Cases reported "Bites and Stings"

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11/92. Cat cuddler's cough.

    pasteurella multocida typically causes cutaneous infections in humans following animal bites or scratches. Primary pulmonary disease, however, can occur in humans after inhalation of airborne particles or by aspiration of colonized or infected nasopharyngeal secretions containing this organism. Symptoms of P. multocida pulmonary infection in humans are variable, ranging from cough with or without hemoptysis to severe prostration. P. multocida infection of the lower respiratory tree has a predilection for elderly patients with underlying lung pathology, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis. This report reminds the clinician that P. multocida can cause pulmonary infection in patients without underlying lung disease, and stresses the importance of careful history when presented with an indolent infection.
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keywords = animal
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12/92. Basic instinct in a feline.

    Reported cases in europe of large felines attacking humans are rare. Recently, in france, a man was attacked in an animal park by a tigress he had raised. He received fatal cervical wounds. This case of death by bites and lacerations, together with others in the recent international literature, underline the hereditary ferocity of such felines and the way in which they prefer to inflict lesions to the neck.
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keywords = animal
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13/92. Aquatic antagonists: lionfish stings.

    Although lionfish can be found in all the oceans, the highest incidences of human stings appear to be in the tropics, especially in the Indo-Pacific area and mediterranean sea. The recent interest in tropical fish aquaria has expanded the geographic range of the stings of these animals.
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keywords = animal
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14/92. dna profiling of trace evidence--mitigating evidence in a dog biting case.

    A young girl was the victim of a severe dog attack. An animal, suspected of having caused the attack, was later impounded for investigation. Microclots of blood, recovered from the dog's fur, were analyzed by STR dna. Results showed that this blood was not related to the biting. Other forensic evidence--hairs, fibers, and odontology--failed to connect a particular animal to the attack. The implications of these findings for the dog and its owners are discussed as well as other forensic methods for resolving such cases.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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15/92. Envenomation by a benthic hydrozoa (cnidaria): the case of Nemalecium lighti (Haleciidae).

    A case of envenomation caused by the Nemalecium lighti is described. The hydrozoan species lives in many kinds of substrates, being quite common in tropical shallow water. The patient, a marine biologist, had contact with the animal in two different opportunities while snorkeling. Both contacts produced erythematous and highly pruriginous papules in exposed areas of the body. The signs and symptoms persisted for a week and healed without sequellae.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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16/92. Cryptogenic rabies, bats, and the question of aerosol transmission.

    Human rabies is rare in the united states; however, an estimated 40,000 patients receive rabies postexposure prophylaxis each year. Misconceptions about the transmission of rabies are plentiful, particularly regarding bats. Most cases of human rabies caused by bat variants have no definitive history of animal bite. Three hypotheses are proposed and reviewed for the transmission of rabies from bats to human beings. They include nonbite transmission (including aerosol transmission), the alternate host hypothesis (an intermediate animal host that acquires rabies from a bat and then transmits rabies to human beings), and minimized or unrecognized bat bites. Nonbite transmission of rabies is very rare, and aerosol transmission has never been well documented in the natural environment. The known pathogenesis of rabies and available data suggest that all or nearly all cases of human rabies attributable to bats were transmitted by bat bites that were minimized or unrecognized by the patients.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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17/92. Pasteurella canis osteomyelitis and cutaneous abscess after a domestic dog bite.

    The genus Pasteurella is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including domestic cats and dogs. In humans, Pasteurella may cause complications ranging from cellulitis to septicemia but rarely causes osteomyelitis or septic arthritis after bites and/or scratches by cats and dogs. Although pasteurella multocida is a common cause of infection, other Pasteurella species have also been cultured from wounds in humans. We describe here, a case of a cutaneous abscess and acute osteomyelitis associated with P canis after a domestic dog bite. To our knowledge, no previous case of P canis has been reported as the cause of acute osteomyelitis in humans.
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keywords = animal
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18/92. Aquatic antagonists: Catalaphyllia jardinei sting.

    Catalaphyllia jardinei is a blue-green soft coral whose red-violet tipped tentacles have made it a very colorful, popular animal prized by amateur aquarists (Figure 1). Its normal habitat is the Indo-Pacific area from seychelles through vanuatu and from Northern australia to Southern japan. It is regarded as mildly venomous. However, to our knowledge, no reports exist on its sting's effects on man.
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keywords = animal
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19/92. Diagnostic problems associated with cadaveric trauma from animal activity.

    Analysis of a series of deaths between 1986 and 2001 resulting from natural disease, accidents, suicides, and homicide, where postmortem animal activity had traumatized bodies, was undertaken at the Forensic science Center in Adelaide to demonstrate the range of lesions that may occur and problems in interpretation that result. Tissue damage had been caused by a variety of animals, including fly larvae, ants, birds, dogs, rodents, sea lice, and sharks. Postmortem animal activity had disguised injuries, modified wounds, and created the appearances of inflicted injury. Problems with identification occurred after postmortem facial trauma, and loss of organ parenchyma had interfered with, or precluded, the precise determination of the manner of death in some cases. Specific kinds of tissue and organ damage may occur after death, necessitating careful assessment of lesions in a search for characteristic features of animal activity. The pattern of lesions may enable identification of the particular species of animal involved.
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ranking = 9
keywords = animal
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20/92. Human rabies: a reemerging disease in costa rica?

    Two human rabies cases caused by a bat-associated virus variant were identified in September 2001 in costa rica, after a 31-year absence of the disease in humans. Both patients lived in a rural area where cattle had a high risk for bat bites, but neither person had a definitive history of being bitten by a rabid animal. Characterization of the rabies viruses from the patients showed that the reservoir was the hematophagous Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus, and that a sick cat was the vector.
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