Cases reported "Bartonella Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. Disseminated Bartonella infection following liver transplantation.

    bartonella henselae has not only been identified as the causative agent of cat scratch disease, but it is also associated with other significant infectious syndromes in the immunocompromised population. We describe two cases of B. henselae associated diseases in liver transplant recipients who both had contact with cats. The first recipient developed localized skin manifestation of bacillary angiomatosis in association with granulomatous hepatitis. He tested positive for immunoglobulin g (IgG) antibodies against B. henselae. The second patient developed axillary lymphadenopathy, with biopsy showing necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and polymerase chain reaction studies were positive for B. henselae dna. Her serology for bartonellosis showed a fourfold rise in antibody titers during her hospitalization. Both patients responded to treatment with azithromycin in combination with doxycycline. These were the only cases within a series of 467 consecutive liver transplants performed in 402 patients performed during a 4-year period. Although bartonellosis is a rare infection in liver transplantation recipients, it should always be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever, central nervous system (CNS) symptoms, skin lesions, lymphadenopathy, and hepatitis especially if prior contact with cats is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. Clinical, histologic, microbiologic, and biochemical characterization of the causative agent of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis: a rickettsial illness with features of bartonellosis.

    It has been suggested that bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis (BEA) is a manifestation of cat scratch disease (CSD). Because of clinical similarity between this condition and the verruga peruana phase of bartonellosis, we sought to further characterize this disease as well as its causative agent and to compare it to bartonellosis. We isolated a small flagellated pleomorphic bacillus from skin lesions of two patients with BEA. Organisms were stained successfully with Warthin-Starry silver stains, but immunohistochemistry failed to demonstrate binding with a polyclonal antibody directed against the cat scratch bacillus. Whole cell fatty-acid gas chromatography performed on both BEA organisms and bartonella bacilliformis demonstrated marked similarity between the two. Electron microscopy of BEA organisms in tissue and in suspension revealed features characteristic of a gram negative bacillus. Based on these findings, we propose that this unusual rickettsial infectious disease with vascular proliferation may represent an unusual variant of infection with a bartonella-like organism rather than a manifestation of cat scratch disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis and concurrent Kaposi's sarcoma in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed simultaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis. The distinguishing clinical and histologic features of these two vascular proliferations associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease are described. The lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis contained bacteria, while the lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma did not. With erythromycin therapy, the lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis cleared, while those of Kaposi's persisted. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis, a treatable but potentially fatal opportunistic infection of human immunodeficiency virus disease, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular lesions in immunosuppressed patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Bacillary angiomatosis: a treatable cause of acute psychiatric symptoms in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    BACKGROUND: Bacillary angiomatosis is a systemic infection that has been most commonly reported in the setting of immunosuppression, especially human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) disease. METHOD: We report two patients who had bacillary angiomatosis who presented with psychiatric symptoms. RESULTS: The first patient presented with marked exacerbation of previous depressive disease. The second patient presented with new psychotic symptoms. In both cases psychiatric symptoms did not resolve until antibiotic treatment was given. CONCLUSION: Our report expands the clinical spectrum of bacillary angiomatosis and identifies a new cause of treatable psychiatric disease in hiv-infected persons.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Ophthalmic manifestations of Rochalimaea species.

    Rochalimaea henselae and R. quintana belong to the order Rickettsiales and are thought to be responsible for trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, and cat scratch disease. We recently examined four patients with intraocular inflammation of unknown origin. Each patient had either unilateral or bilateral moderate loss of visual acuity ranging from 20/25 to counting fingers. Bilateral intraocular inflammation manifested by anterior and posterior segment cells, retinal lesions, macular exudate, and optic nerve head swelling was present to varying degrees. The R. henselae to R. quintana antibody titers were greater than or equal to 1:256 in each case. Marked improvement in vision occurred after treatment with either oral ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and prednisone or doxycycline hyclate. Rochalimaea species should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraocular inflammation and inflammatory optic neuropathy. Appropriate treatment may result in marked improvement in visual acuity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. Granulomatous hepatitis and necrotizing splenitis due to bartonella henselae in a patient with cancer: case report and review of hepatosplenic manifestations of bartonella infection.

    Bacillary angiomatosis and the related disorders of bacillary peliosis hepatis and bacillary splenitis are manifestations of infection with bartonella henselae and bartonella quintana in immunocompromised persons. B. henselae infection, but not B. quintana infection, is linked to contact with cats and is presumed to cause visceral cat-scratch disease. We reports a case of visceral infection by B. henselae in an adult patient with cancer who was receiving chemotherapy and had had no contact with a cat or dog. The patient--whose illness was eventually diagnosed on the basis of findings of histologic, polymerase chain reaction, and serological studies--was treated with doxycycline and rifampin, and the infection resolved. In addition, 41 cases of documented or suspected bartonella infection of the liver, spleen, or both in immunocompetent or immunocompromised hosts are reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. bartonella infections and hiv disease.

    Successful assessment and treatment of Bartonella in hiv-seropositive people depends on nursing's fundamental role in the management of these bacterial infections. Bartonella species are responsible for a variety of infections, including cat scratch disease and bacillary angiomatosis, which can be debilitating to people living with AIDS. This paper provides an overview of the clinical presentation and nursing management of Bartonella infection in PLWAs. The author discusses common diagnostic procedures, treatment strategies, and the nurse's role in caring for patients with a Bartonella infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. Sternal abscess due to Bartonella (Rochalimaea) henselae in a renal transplant patient.

    bartonella henselae, previously called Rochalimaea henselae, is the causative agent of cat scratch disease (CSD) in immunocompetent subjects and bacillary angiomatosis in immunocompromised ones. Bone lesions are common in bacillary angiomatosis, but not in CSD. We present the case of a patient with a renal transplant treated by immunosuppressive therapy who developed a sternal abscess with a histological pattern of CSD. The CT pattern was that of a lytic bone lesion with adjacent fluid collection. The diagnosis was made on the basis of a polymerase chain reaction amplification performed on bone material. bartonella henselae is a newly described bacteria that causes CSD in a normal host and bacillary angiomatosis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of an osteolytic lesions of the sternum with adjacent fluid collection related to CSD, which occurred in a patient with a renal transplant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Bacillary angiomatosis and other Bartonella species infections.

    Infections with organisms of the genus Bartonella, for many years important only in South and central america, have assumed significance in developing countries, especially in conjunction with the advent of the pandemic of the human immunodeficiency virus infection. New molecular and culture techniques have determined that these organisms cause new diseases such as bacillary angiomatosis as well as diseases the etiology of which have been unknown such as cat scratch disease. In this article, the microbiology, pathogenesis, histopathology and clinical manifestations of diseases caused by these organisms are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Bartonella Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.