Cases reported "Blindness"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. Agenesis of the corpus callosum in a child with Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    A 2.5-year-old male infant with agenesis of the corpus callosum and Leber's congenital amaurosis is described. The infant had nystagmus as the presenting sign. The fundi showed circumscribed macular atrophy with encircling retinal pigment epithelial hyperplasia (macular coloboma-like lesions), attenuation of the retinal arterioles, and very fine pigment dusting in the peripheral retina. Photopic and scotopic ERG were extinguished. Even though this is an exceedingly rare association, these findings along with neurological symptoms should alert the physician to conduct prompt cranial imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Occlusions of branch retinal arterioles following amniotic fluid embolism.

    amniotic fluid embolism is a serious complication of pregnancy with a high mortality. We present a 28-year-old healthy woman who underwent dilatation and curettage for an elective abortion, followed by the sudden loss of vision in her left eye. Occlusion of one branch retinal arteriole was the initial finding of her left fundus, and two occlusions developed consecutively on the color fundus photographs. fluorescein angiography demonstrated occlusions in three retinal arterioles among seven retinal arterioles originating from the optic disc. These findings suggest that possible mechanisms of amniotic fluid embolism are the unusual cause in retinal arteriolar occlusions. Here clinical course and ophthalmic findings are reviewed, and the relationship between amniotic fluid embolism and retinal arteriolar occlusions is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. Case presentations of retinal artery occlusions.

    BACKGROUND: Retinal artery occlusions typically result in sudden, unilateral painless loss of vision and may have varying presentations. They are associated with systemic diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and valvular heart disease. Additional risk factors include diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, giant-cell arteritis, and hyperlipidemia. They most often occur in persons 60 to 80 years of age. methods: Four patients have come to our clinics with varying degrees of visual loss as a result of retinal artery occlusions. The types of arteriolar occlusions presented include: precapillary arteriole occlusion, cilioretinal artery occlusion, branch retinal artery occlusion, and central retinal artery occlusion. RESULTS: patients were followed for their ocular involvement, but also included was medical management of the underlying systemic disease condition. Workup of retinal artery occlusion included laboratory testing, carotid duplex scans, and echocardiograms to uncover the possible systemic etiologies of the artery occlusion. CONCLUSION: Optometrists should recognize the signs and symptoms of the various arterial obstructions and refer patients for systemic treatment as indicated. patients who manifest retinal or pre-retinal artery occlusions should undergo thorough systemic evaluations for vascular disease, including: atherosclerotic disease, hypertension, and valvular heart disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. Bilateral retinal occlusion progressing to long-lasting blindness in severe preeclampsia.

    BACKGROUND: Temporary blindness in pregnancy associated with preeclampsia has been reported. Most cases have been attributed to cortical cerebral edema with transient vision impairment. We present a patient with bilateral retinal arteriole occlusions causing permanent blindness. CASE: A teenage primigravida at term presented with uterine contractions and preeclampsia. Twenty-four hours after delivery she developed sudden visual loss that progressed to total bilateral blindness. Imaging studies ruled out cerebral edema and an ophthalmologic examination found retinal hemorrhages and infarcts consistent with bilateral central retinal arteriole occlusions. At 2- and 6-month follow-up there was marked persistent visual impairment. CONCLUSION: The combination of blindness and preeclampsia is rare. Evaluation for ophthalmologic findings should be part of the initial patient assessment with preeclampsia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. Sudden blindness associated with central nervous symptoms in a hemodialysis patient.

    Purtscher's-like retinopathy as a cause of sudden blindness in hemodialysis patients is not widely known. This is believed to occur secondary to leukoembolization to retinal arterioles following complement activation. We describe a patient who developed sudden but reversible loss of vision on hemodialysis associated with varying reversible neurological signs and symptoms which we felt may have been a manifestation of leukoembolic aggregates lodging in the arterioles of the retina and central nervous system circulations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. A pedigree of Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    A pedigree of Leber's congenital amaurosis compatible with autosomal recessive trait is reported. Two male infants from consanguineous parents had remarkable visual loss within the first year of life, with sluggish pupillary responses, poor fixations, minimal eyeground changes and absent electroretinograms on presentations at the ages of four or 14 months. follow-up studies revealed definite progressions of eyeground abnormalities consisting of attenuated retinal arterioles, pepper- and salt-like appearance with numerous yellowish-white punctate lesions in the midperiphery, and pale optic nerves. Fluorescein angiographic study performed on one case showed multiple hyperfluorescent spots over the posterior and midperipheral eyegrounds suggesting alterations of the retinal pigment epithelium. These functional and morphological abnormalities of the retina were similar in the two siblings. Cycloplegic refractions revealed slight myopic or mixed astigmatism, but no marked hyperopia. The patients had normal physical and mental developments with no obvious systemic complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Retinal arteriolar occlusion in multiple sclerosis.

    A 25-year-old white man presented with acute multiple sclerosis manifested by right blindness, difficulty urinating, and paresthesias and weakness of both legs. Retinal examination revealed a distal occlusion of the descending branch of the superior temporal arteriole leading to an area of retinal ischemia of the right eye. The optic disc was edematous, and there were focal areas of periphlebitis. All retinal signs resolved in three weeks, and the only abnormality that persisted was a pale right optic disc. The finding of small arteriolar disease is unusual and may represent another possible pathogenetic mechanism in multiple sclerosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Recurrent visual loss in homozygous sickle cell disease.

    In sickle cell retinopathy vascular involvement is most frequently recognised at the retinal periphery, but obstruction of perimacular arterioles and of major retinal vessels may also occur. This report describes a patient with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease with recurrent occlusion of major retinal vessels associated with recurring transient impairment of visual function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. Occlusion of the central retinal artery after retrobulbar corticosteroid injection.

    Occlusion of the central retinal artery with loss of all vision occurred in a 38-year-old white woman given a retrobulbar injection of betamethasone acetate and betamethasone disodium phosphate (Celestone Soluspan) for the treatment of a retrobulbar neuritis. ophthalmoscopy revealed embolic, whitish material within several of the small retinal arterioles and capillaries. This, together with the absence of any signs of retrobulbar hemorrhage, suggested that the corticosteroid material was accidentally injected into a branch of the central retinal artery and subsequently passed into the main vessel.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Unilateral morbus Purtscher with poor visual outcome.

    Two cases are presented, one with a pure cranial compression injury, the other mainly with chest trauma. Both patients noted immediate unilateral blindness. Vision did not improve in either within four months. fluorescein angiography was performed and showed arteriolar as well as venous damage, with occlusion of arterioles and venules. As the impact in morbus Purtscher is usually very brief, reflux cannot explain the fundus changes. More likely a pressure wave is the cause of vessel damage with subsequent infiltration of blood, or plasma, into the wall of the vessel and obliteration of the lumen; it is also a cause of rupture of capillaries and hemorrhage. In traumatic asphyxia, on the contrary, a sustained force leads to reflux of blood and massive congestion with subsequent vessel damage and diapedesis. The prognosis in morbus Purtscher is often poor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = arteriole
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Blindness'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.