Cases reported "Blast Injuries"

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1/10. Treatment of casualties of military conflicts at the Critical medicine Clinic of the Central Hospital in georgia.

    INTRODUCTION: Local military conflicts continue in many areas of the world. These conflicts produce multiple casualties to military personnel and civilians. This paper describes one aspect of the medical care required for victims of the civil conflict in the Republic of georgia. methods: Interviews with patients and their accompanying persons and abstraction of medical records. RESULTS: Data were acquired on 108 victims admitted to the Center for Critical medicine in Tbilisi. Three stages in the care of these victims are described: 1) battlefield and transportation; 2) regional, front-line hospitals; and 3) the Central Hospital. The performance of each stage is described. Distribution of injuries and procedures performed in the third stage of treatment are described and survivors are defined. For illustration, two cases are reviewed in detail. CONCLUSIONS: The results are encouraging. Major problems existed in the treatment and evacuation of the wounded. Furthermore, many of the victims were injured because of their carelessness and lack of experience on the battlefield.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transport
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2/10. An open fracture of the ulna with bone loss, treated by bone transport.

    We report a Gustilo and Anderson IIIc fracture of the ulna with 8 cm of bone loss which was reconstructed primarily by the technique of external fixation and bone transport. Five operations were performed over a period of 14 months (treatment index = 52.5 days/cm). A satisfactory functional result was achieved, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for difficult forearm reconstructions and comparing favourably with other methods of managing large bone and soft tissue defects.
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ranking = 5
keywords = transport
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3/10. Prevention of skin and soft tissue entrapment in tibial segment transportation.

    We report of a ten year old patient with soft tissue damage and bone defect of the tibia as a sequel of osteomyelitis. After excision and stabilization with an Ilizarov fixateur segment transportation was started. In order to avoid skin and soft tissue entrapment in the docking region, we used a metal cage as a space provider, which was shortened as segment transportation progressed. To our knowledge this simple method has not been described so far.
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ranking = 6
keywords = transport
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4/10. Transient vestibular balance dysfunction after primary blast injury.

    Explosive munitions are used routinely in support of military operations. Moreover, service personnel are increasingly being deployed to regions where active conflict, terrorism, and land mines pose significant threats. Despite aggressive protective measures and safety practices, blast injury is an inherent risk. In contrast to secondary and tertiary blast injuries, primary blast injuries are generally limited to the air-filled organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and auditory systems. We report the case of a Marine who entered the back-blast arc of a shoulder-launched multipurpose assault weapon at close range. Despite the magnitude of the blast, he sustained none of the classic findings suggestive of severe primary blast injury. However, he manifested unique vestibular balance abnormalities that precluded his return to full duty for several months. This suggests that personnel who sustain even a mild traumatic brain injury with vestibular manifestations may need prolonged observation and modified duty in certain military occupational specialties.
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ranking = 0.45154562080507
keywords = service
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5/10. The "floating ankle": a pattern of violent injury. Treatment with thin-pin external fixation.

    The "floating ankle" is an underappreciated pattern of injury that results from violent trauma and/or blast injuries in military personnel. It is characterized by an intact ankle mortise with a distal tibia fracture and an ipsilateral foot fracture, creating instability around the ankle. This pattern of injury may be the result of the military boot, which both protects the foot from immediate amputation or further injury and renders the distal tibia susceptible to fracture at the boot top. Four patients with open floating ankle injuries were treated with thin-pin circular fixation with good results. Two patients required bone transport for segmental loss. All patients are ambulatory without assistance or bracing. Thin-pin external fixation is a reasonable approach to this complex injury pattern, especially in the presence of marked soft tissue compromise with or without segmental bone loss.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transport
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6/10. Tire explosion injuries to the upper extremity.

    Several articles have been published that bring attention to the destructive potential of tire explosions. Although the severity of tire explosion injuries to the head and neck region is well established, only one previous article has reported injuries to the upper extremity. Fourteen patients with upper extremity tire explosion injuries have been treated by us from 1980 to 1988. Each injury was caused by single-piece wheel assemblies, as opposed to multipiece wheel assemblies, which have traditionally been associated with the injury. Three representative patient reports are discussed. Prevention of this injury can be achieved by increased public awareness, formal industrial safety training, tire servicing with dedicated equipment including restraining devices or barriers, complete evaluation of wheel/tire serviceability before tire mounting, separation of servicing of single and multipiece wheels, and complete tire deflation before servicing.
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ranking = 0.45154562080507
keywords = service
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7/10. Intravascular bullet migration: a report of two cases.

    In the trauma setting, penetrating vascular injuries secondary to gunshot wounds need to be addressed promptly and carefully. By identifying the entry and exit sites, the pathway of injury can usually be determined. Vessel injury is typically related to direct vascular trauma or secondary blast injury. On rare occasions, the involved vessels can serve as conduits, transporting projectiles to various locations remote from the entry wounds. The cases described demonstrate different manifestations of bullet embolism within the arterial and venous systems. We provide a literature review and we discuss therapeutic options available in these unique scenarios.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transport
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8/10. Biological foreign body implantation in victims of the london July 7th suicide bombings.

    On the morning of July 7, 2005, a co-ordinated attack by suicide bombers on the london public transport system resulted in four explosions at densely packed civilian targets. Of the victims of these attacks, 194 were treated at the Royal london Hospital, where among the most severely injured an unusual pattern of injury was seen. Bone fragments from other victims (or possible the bomber) were found embedded as biological foreign bodies within the soft tissues of several patients. We present case reports of five of these patients, and discuss problems arising from the management of their injuries. Allogenic bony foreign bodies, rarely reported in the medical literature, present unusual problems in their management, in particular the risk of transmitting blood borne diseases, which should be anticipated and addressed in a hospital's major incident planning.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transport
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9/10. Physical medicine and rehabilitation in the military: Operation Iraqi freedom.

    This article describes the role of a physical medicine and rehabilitation (physiatry) physician (physiatrist) as a general medical officer within a forward support battalion during the invasion and nation-building phases of Operation Iraqi freedom. Between March 10 and May 3, 2003 (invasion phase), 364 patients were evaluated. Thirty-two percent had musculoskeletal noncombat injuries, 9% had combat-related traumatic injuries, and the remaining 59% had nontrauma/nonmusculoskeletal conditions. Between May 4 and July 25, 2003 (nation-building phase), 1,387 patients were evaluated. Of these, 19% had musculoskeletal injuries, 1% had combat-related traumatic injuries, and the remaining 80% had nontrauma/nonmusculoskeletal conditions. During this nation-building phase, the musculoskeletal workload seen at the division-level combat support hospital was 4 times the workload seen in the forward support battalion. This experience underscores the role of physiatry in wartime casualty management and profiles the combat support hospital as the most suitable place for the physiatrist during wartime. Interventions focused on acute management and rehabilitation counseling for all musculoskeletal injuries, as well as consultation services to the combat support hospital and local civilian hospitals for the evaluation of complex neuromusculoskeletal trauma cases.
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ranking = 0.45154562080507
keywords = service
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10/10. The St Marys fragmentation grenade explosion.

    The accidental explosion of a fragmentation grenade in a munitions factory at St Marys injured four workers, two critically. The prompt response by ambulances and physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service prevented deaths, but the incident suggests lessons for the future handling of urban explosions.
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ranking = 0.45154562080507
keywords = service
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