Cases reported "Blepharoptosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/15. Kearns syndrome or Kearns disease. Further evidence of a genuine entity in a case with uncommon features.

    A 20-year-old man with the characteristic findings of infantile onset Kearns syndrome is described. Morphological and biochemical investigations proved a mitochondrial disease which we believe to be the cause of the symptoms in various organs. We assume an autosomal-dominant inheritance, the marker sign of which is blepharoptosis in several family members. Characteristic clinical, morphological and biochemical findings, combined with an autosomal-dominant inheritance with very variable expression, mark the Kearns syndrome as an individual disease, not as a symptom complex (syndrome). Kearns disease can be divided into three forms--an infantile form ("kearns-sayre syndrome') with early onset, rapid progression, multisystemic involvement and a severe course; and a juvenile and an adult form with onset in the second, respectively third (or later) decades with a generally slower and more benign course and less widespread expression in various organ systems. Furthermore, the occurrence of a curious orthoptic abnormality is described, indicating one of the possible ways to avoid diplopia in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia: the coexistence of normal and gliding abnormal retinal correspondence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = chronic progressive
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/15. Silicone rod frontalis sling for the correction of blepharoptosis.

    A frontalis sling procedure for blepharoptosis using a 1 mm solid silicone rod is described. This procedure is ideal for patients requiring frontalis suspension who are at risk for postoperative exposure keratopathy, or for patients likely to need postoperative eyelid position adjustment. These would include individuals with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, third nerve paralysis, and myasthenia gravis. The advantages of this technique are the elasticity and the availability of the silicone rod, together with formation of an eyelid crease and ability postoperatively to adjust the position of the upper eyelid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = chronic progressive
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/15. Surgical treatment of myogenic blepharoptosis.

    We describe the surgical approach of two patients with myogenic blepharoptosis. The ptosis is caused by a glycogenosis type II (Pompe disease) in the first case and is due to a juvenile, chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (kearns-sayre syndrome) in the second case. The first patient presented a unilateral ptosis. The ptosis in the second patient was bilateral and manifest. The eyelids could only be opened manually. A resection of the palpebral levator muscle was carried out under local anesthesia. The choice of the technique will be explained. The amount of levator resection was calculated considering the residual eyelid motility and Bell's phenomenon. Electronmicroscopy of the resected levator muscle will be discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = chronic progressive
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/15. Unilateral ptosis as an initial manifestation of D-penicillamine induced myasthenia gravis.

    We describe 2 patients presenting with isolated unilateral ptosis without other signs of cranial or peripheral nerve involvement or sympathetic denervation. Both patients (one case of progressive systemic sclerosis and one of rheumatoid arthritis) were currently taking D-penicillamine. In these cases, the ptosis was reversed a few minutes after a Tensilon test, hallmark of myasthenia gravis. antibodies to acetylcholine receptors were present. myasthenia gravis should be suspected with ptosis without other cranial nerve involvement or miosis, even if the ptosis is unilateral. Thus, unilateral ptosis can be the first manifestation of a toxic side reaction to D-penicillamine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00034176863465467
keywords = sclerosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/15. Combination ptosis crutch and moisture chamber for management of progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    BACKGROUND: A 46-year-old woman with a long-standing history of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia manifested a primary visual symptom of bilateral ptosis. Previous lid surgery was unsuccessful because of severe sight-threatening exposure keratitis. CASE REPORT: The patient's problem was managed by fabricating a spectacle-mounted combination ptosis crutch and moisture chamber. The custom device successfully provided both cosmetic and visual relief for the patient while maintaining corneal integrity. CONCLUSIONS: This case demonstrates the effectiveness of a dual-purpose appliance that offers a cosmetically viable alternative to ptosis patients who are high-risk surgical candidates because of potential corneal dehydration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = chronic progressive
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous |


Leave a message about 'Blepharoptosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.