Cases reported "Bites and Stings"

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21/92. Cat bite in an old patient: is it a simple injury?

    An 84-year-old woman bitten by her domestic cat developed a severe wound infection caused by pasteurella multocida. Although she was treated with antibiotics according to the bacterial sensitivity, the infection progressed to sepsis and became complicated by transient renal failure caused by interstitial nephritis. The need in the emergency department for a thorough examination of patients with domestic animal-inflicted injuries, the indication for surgical debridement, and the isolation of the offender by early obtained cultures are considered. The administration of the properly chosen antibiotics and prophylactic vaccination against rabies and tetanus are discussed.
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keywords = animal
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22/92. Puppy pregnancy in humans: a culture-bound disorder in rural West Bengal, india.

    BACKGROUND: Delusion of pregnancy in males, though uncommon, has been reported in the literature. Delusion of animal pregnancy in humans is unreported until now, and we are reporting here cases of puppy pregnancy in human beings from a part of rural West Bengal, india. MATERIAL: Studies of six male cases and one female case of delusion of puppy pregnancy after an alleged touch or bite of a dog are presented. DISCUSSION: Detailed phenomenological analysis revealed that there exists a strong cultural belief that dog bite may evolve into a puppy pregnancy even in the human male. Psychiatric status showed that there was a clear association of obsessive-compulsive disorder in two cases, anxiety-phobic locus in one and three showed no other mental symptom except this solitary false belief and preoccupation about the puppy pregnancy. All the cases were from rural areas and their communities endorse this pathogenic event of puppy pregnancy in humans. One case (11-year-old child) exemplified how the social imposition of this cultural belief made him a case that allegedly vomited out an embryo of a dog foetus. CONCLUSION: Although the belief in puppy pregnancy is culturally shared, the cases presented a mix of somatic and psychological complaints and their help-seeking behaviour was marked. These features prompted us to identify this phenomena as a culture-bound disorder which needs proper cultural understanding for its effective management.
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keywords = animal
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23/92. endocarditis due to staphylococcus aureus after minor dog bite.

    Living in a society of animal lovers, the dangers are often not always apparent. Injury from bites and scratches is an occupational hazard for those people who work with animals. Despite the high risk of secondary wound infection as a result of an animal bite, many patients do not receive treatment with an antimicrobial medication. This report describes a case of a previously fit and well 66-year-old female dog handler who, after an apparently minor dog bite to the hand, developed fulminant acute staphylococcus aureus endocarditis and life-threatening aortic regurgitation. This article discusses the microbiology behind dog bites and highlights the need for proper wound hygiene and consideration of prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent potentially fatal outcomes as a result of what initially seem to be minor injuries.
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ranking = 3
keywords = animal
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24/92. Case report: isolation of a European bat lyssavirus type 2a from a fatal human case of rabies encephalitis.

    A 55-year-old bat conservationist was admitted to Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, scotland, on November 11, 2002, with an acute haematemesis. He gave a 5-day history of pain and paraesthesia in the left arm, followed by increasing weakness of his limbs with evidence of an evolving encephalitis with cerebellar involvement. The patient had never been vaccinated against rabies and did not receive postexposure treatment. Using a hemi-nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), saliva samples taken intravitam from different dates proved positive for rabies. A 400-bp region of the nucleoprotein gene was sequenced for confirmation and identified a strain of European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) type 2a. The diagnosis was confirmed using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and by RT-PCR on three brain samples (cerebellum, medulla, and hippocampus) taken at autopsy. In addition, a mouse inoculation test (MIT) was performed. Between 13 and 17 days postinfection, clinical signs of a rabies-like illness had developed in all five inoculated mice. brain smears from each infected animal were positive by the FAT and viable virus was isolated. This fatal incident is only the second confirmed case of an EBLV type-2 infection in a human after exposure to bats.
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25/92. pasteurella multocida infection of a total hip arthroplasty. A case report.

    The authors report a case history of a diabetic woman requiring revision hip arthroplasty of a Charnley total hip prosthesis that was infected with pasteurella multocida. The infection of the loose prosthesis followed a cat bite to the same leg. Advice is given on the management of patients with infection following animal inoculations, and the subject of increased risk with a loose prosthesis is discussed.
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keywords = animal
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26/92. Irukandji-like syndrome in South florida divers.

    Irukandji syndrome is a constellation of delayed severe local and systemic symptoms occurring after a Carukia barnesi box jellyfish sting involving any exposed skin. These cases are limited to australia, the habitat of that animal. Numerous other cases of an Irukandji-like syndrome after other small Carybdeid genus envenomations have been reported elsewhere in the world. There have yet been no reports of Irukandji-like syndrome occurring in continental US coastal waters. We describe 3 cases of marine envenomation causing such a symptom complex in US military combat divers off Key West, FL. It is unclear what species caused the injuries, but a member of the Carybdeid genus seems most likely.
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27/92. Fatal Pasteurella dagmatis peritonitis and septicaemia in a patient with cirrhosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Pasteurella species cause zoonotic infections in humans. Human pasteurella infections usually manifest as local skin or soft tissue infection following an animal bite or scratch. Systemic infections are less common and are limited to patients at the extremes of age or those who have serious underlying disorders, including cirrhosis. Most human pasteurella infections are caused by the multocida species. We report a case of Pasteurella dagmatis peritonitis and septicaemia in a patient with cirrhosis. The infection followed a scratch inflicted by a pet dog. Despite appropriate antibiotic treatment the infection proved fatal. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by P dagmatis has not been reported previously. Pasteurella dagmatis is a relatively recently described species, which is rarely reported as a human pathogen. This species may be misidentified unless commercial identification systems are supplemented by additional biochemical tests.
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keywords = animal
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28/92. Wild cat bite--a narrow escape.

    An unusual case is reported of a tiger bite and trauma to the maxillofacial region of a 45-year-old male patient. Wild animal assaults on the general population are on the increase in india and it is possible that further such cases will occur. The increased attacks could be a result of massive deforestation, resulting in disturbance to the ecosystem and tampering of the natural habitat of the royal cat.
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keywords = animal
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29/92. Fatal rat bite fever in a pet shop employee.

    BACKGROUND: Rat bite fever is a zoonotic disease that has been described in laboratory personnel as well as the general population. methods: A 24-year-old male pet shop employee contracted the disease through a minor superficial finger wound on a contaminated rat cage. The disease progressed from a flu-like illness to endocarditis involving first the aortic valve and then the mitral valve and septum. Despite aggressive therapy including two surgical procedures, the patient died from sepsis and multi-organ system failure 59 days after initial injury. RESULTS: This is the first reported case of rat-bite fever (RBF) in a pet shop work setting. CONCLUSIONS: Zoonotic infections may present a significant hazard to workers handling animals. education on hazards of animal contact and other preventive measures are needed in small places of business like pet shops.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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30/92. capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis with purpura fulminans and symmetrical gangrene following a dog bite in a shelter employee.

    The authors describe a fatal case of purpura fulminans with symmetrical peripheral gangrene and sepsis caused by capnocytophaga canimorsus in a 45-year-old, previously healthy woman who was bitten by a dog at an animal shelter where she was employed. Absent in this patient were the usual risk factors, including immunosuppression, alcohol abuse, corticosteroid therapy, and splenectomy. The patient's presentation to the emergency room late in the course of the infection probably effected her death. C canimorsus should be strongly suspected in any case of septicemia following a dog bite. Prompt therapy may influence the potentially fatal course of systemic infection. Employees and/or volunteers who work in animal shelters should be cognizant of the potential risks of a dog or cat bite and follow recommended procedures when such an incident occurs.
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