Cases reported "Bone Diseases"

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1/14. Massive pelvic and femoral pseudotumoral osteolysis secondary to an uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    A 51 year-old man developed an extensive osteolytic response to wear debris in an uncemented porous-coated total hip arthroplasty, with metal/polyethylene interface, which had been implanted eighteen years previously. This reaction, which involved the upper femur and the ilium, produced a mass which compressed the pelvic viscera.
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ranking = 1
keywords = osteolysis
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2/14. Skeletal cystic angiomatosis with severe hip joint deformation resembling massive osteolysis.

    An aggressive destruction pattern resulting in joint deformation has not been described in skeletal cystic angiomatosis (SCA) so far. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy with such findings strongly resembling Gorham's disease (massive osteolysis). Since the prognosis of the latter entity tends to be less favorable than in SCA, particularly SCA without extraskeletal involvement, careful differentiation of both disorders appears to be important.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = osteolysis
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3/14. Use of bisphosphonate to manage avulsion fracture of tibial tuberosity with underlying angiomatosis: a case report.

    An unusual case of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity with underlying angiomatosis in a middle-aged man is described, with particular emphasis on the successful use of bisphosphonate in its treatment and the value of serial dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in its subsequent disease monitoring. This case illustrates the importance of careful correlation of the clinical, radiological, and histological findings in the management of skeletal tumour and tumour-like lesions. The differential diagnosis of osteolysis with vascular ectasia is discussed.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = osteolysis
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4/14. Report on a case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria, with special reference to orthopedic problems.

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a very rare syndrome of premature aging and often features many orthopedic abnormalities. This is a case report on a young boy suffering from progeria. His orthopedic history included bilateral talus deformities of the feet, bilateral dislocated hips, pes planus, a fractured femur (which healed without complications), aseptic necrosis in the left nuclear head of the femur, bilateral fixed hip flexion deformities, bone dysplasia, osteoporosis and osteolysis.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = osteolysis
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5/14. The skeleton in congenital, generalized lipodystrophy: evaluation using whole-body radiographic surveys, magnetic resonance imaging and technetium-99m bone scintigraphy.

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare genetic disease characterized by the absence of body fat from birth. Focal bone lesions have also been reported, but their pathophysiology is poorly understood. To characterize skeletal abnormalities further in 3 patients with CGL, we employed whole-body radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, including gadolinium enhancement), and triple phase technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy. Radiographs showed numerous focal lesions within the long bones, as described in other reports. MRI showed that the entire marrow space of the long bones was abnormal and was characterized, at least in part, by the absence of marrow fat. Prolonged T1 and T2 times and marked gadolinium enhancement were observed in radiographically normal-appearing long bone. Radiographically lytic lesions occasionally demonstrated fluid-fluid levels on MRI and enhanced peripherally after gadolinium infusion. Bone scintigraphy findings such as periarticular hyperemia were relative subtle. We conclude that the appendicular skeleton of patients with CGL is diffusely abnormal and is predisposed to focal osteolysis and cyst formation.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = osteolysis
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6/14. Phalangeal microgeodic syndrome resulting in rapid digital shortening.

    Microgeodic phalangeal syndrome is a rare condition affecting the fingers in children. Radiographically, the affected phalanges show sclerosis with multiple small areas of osteolysis. The pathogenesis of microgeodic phalangeal syndrome is considered to be a transient disturbance of the peripheral circulation caused by cold temperatures. In most cases, the symptoms and the radiographic changes return to normal within several months without any treatment. We present a rare case of microgeodic phalangeal syndrome in the middle phalanx of the right index finger in an 8-year-old girl, in whom the affected phalanx shortened within 6 weeks of the initial presentation. It was speculated that minor trauma to the finger might have contributed to the collapse and shortening of the phalanx. The current case indicates that the use of a splint for the affected finger in the early period after onset of symptoms might be recommended to avoid digital shortening.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = osteolysis
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7/14. pyoderma gangrenosum with a contiguous erosion of the distal ulna.

    BACKGROUND: pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) has been described in association with sterile neutrophilic infiltration of several organ systems, including the skeleton. The most frequent cause of bony disease in PG has been chronic, recurrent, multifocal osteomyelitis, a sterile inflammatory disease of children and young adults mimicking infectious osteomyelitis. Bony erosions have been only rarely described in direct contiguity to a PG ulcer.OBJECTIVE: We report a 53-year-old woman with recurrent PG who developed an erosion of the distal ulna adjacent to a PG ulcer. The patient responded to high-dose prednisone, and a repeat radiograph of the wrist four months later was normal.CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates another example of cortical osteolysis directly adjacent to a PG ulcer in which the bony changes may be neutrophil-induced.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = osteolysis
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8/14. Idiopathic multicentric osteolysis.

    A 59 year old while female with striking carpal and tarsal osteolysis is reported. The process primarily involves the carpals and tarsals but includes other sites. The pertinent literature is reviewed and a simplified classification of idiopathic multicentric osteolysis is presented. Idiopathic multicentric osteolysis may be sporadic but can demonstrate either dominant or recessive inheritance. There may or may not be associated nephropathy. The underlying mechanism appears similar in all variations of this condition. Gorham's disease, the Winchester syndrome, and other osteolytic conditions which may predominantly affect the tarsal and carpal bones most likely are totally different processes, unrelated to idiopathic multicentric osteolysis.
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ranking = 2
keywords = osteolysis
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9/14. Total osteolysis of the mandibular condyle in progressive systemic sclerosis.

    This report calls attention to the complete resorption of the mandibular condyle in progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), a previously unreported finding. This was associated with osteolysis of the ipsilateral coronoid process, both mandibular angles, and autoamputation of the fingertips. The Panorex provides a simple, effective method for studying the mandible in systemic sclerosis. Similar mandibular osteolysis with vinyl chloride exposure is noted.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = osteolysis
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10/14. The syndrome of idiopathic osteolysis. classification, review, and case report.

    Idiopathic osteolysis is characterised by a spontaneous onset without previous causative factors, followed by rapid destruction and resorption of the involved bones. This process can result in severe deformities with joint subluxation and instability. In certain forms an associated malignant nephropathy may develop. A case report is presented which illustrates the destructive nature of the process.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = osteolysis
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