Appropriate antibiotic therapy resulted in resolution of symptoms. P. melaninogenicus is a gram-negative anaerobic bacillus that is part of the indigenous oral flora. It may cause dental, sinus, skin, and soft tissue infections. Infection of bone is rare. Only three cases of vertebral osteomyelitis due to P. melaninogenicus have been reported in the literature. The early diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis requires a high index of clinical suspicion and cannot be excluded by negative imaging tests alone. The recovery of this unusual organism highlights the importance of requesting anaerobic cultures of biopsy specimens.
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ranking = 0.010805176744176
keywords = dental
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8/12. Periodontal treatment in severe aplastic anemia.

    BACKGROUND: Aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare hematologic disease characterized by hypo-cellular bone marrow. The clinical features include fatigue, increased bruising, and gingival bleeding caused by anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. A patient with AA is at high risk for infection because of leukopenia. The risk of systemic infection is especially high in AA patients with severe local infections, including periodontitis. Accordingly, periodontal treatment should include antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of systemic infection. However, treatment of periodontitis in the AA patient is significantly complicated by the bleeding disorder. We present a case report of the successful periodontal treatment of an AA patient with spontaneous gingival bleeding. methods: The patient was closely monitored for platelet and neutrophil counts before every treatment. The patient's platelet count was always under 10,000/microl. Therefore, it was necessary to increase platelet counts to over 25,000/microl by transfusion, after which subgingival scaling with anesthesia was performed. When the neutrophil count was less than 2,000/microl, local minocycline chemotherapy was applied to the pockets. Periodontal infection was monitored by detection of bacterial dna and measurement of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G titer against periodontal bacteria. RESULTS: Following the physical and chemical treatment, the gingival appearance improved dramatically and the spontaneous gingival bleeding disappeared. Moreover, the IgG titer against periodontal bacteria decreased to normal range and specific periodontal pathogens were no longer detectable in the tested pockets. CONCLUSION: We believe that the treatment strategy in the present report provides new sight into treatment planning for severely medically compromised patients.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = gingival
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9/12. Resolution of furcation bone loss after non-surgical root canal treatment: application of a peptidase-detection kit for treatment of type I endoperiodontal lesion.

    Here, we report the management of a type I endoperiodontal lesion with furcation bone loss. A 59-year-old female attended our hospital with the chief complaint of mobility of tooth 46 and recurrent gingival swelling around the tooth. She previously received dental treatment from two dentists, but her condition did not improve. The tooth manifested the symptoms of typical periodontitis, such as gingival swelling, tooth mobility, pus discharge from the periodontal pocket and furcation bone loss. The tooth had no caries and the pulp reacted to an electric pulp test. Careful examination of the gingiva revealed traces of dental fistula. X-ray examination via a gutta percha inserted into the fistula revealed that furcation bone loss was associated with the periapical lesion. We diagnosed a type I endoperiodontal lesion, and applied Periocheck, a detection kit for peptidase-producing bacteria, to check for decreases in bacteria in the furcation and root canals. Soon after non-surgical root canal treatment, the condition of tooth 46 improved without periodontal treatment. After confirming a negative score with Periocheck, the root canal was filled. After 3 months, the furcation bone loss was on the way to recovery. These results indicate that proper diagnosis and confirmation of a decrease in root canal bacteria are important for treating endoperiodontal lesions.
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ranking = 0.26080517674418
keywords = gingival, dental
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10/12. cytomegalovirus-associated periodontitis and guillain-barre syndrome.

    BACKGROUND: guillain-barre syndrome (GBS), an autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system, is characterized by rapidly ascending neural paralysis, hyporeflexia, and areflexia. The polyneuropathy of the GBS affects one to four humans per 100,000 of the population annually throughout the world (adults and children). The pathogenesis of GBS remains unclear. However, there are increasing indications that the disease is triggered by a preceding well-established febrile infection by cytomegalovirus (CMV). The present report describes active CMV within the periodontium of a 37-year-old patient affected by GBS. methods: Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) was performed to detect CMV, Epstein-Barr virus-1 (EBV-1), herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) virus, and enteroviruses (polio-, coxsackie-, echo-, and enteroviruses 68 and 71) from periodontal sites demonstrating advanced attachment loss. Healthy sites and sites with inflamed gingival tissue were not included in the study. Anaerobic bacterial culture determined the occurrence of potential major periodontal pathogens. RESULTS: Real-time RT-PCR and microbiologic analysis revealed the presence of a dual infection of CMV and specific bacterial plaque. CMV, porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, and campylobacter species were associated with periodontitis active sites, loss of attachment, and gingival bleeding. Furthermore, periodontal sites infected by active CMV had no visible radiographic crestal lamina dura. CONCLUSIONS: The periodontium may serve as a reservoir for CMV and a source of viral replication. However, further research is needed to test whether viral replication in the periodontium precedes the GBS symptoms.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = gingival
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