Cases reported "Bone Diseases"

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11/30. plasma cell sclerosis of bone: a spectrum of disease.

    We describe the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic manifestations of a group of disorders characterized by osteosclerosis in association with plasmacytic infiltration of bone marrow. These conditions include multiple myeloma, plasma cell granuloma, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, the poems syndrome (plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, and skin changes), and chronic symmetric plasma cell osteomyelitis of childhood. Although clinically unrelated in many respects, features shared by these diseases support the existence of a specific factor linking the plasma cell to local osteogenesis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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12/30. Bone imaging of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis in palmoplantar pustulosis.

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is a rare syndrome that is characterized by hyperostosis and soft tissue ossification between the clavicles and the anterior part of the upper ribs. This syndrome frequently is found in the case of palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP), especially in japan. There have been few published reports, however, of Tc-99m MDP bone imaging findings in PPP. Eleven patients with PPP who were suspected to have sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis were studied with Tc-99m MDP whole body bone imaging. Bone images were abnormal in 11 patients. Abnormal radionuclide concentrations were observed in the sternoclavicular, sternocostal, and manubriosternal joints, in the ribs, and in the sternum. whole body imaging revealed radionuclide accumulations unexpectedly in other bones such as the vertebrae, femur, tibia, or sacroiliac joints in five of 11 cases. Radiographs were available in nine patients. Three chest radiographs were negative, and six showed various degrees of hyperostosis or sclerotic changes in sternoclavicular, sternocostal, or manubriosternal joints, or in the sternum or anterior upper ribs. These bone lesions usually were more prominent and more easily recognized with bone scintigraphy. Bone scintigraphy should be used as a routine procedure in patients with PPP who are suspected to have sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis.
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ranking = 6.0146855324093
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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13/30. Scintigraphic detection of clavicular hyperostosis in a patient with fulminant acne.

    Intense Tc-99m MDP uptake in both clavicles was noted in a patient with fulminant acne. X-ray examination and biopsy performed later showed hyperostosis.
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ranking = 0.02447588734877
keywords = hyperostosis
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14/30. Bone formation induced in an infant by systemic prostaglandin-E2 administration.

    We report a case of long-term systemic administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to a newborn infant with ductus-dependent congenital heart disease. After 46 days of treatment, radiography showed cortical hyperostosis of the long bones. The child died 62 days after discontinuation of prostaglandin treatment. Histologic examination of tubular bones showed hyperostosis presumably due to prostaglandin-induced rapid formation of primitive bone. The additional finding of extensive resorption of the outer cortical surface and bone formation at the inner surface suggested a reversible phase after discontinuation of treatment.
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ranking = 0.0097903549395079
keywords = hyperostosis
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15/30. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: rheumatologic, radiologic, and dermatologic characteristics.

    Two recently observed patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis exemplify the characteristic presentation of this rheumatologic disorder. We describe its manifestations, review the literature on this subject, and discuss clinical and radiologic aspects, including the frequently associated dermatologic disorder palmoplantar pustulosis. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is an increasingly common diagnosis, and practicing physicians should be aware of the distinctive features that allow accurate differentiation from psoriatic arthritis and other diseases.
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ranking = 1.0244758873488
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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16/30. A radionuclide and radiographic diagnosis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis.

    Imaging features of a case of sternoclavicular hyperostosis are described, and the pathologic and clinical features of this uncommon entity are discussed.
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ranking = 4.0048951774698
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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17/30. Usefulness of bone imaging in diagnosis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis.

    Four patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis showing characteristic abnormal uptake on bone imaging are described. Bone imaging was useful in the diagnosis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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18/30. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis. Radiological and pathological study of a specimen with ununited clavicular fracture.

    Anatomico-radiological study of a sternocostoclavicular mass taken post-mortem from a man whose clinical history had shown bilateral sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) with plantar pustulosis for 27 years. The clavicle showed an ununited fracture attributable to a trauma sustained five years earlier. Both clavicular segments showed active remodelling with intraosseous granulation tissue and periosteal metaplastic ossification. The sternocostoclavicular region was fused in a bony block in which there were no signs of remodelling activity. The first rib and the distal extremity of the clavicle were histologically normal. These observations support the conclusions of a previous study of another case of SCCH. The condition might be due to a bone infection caused by an--as yet--unknown germ. Bone remodelling would explain the periosteal hyperostosis and the fragility of the underlying bone. Furthermore, the possibility that the condition might also be a joint disease related to the group of rheumatic diseases called spondyloarthropathies should be considered.
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ranking = 2.0958743701651
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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19/30. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: a review and report of 11 cases.

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is a benign ossifying diathesis of unknown etiology characterized by hyperostosis and soft-tissue ossification between the clavicles, anterior portion of the upper ribs, and manubrium, with variable hyperostosis or ankylosis in the spine and sacroiliac joints. Our cumulative experience with 11 cases is reported, with emphasis on radiographic features of the condition. Scintigraphic results in five patients and computed tomographic findings in one patient are presented. A review of the literature and our own material indicates that sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis may be more common than has been previously recognized.
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ranking = 1.0342662422883
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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20/30. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis. A report of nineteen cases, with special reference to etiology and treatment.

    The cases of nineteen patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis were reviewed retrospectively. Of particular interest were the responses to antibiotics and prostaglandin inhibitors. The prostaglandin inhibitors relieved the pain within three to four weeks in sixteen of eighteen patients so treated. However, the inhibitors gradually became less effective in most patients. Oral antibiotics were more effective than the inhibitors in relieving the pain of eight of the eleven patients who were given antibiotics. Pustulosis palmaris and plantaris, commonly associated with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, diminished after antibiotic therapy, as did the chest pain in most patients. The similarities between the age and sex distributions and the responses to antibiotics of the patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis and those with pustulosis suggest that these disorders have a common etiology, and that the pustulosis may be a so-called bacterid reaction and the hyperostosis, a manifestation of a systemic reaction to a focal infection.
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ranking = 3.0244758873488
keywords = sternocostoclavicular, sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, hyperostosis
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