Cases reported "Bites, Human"

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1/79. Reconstruction of a large defect of the ear using a composite graft following a human bite injury.

    Human bites to the ear are not an uncommon injury as a consequence of brawls or even contact sports like rugby. Untreated, the cosmetic outcome of such injury is unsightly. This case history documents how a patient, who had two-thirds of his external ear bitten off, was treated successfully by replacing the part as a composite graft. The segment replanted was minimally trimmed but inset to allow maximal soft tissue apposition at the skin edges. An episode of postoperative venous congestion was treated with leeches. Patience was exercised rather than early debridement of any struggling tissue. All these factors helped the final result, which was 100% take of the replanted segment. Six months from the time of injury, the grafted segment has maintained its shape without cartilage resorption.
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2/79. A human bite.

    We report the transmission of group A streptococci by a human bite leading to severe necrotising fasciitis. Rapid surgical and antibiotic treatment led to healing without fractional loss of the patient's infected leg.
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3/79. Traumatic macroglossia: a life-threatening complication.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of muscle relaxants and a bite raiser to avoid continued tongue trauma. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: A tertiary general intensive care unit (ICU). INTERVENTIONS: muscle relaxation and bite raiser. MAIN RESULTS: muscle relaxation and a bite raiser were used in a 17-yr-old male with traumatic macroglossia, which allowed for rapid resolution of edema and prevented additional trauma to the tongue. CONCLUSION: Early use of a bite raiser together with muscle relaxants allows for more rapid solution of edema and prevention of additional trauma to the tongue in patients with traumatic macroglossia.
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4/79. Analysis of salivary dna evidence from a bite mark on a body submerged in water.

    A female body was recovered after approximately 5.5 h in a river with slow-moving current. On the victim's right breast, a patterned injury was discovered and determined to be from human adult teeth. Evidence was collected according to established techniques including recovery of saliva from the bite mark area despite the body being found submerged in water. dna analysis by PCR using polymorphic STR markers revealed a dna profile of mixed origin. In addition to the victim's dna profile, a genotype contribution from the perpetrator was identified as a minor component. The dna typing results from the bite mark correlated with the dna typing results obtained from other biological trace evidence identified from the victim's genital samples. The bite mark and the dna evidence were used to screen suspects and played an important role in obtaining resolution of this case. Consequently, it is advisable that investigators routinely swab for salivary dna in bite mark cases, even when the amount is thought to be minimal.
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5/79. Human bites and the risk of human immunodeficiency virus transmission.

    The risk of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmission following a bite injury is important to many groups of people. The first are those who are likely to be bitten as an occupational risk, such as police officers and institutional staff. Another group are represented by the victims and perpetrators of crimes involving biting, both in attack and defense situations. The possibility of these bites transmitting a potentially fatal disease is of interest to the physicians who treat such patients and the legal system which may have to deal with the repercussions of such a transmission. Bite injuries represent 1% of all emergency department admissions in the united states, and human bites are the third most common following those of dogs and cats. The worldwide epidemic of hiv and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) continues, with >5 million new cases last year and affecting 1 in 100 sexually active adults. A review of the literature concerning human bites, hiv and AIDS, hiv in saliva, and case examples was performed to examine the current opinion regarding the transmission of hiv via this route. A bite from an hiv-seropositive individual that breaks the skin or is associated with a previous injury carries a risk of infection for the bitten individual.
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6/79. Genital ulcer caused by human bite to the penis.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Human bite injuries, while less frequent than cat or dog bites, usually stem from aggressive behavior, sports, or sexual activity. It has been thought that human bites have a higher rate of infection than animal bites, but this view is likely skewed because of the frequency of closed fist injuries presenting to emergency rooms. Human bites to the genitalia also occur, but are not often reported because of embarrassment. GOAL OF THE STUDY: We report a genital ulceration after a human bite to the penis and review appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers. STUDY DESIGN: This article reports the development of a severe genital ulcer associated with a human bite to the penis secondarily infected, as verified by culture, with an oral flora organism eikenella corrodens. RESULTS: The genital ulceration healed after appropriate antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of human bites focuses on obtaining an accurate history and performing a salient physical examination, as well as early irrigation and debridement. Transmission of communicable disease should be considered as a possible consequence. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment and primary closure of wounds continue to be areas of controversy.
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7/79. amputation of the penis by human bite: a case report.

    A 3-year-old boy had his penis amputated by being bitten by a neglected psychiatric individual and presented late with urethral stricture. Initially, he had suprapubic diversion of urine and later meatoplasty. A plea is made for vigilance with children and appropriate care of individuals with psychiatric problems.
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8/79. Analysis of tooth marks in a homicide case. Observations by means of visual description, stereo-photography, scanning electron microscopy and stereometric graphic plotting.

    In 1957 a woman was murdered in Oslo. Her left breast exhibited tooth marks. A man was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment partly because of the dental evidence. He never admitted guilt and filed a petition for retrial. The present author was appointed as new dental expert. The material consisted of the fixed breast, models of the bite mark and models of the teeth of the convict, and several photographs. By means of visual examination, a magnifying glass, a lens stereoscope and a stereomicroscope characteristic details were noted. Stereoscopic picture pairs were taken, the material was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and a stereometricgraphic plotting method permitting the outline of the tooth mark or the biting edge of a tooth to be registered in great detail in all three dimensions in the form of a contour map. This method has not previously been applied in the analysis of tooth marks in human skin. These examinations revealed no discrepancies but showed many corresponding characteristic features between the tooth marks and the teeth of the convict, resulting in the conclusion that it is highly probable that the tooth marks in the breast were made by the teeth of the convict.
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9/79. Biting off more than you can chew: a forensic case report.

    A case is reported where a forefinger is 'amputated' by a human bite. This type of extreme biting injury is uncommon and probably represents tearing by the premolar teeth rather than a clean bite by incisor teeth.
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10/79. Salvage of ear replantation using the temporoparietal fascia flap.

    The authors report a case involving a 46-year-old man who sustained a traumatic amputation of approximately 60% of his ear from a human bite. The ear was replanted microsurgically without the benefit of venous anastomosis. blood transfusion was not required despite the use of leech therapy and systemic anticoagulation. The replantation appeared to be a success at the time of his discharge from the hospital, but during the late postoperative period the replanted ear became progressively necrotic. The failing ear replantation was rescued successfully with the use of temporoparietal fascia flap reconstruction.
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