Cases reported "Blast Injuries"

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1/5. Prevention of skin and soft tissue entrapment in tibial segment transportation.

    We report of a ten year old patient with soft tissue damage and bone defect of the tibia as a sequel of osteomyelitis. After excision and stabilization with an Ilizarov fixateur segment transportation was started. In order to avoid skin and soft tissue entrapment in the docking region, we used a metal cage as a space provider, which was shortened as segment transportation progressed. To our knowledge this simple method has not been described so far.
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keywords = tibia
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2/5. The "floating ankle": a pattern of violent injury. Treatment with thin-pin external fixation.

    The "floating ankle" is an underappreciated pattern of injury that results from violent trauma and/or blast injuries in military personnel. It is characterized by an intact ankle mortise with a distal tibia fracture and an ipsilateral foot fracture, creating instability around the ankle. This pattern of injury may be the result of the military boot, which both protects the foot from immediate amputation or further injury and renders the distal tibia susceptible to fracture at the boot top. Four patients with open floating ankle injuries were treated with thin-pin circular fixation with good results. Two patients required bone transport for segmental loss. All patients are ambulatory without assistance or bracing. Thin-pin external fixation is a reasonable approach to this complex injury pattern, especially in the presence of marked soft tissue compromise with or without segmental bone loss.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = tibia
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3/5. Multiple sequential posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms following high-energy injuries: case report and review of the literature.

    A 15-year-old boy sustained severe multisystem injuries from a satchel charge while in his native village in southern lebanon. After evacuation and resuscitation measures, he had successful intensive multidisciplinary surgical care. His long-bone fractures were stabilized by tubular external fixation systems, and his lacerated right tibialis anterior artery was grafted. Twenty days after injury, he developed a pseudoaneurysm of the left distal ulnar artery, which was surgically resected and the ulnar artery proximally ligated. Two weeks later, a pseudoaneurysm of the left peroneal artery, distal to the knee and coupled with an arteriovenous fistula, was diagnosed. This was treated by fluoroscopic controlled embolization with placement of stents. The patient recovered uneventfully. He was last seen two years after surgery, and no gross vascular compromise of any of his limbs was evident. This appears to be the only reported patient with late-developing multiple posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms after severe blast and shrapnel injuries. This development suggests that late sequelae of blast injuries may be topographically widespread and can evolve months after the injury. As such, these patients should be followed closely with a high degree of suspicion for the appearance of new signs or symptoms.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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4/5. Ilizarov external fixation in the management of bilateral, highly complex blast injuries of lower extremities: a report of two cases.

    Because of their complexity, war injuries inflicted by a blast mechanism often require tailoring of treatment to attain a more individualized solution. We report two cases of bilateral, severely mangled lower limbs with open tibial fractures and crush injuries to the feet. In each case, one limb had to be amputated below the knee, but the other limb was saved by immediate stabilization in a tubular external fixation frame crossing the knee; the frame was later replaced by a hybrid ring fixation frame with a freely moving knee. Such incidences are rare, and the particular management detailed here has not previously been reported in the literature.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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5/5. Salvage of a below knee amputation stump with a free sensate total sole flap preserving continuity of the posterior tibial nerve.

    We illustrate the use of a free sole flap with intact posterior tibial nerve in the coverage of a below knee amputation 6 months after an explosive injury to a 12-year-old child. We discuss the indications for lower leg amputation in children, modalities of reconstruction of the amputation stump and possible reason for the observed change of colour of the flap persisting for 14 days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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