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1/2. Successful management of complications from distraction osteogenesis after osteosarcoma resection: a case report.

    We report a complicated case of osteosarcoma of the proximal tibia. A 15-year-old boy was referred to us and underwent distraction osteogenesis reconstruction. We administered preoperative chemotherapy for five cycles. Clinical response was determined to be complete by radiography. Marginal excision was then performed with preservation of the proximal tibial epiphysis. Metaphyseal reconstruction (type 2) was performed with distraction osteogenesis. Postoperative chemotherapy also was administered for five cycles. Two years later, the patient developed a deep infection. He underwent curettage and a pedicle peroneal flap transfer, which did not cure the infection. Infected tissues were excised, and shortening-distraction was carried out with the Ilizarov frame. The infection was cured; however, a leg length discrepancy and deformity resulted from frame instability. Four years after the initial operation, the patient fractured his reconstructed leg in a traffic accident. We performed osteosynthesis, deformity correction, and lengthening with the Ilizarov method. We were able to correct the defects using distraction osteogenesis, eventually restoring normal function. Epiphyseal preservation and reconstruction by distraction osteogenesis can provide an excellent outcome, resulting in a stable reconstruction that functionally restores the native limb. Distraction osteogenesis avoids some complications but may involve others, which require detection and appropriate management.
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2/2. scedosporium apiospermum mycetoma with bone involvement successfully treated with voriconazole.

    Treatment of scedosporium apiospermum mycetoma usually requires limb amputation. A 49-year-old woman, from Ivory Coast, was diagnosed with Madura foot in 1995. She failed to respond to several treatments including itraconazole, fluconazole and co-trimoxazole, and refused limb amputation. In December 2002 she was admitted to hospital in france with a painful, swollen right leg and foot. She had no fever and c-reactive protein was 120 mg/l. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the destruction of tarsus bones with a tibia extension. Voriconazole (400 mg/day) treatment was initiated in March 2003; a significant clinical improvement was observed within 4 months as confirmed by c-reactive protein (16 mg/l) and MRI. Voriconazole was maintained for 18 months with good tolerance. cholestasis appeared after the first month and remained stable. In October 2004 voriconazole was discontinued due to side effects on the liver (alanine aminotransferase 17 times the normal level); MRI showed impressive regression of bone lesions. As of July 2005, the patient remains clinically well. Voriconazole appears to be a promising drug for the treatment of S. apiospermum mycetomas.
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