Cases reported "Bites and Stings"

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1/8. Incidental finding of a mucinous carcinoma of the breast by dynamic MRI in a patient with a history of breast trauma (horse bite): incidental mucinous carcinoma after breast trauma.

    Occasional reports on the coincidence of previous trauma of the breast and the development of invasive breast cancer have been published. Furthermore, traumatic changes of the breast tissue can clinically and radiographically mimic malignant breast disease. We report of a 52-year-old female presenting with increasing mammographic microcalcifications after a trauma of the breast due to a horse bite. Dynamic MRI was able to exclude malignancy at the site of the trauma but did detect a clinically and radiographically nonsymptomatic mucinous carcinoma of the breast.
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2/8. Evaluation of cases admitted to a center in Istanbul, turkey in 2003 for rabies vaccination and three rabies cases followed up in the last 15 years.

    We evaluated the cases of 7,266 individuals who applied to our hospital's Center for rabies vaccination between January and December 2003. Among 1,831 female and 5,435 male cases, 37% were given 3 doses of vaccination, 14% were given 5 doses, and in 24% of cases a 2-1-1 vaccination schedule was applied. Antirabies serum of horse origin was given in 179 cases. Regarding the wounds, 83% were superficial and 17% were deep. Most of the cases involved dog bites (74%). Of the dogs involved, 30% were pets (with owners). Only a few (6%) of those pets had been vaccinated. Of the 2 dogs investigated for rabies in Pendik Veterinarian research Institute, none were found to harbor the disease. In the last 15 years, 3 cases were followed up with a diagnosis of human rabies in our clinic. Domestic animals (without owners, living a somewhat wild life in cities) are still the cause of many rabies cases. As rabies carries a very high fatality risk, public health precautions and education are important as well as post-exposure prophylaxis.
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3/8. actinobacillus spp. and related bacteria in infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and sheep.

    We describe the isolation of actinobacillus lignieresii and an A. equuli-like bacterium from an infected horse-bite wound in a 22-year-old stable foreman and A. suis from a bite injury in a 35-year-old man who had been attacked by a horse. A. lignieresii was also isolated in pure culture from an infected sheep-bite wound in a rural worker. These species of the genus actinobacillus are primarily associated with animals and animal diseases and are rarely isolated from humans. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness of the possible occurrence of actinobacillus spp. in bite wounds inflicted by farm animals and to discuss the difficulties encountered in the identification of species of actinobacillus and related bacteria.
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keywords = horse
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4/8. Use of the labial artery for replantation of the lip and chin.

    A 12-year-old boy suffered from a full-thickness traumatic amputation of his lower lip and chin following a horse bite. Microsurgical technique was used to reanastomose the inferior labial artery and a vein of the chin. The replanted flap remained viable, and the patient has done well despite some early problems with eating and drooling. The patient is now able to purse his lips and has regained sensation and the use of his orbicularis oris and musculus mentalis, even though no attempt was made to repair the motor nerves or sensory nerves. Because of the potential superior cosmetic and functional results following replantation, we recommend aggressive microsurgical attempts at arterial and venous anastomosis not previously described following traumatic amputation. The inferior labial artery may be considered for use as a nutrient artery for replantation and in future elective maxillofacial reconstruction and free-flap transfer.
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keywords = horse
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5/8. pasteurella multocida in an infected tiger bite.

    We report an unusual case of pasteurella multocida wound infection caused by a tiger bite. We investigated the normal fang flora of large zoo cats and found P multocida in cultures from seven tigers, three of four leopards, and one lynx. sucrose fermentation was found to be highly media dependent and unpredictable. The literature relative to P multocida in bite-wound infections is reviewed with special reference to bites by animals other than cats and dogs. With the addition of the present case, the animals involved have been two rats, two opossums, two lions, one horse, one rabbit, one boar, one panther, and one tiger.
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6/8. Extensive gas in tissues of the forearm after horsebite.

    A 44-year-old man sustained lacerations of the forearm as a result of a horsebite. His arm became swollen after primary closure of the wounds, and a roentgenogram showed gas in the tissues of the forearm. streptococcus anginosus and S mutans were isolated from the wounds.
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7/8. Pasteurella caballi infection following a horse bite.

    The isolation of Pasteurella caballi from an horse-bite wound in a 56-year-old man is reported. Biochemical characteristics are described and compared with the other species representing the genus Pasteurella. This strain probably represents the first human isolate of P. caballi in france.
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8/8. Horse bite injury.

    Bite wounds are relatively frequent, the order of frequency being, dogs, cats and humans. The clinical importance of other types of bites depends on the severity of the injury or any subsequent infection. We report on the case of a woman bitten on her thigh by a horse, producing severe haematoma, fat necrosis and muscle rupture, without an external wound. We emphasize the importance of the ultrasound examination in the evaluation of the extent of the crush injury.
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