Cases reported "Bladder Exstrophy"

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1/67. prenatal diagnosis of bladder exstrophy: what counseling?

    PURPOSE: bladder exstrophy has recently become one of the several congenital malformations detectable prenatally by fetal ultrasonography, which implies the necessity of a correct prognostic evaluation of quality of life on which therapeutic termination of pregnancy may depend within the temporal limits stated by the law. While maintaining a preeminently informative role, prenatal counseling has gained increasing relevance for the quality of life long-term prognosis in adults affected by bladder exstrophy, particularly in regard to urinary continence, and sexual and reproductive problems in male and female individuals. We report a case of bladder exstrophy diagnosed at 22 week of gestation, and comprehensively review the literature on prenatal diagnostic tools and procedures as well as long-term followup in such cases. MATERIALS AND methods: At week 22 of gestation a woman underwent prognostic counseling due to the diagnosis of fetal bladder exstrophy made by prenatal ultrasound. After counseling the parents elected pregnancy termination. In addition, literature data were analyzed in regard to quality of life and bladder exstrophy. RESULTS: We believe that the rarity of the prenatal diagnosis of this abnormality has resulted in the lack of a comprehensive review of necessary counseling criteria. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest what we consider to be a valid counseling approach for parents after a prenatal diagnosis of bladder exstrophy.
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keywords = urinary
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2/67. Duplicate exstrophy of the bladder.

    Duplicate exstrophy of the bladder is a rare, distinct congenital anomaly without additional major anomalies of the urinary tract. A 15-year-old boy with duplicate exstrophy is reported on, and the possible role of bladder sequestration in the development of classical musculoskeletal deformities in this anomaly is discussed.
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keywords = urinary
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3/67. Exstrophy of the bladder.

    Exstrophy of the bladder is a rare congenital defect that occurs when the abdominal wall and underlying structures, including the ventral wall of the bladder, fail to fuse in utero. As a result, the lower urinary tract is exposed, and the everted bladder appears through the abdominal opening. Various surgical interventions have been employed with variable success in the hope of achieving complete dryness, full control over delivery of urine, freedom from catheters and external appliances, and a protected upper urinary tract. The most popular surgical approach is the primary bladder closure with secondary bladder neck reconstruction. Comprehensive nursing, medical, and surgical care are necessary to preserve renal and sexual function. The many complex problems experienced by these infants and their families call for a multidisciplinary approach. This article reviews occurrence, clinical presentation, and management of exstrophy of the bladder.
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ranking = 2
keywords = urinary
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4/67. Covered exstrophy with incomplete duplication of the bladder.

    A rare exstrophy variant in a 1(1/2)-year-old girl is reported. The child had a wide, scar-like lesion over the lower central abdomen with divarication of the recti and a spread symphysis pubis. The underlying bladder was divided into two unequal chambers by a complete sagittal septum with only the right chamber communicating with the single urethra and the left draining by a vesicocutaneous fistula. Both kidneys were normal. The clitoris was bifid and the anus anteriorly placed. Preliminary surgical management consisted of dissection of the bladder from its prevesical covering, excision of the sagittal septum, and cystocystostomy. Postoperatively, the child had normal urinary continence. The literature is reviewed with special reference to the various forms of duplicate exstrophy.
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ranking = 1.0354602112709
keywords = urinary, fistula
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5/67. The Mainz II pouch: experience in 5 patients with bladder exstrophy.

    PURPOSE: We report our experience with 5 patients with bladder exstrophy who underwent creation of a Mainz II pouch. MATERIALS AND methods: We retrospectively reviewed the results of the Mainz II pouch as a primary urinary diversion in 2 and a secondary urinary diversion in 3 patients. Each patient underwent multiple surgeries, including osteotomy in 1. All patients were followed postoperatively on a yearly basis. RESULTS: All patients are continent and the upper urinary tract is stable. CONCLUSIONS: The Mainz II pouch is appropriate for children born with a small fibrotic bladder, and as a salvage procedure for those who have endured multiple reconstructive procedures and remain incontinent. Furthermore, this procedure deserves serious consideration in children residing in developing countries.
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ranking = 3
keywords = urinary
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6/67. Inferior vesical fistula.

    Exstrophy variants are uncommon developmental anomalies of the bladder; the variants involving only the bladder neck are extremely rare. There are only two case reports of inferior vesical fissure to date, and inferior vesical fistula (IVF) as an exstrophy variant has not been described previously. We report a case of IVF in a 20-month-old female. The urethra was normal in calibre and position and the bladder capacity was adequate. Simple closure of the fistula was followed by a normal micturition pattern.
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ranking = 0.21276126762528
keywords = fistula
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7/67. uterine prolapse associated with bladder exstrophy: surgical management and subsequent pregnancy.

    Congenital bladder exstrophy affects 1 in 125,000 to 250,000 females. Consisting of absence of the anterior abdominal wall with exposure of the ureteral orifices, failure of pubic symphysis fusion, and deficient anterior pelvic diaphragm musculature, bladder exstrophy is frequently associated with genital prolapse. pregnancy may be complicated by recurrent urinary tract infections, preterm labor, mild procidentia, and malpresentation. Due to the rarity of the condition, there is a corresponding scarcity of obstetric literature regarding management during pregnancy. We report the case of a young woman with surgically repaired bladder exstrophy who developed genital prolapse. The uterus was suspended using a sacral colpopexy utilizing a Gore-Tex graft. Subsequently, the patient became pregnant and delivered a healthy male infant at 35 weeks' gestation via cesarean section (without recurrence of the genital prolapse postpartum). Sacral colpopexy to correct genital prolapse associated with bladder exstrophy may preserve fertility in young patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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8/67. Catheter knotting in a catheterizable urinary reservoir.

    An 11-year-old boy with bladder extrophy was treated ultimately with an ileocystoplasty and a catheterizable stoma. In attempting to drain his bladder via intermittent catheterization, the catheter became lodged. This case details the surgical treatment of a knotted catheter in an urinary reservoir.
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ranking = 5
keywords = urinary
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9/67. Pseudoexstrophy in a female child.

    A six-year-old female patient presenting with a swelling in the infraumbilical part of the abdomen, bulging out on straining, was diagnosed to have pseudoexstrophy bladder. The urinary tract was normal. The patient had bifid clitoris. There was no other associated malformation. Surgical repair of abdominal wall defect was done successfully. A new classification of exstrophy variants is proposed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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10/67. Bladder preservation in adult classic exstrophy: early results of four patients.

    OBJECTIVES: To report our experience with the treatment of classic exstrophy of the bladder in a small series of adult patients using ileocystoplasty, bladder neck reconstruction, and abdominal wall closure with flaps. The presentation of exstrophy of the bladder in adulthood is rare. The problems encountered include difficulty in abdominal closure, malignant potential, and upper tract dysfunction. The treatment of choice has been cystectomy with urinary diversion in all reported cases. methods: We treated 4 adult male patients with classic exstrophy of the bladder and complete epispadias. They had not received any previous treatment. Multiple random bladder biopsies revealed nonspecific inflammatory changes with focal areas of keratinization. Three patients were treated in two stages. The first stage included ileocystoplasty, bladder neck reconstruction, and abdominal wall closure with the use of flaps. The epispadias was repaired in the second stage. In 1 patient, the reconstruction was completed in a single stage. RESULTS: All patients were continent at the last follow-up visit, with three using self-catheterization and one voiding spontaneously. The renal parameters and ultrasound scans were normal at a follow-up of 2 to 48 months. cystoscopy performed at 6 months postoperatively revealed normal-looking mucosa in 2 patients and mild inflammation in 1 patient. Three patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results and one complained of the small size of his penis. All patients were evaluated by psychiatrists and revealed anxiety disorders preoperatively. After surgery, all demonstrated improved social interaction. CONCLUSIONS: Vesical preservation with primary reconstruction of bladder exstrophy in adults is safe and feasible in the absence of significant histologic changes in the bladder mucosa. Abdominal closure can be achieved without difficulty with the use of transposition flaps. However, these patients require strict follow-up to detect malignant transformation at an early stage.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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