Cases reported "Bone Diseases"

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11/35. Congenital onychodysplasia of the index fingers.

    Twenty-two fingers of 13 patients had dysplastic nails. Four types of congenital onychodysplasia of the index fingers such as anonychia, rudimentary, split rudimentary (polyonychia), and micronychia were found in five, three, eight, and six fingers, respectively. Narrowing at the distal end of the affected distal phalanx (lack of the cresent-shaped cap), and a Y-shaped bony projection were characteristic features seen on x-ray films. There were no associated ectodermal abnormalities. syndactyly was a relatively common associated hand anomaly. Some cases of congenital onychodysplasia of the index fingers were inherited. These findings suggest that impediments to the membranous ossification center can lead to a dysplastic crescent-shaped cap with nail anomalies.
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12/35. klippel-trenaunay-weber syndrome variant.

    We describe a patient with soft-tissue and bony hypertrophy of all four limbs. The upper limbs were erythematous, with associated finger deformity. The soft-tissue irregular hypertrophy and engorgement subsided when the limbs were elevated. Retinal examination showed large, dilated, tortuous veins, with no dye leakage on fluorescein angiography. We feel that this case represents an unusual variant of the klippel-trenaunay-weber syndrome.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = finger
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13/35. Total osteolysis of the mandibular condyle in progressive systemic sclerosis.

    This report calls attention to the complete resorption of the mandibular condyle in progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), a previously unreported finding. This was associated with osteolysis of the ipsilateral coronoid process, both mandibular angles, and autoamputation of the fingertips. The Panorex provides a simple, effective method for studying the mandible in systemic sclerosis. Similar mandibular osteolysis with vinyl chloride exposure is noted.
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keywords = finger
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14/35. Periosteal new bone formation and disseminated granulomatosis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    In a 20-year-old man, a proliferative periosteal new bone growth developed over the left forearm. Crohn's disease had been diagnosed the year before. Bone biopsy demonstrated granuloma formation. biopsy specimens of skin lesions demonstrated granulomas as well. Bowel studies indicated active small intestinal inflammation with fistula formation. Despite the superficial resemblance to hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, it is believed that this case represents Crohn's disease with disseminated granulomatosis involving skin and periosteum.
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ranking = 24.23138766653
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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15/35. Skeletal involvement in sarcoidosis: a case report.

    A patient is described in whom sarcoidosis caused a pathological fracture of the middle phalanx of the little finger. A bone scan showed increased uptake. She was treated by resection of the diseased area and bone grafting, which led to bone healing. The bony manifestations of sarcoidosis are reviewed.
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16/35. Aneurysmal bone cyst involving the hand: a review and report of two cases.

    Two cases of aneurysmal bone cyst occurred in the hand. One involved the distal phalanx and followed a crushing injury to the tip of the finger; amputation of the part resulted in cure. The other involved almost all of the first metacarpal and was resected and replaced by an iliac bone graft. The appearance of an aneurysmal bone cyst in roentgenograms and after angiography usually is not diagnostic, although benign, progressive growth and potential for recurrence require complete removal.
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keywords = finger
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17/35. Giant cell reaction of small bones.

    A radiographically nonspecific lytic lesion in the middle phalanx of the index finger with microscopic evidence of a benign fibrous stroma with giant cells and osteoid was investigated in an 18-year-old man. Giant cell reaction is a rare, benign lesion of the small bones of the hands and feet. Trauma as the cause of a giant cell lesion poses an interesting question.
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18/35. Diabetic osteoarthropathy versus diabetic osteomyelitis.

    The differentiation between diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis is a very difficult one to make, even in the presence of a pedal ulceration. However, considering present medical costs, the incorrect diagnosis of osteomyelitis can be a costly one, not only for the hospital, but also for the patient. In light of a normal white blood cell count, a benign 67Ga-citrate scan, and two noncontiguous areas of bone destruction, the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy can be made without the necessity of a bone biopsy.
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ranking = 145.38832599918
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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19/35. giant lymph node hyperplasia with osteoblastic bone lesions and the POEMS (Takatsuki's) syndrome.

    A 38-year-old black man with giant lymph node hyperplasia (GLH), osteoblastic lesions, and the poems syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes) was treated at the University of chicago hospitals. The patient had hepatosplenomegaly and generalized peripheral lymphadenopathy. Endocrinologic abnormalities included decreased testosterone with elevated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, as well as hyperprolactinemia and possible hypothyroidism. biopsy of a right femoral lymph node revealed GLH, and an osteoblastic pelvic lesion showed a marked lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. By immunohistochemical techniques, plasma cells in the lymph node and osteoblastic lesion were polyclonal. A polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia was present. The lymph node T-lymphocyte population showed a decreased helper-to-suppressor cell ratio. Other findings included thickening of the skin, finger clubbing, and anasarca. A severe sensory-motor polyneuropathy was the major factor contributing to the patient's death. The association of GLH, osteoblastic bone lesions, and the poems syndrome has been noted previously in japan; however, the authors are unaware of reports on Western patients who had this combination of clinical and laboratory findings.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = finger
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20/35. Epiphyseal destruction of children's hands after frostbite: a report of two cases.

    Two cases of epiphyseal destruction resulting from frostbite in the hands of children are reported. The most significant change observed on the x-ray film was the absence of the epiphyses. Stunted growth and mild flexion deformity of the fingers are characteristic sequelae.
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