Cases reported "Bone Resorption"

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11/198. Condylar resorption 2 years following active orthodontic treatment: a case report.

    We recently treated a patient with degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint. A healthy, 12-year-old female with bilateral high maxillary canines presented for orthodontic treatment. Two years after active orthodontic treatment, at age 17, symptoms in her temporomandibular joint manifested and progressed. By the time she revisited our hospital at age 21, the patient had developed an anterior open bite with a long, slender facial appearance. Cephalometric analysis showed shortening of the ramus and backward and downward rotation of the mandible. Imaging studies revealed severe deformity and resorption of the bilateral condyles. Her occlusal and morphologic changes seemed to be caused by degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint.
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keywords = resorption
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12/198. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting with jaw lesions.

    We report an unusual case of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) presenting with jaw lesions in a 14-year-old Chinese boy. The patient presented initially with mobile teeth in all 4 jaw quadrants, with corresponding radiographic detection of alveolar bone crest destruction and periapical bone resorption in the absence of clinically detectable jaw tumors. Moreover, radiographs taken only 17 days later showed clearly distinguishable signs of more extensive alveolar bone destruction compared with the initial radiographs.
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keywords = resorption
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13/198. Long-term follow-up of two children with a variant of mild autosomal recessive osteopetrosis undergoing bone marrow transplantation.

    Malignant autosomal recessive (AR) osteopetrosis represents an absolute indication for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Over the last 15 years, almost 100 BMTs for osteopetrosis have been reported. The median age at transplant of most patients is 4 months. Very few cases of mild AR osteopetrosis have been described. Here, we report the good outcome of two cases of mild AR osteopetrosis with a follow-up of 5 and 6 years, respectively, after an HLA-identical sibling transplant undergone at 5 and 12 years of age, respectively. At the time of BMT, severe visual impairment was present in both children. Bone biopsy demonstrated hypermineralization with virtual obliteration of the medullary spaces, rare microfoci of hematopoiesis and marked deficiency in osteoclastic activity. Successful engraftment was complicated by hypercalcemia, controlled by a combination of bisphosphonate, phosphate infusions, vigorous hydration and calcitonin. Following BMT, radiological and histological findings showed extensive bone resorption with marked augmentation of the osteoclasts in normalized marrow. No improvement was observed in visual acuity, despite complete remodeling of skeletal abnormalities. We conclude that allogeneic BMT is the only chance of curing mild AR osteopetrosis.
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keywords = resorption
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14/198. Higher osteoclastic demineralization and highly mineralized cement lines with osteocalcin deposition in a mandibular cortical bone of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II: ultrastructural and undecalcified histological investigations.

    In this study we report on histological and ultrastructural investigations of the mandibular cortical bone in a case of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II complicated by mandibular osteomyelitis. Histologically, there was a marked increase in the number and size of osteoclasts on the inner bone surface. An undecalcified preparation showed a pair of deeply stained (highly demineralized) and stain-phobic (highly mineralized) layers on the bone surface just beneath the osteoclasts. The layers were incorporated into the bone matrix during the remodeling process as thickened cement lines. A contact microradiogram of the cortical bone revealed highly mineralized layers at the cement lines, which were closely correlated with immunohistochemical evidence of deposition of osteocalcin at the thickened cement lines. Ultrastructural examination showed that the osteoclasts had a typical clear zone, but they were deficient in ruffled border formation and had numerous lysosomal vacuoles containing dense substances. An electron-dense amorphous material layer was present on the bone surface just beneath the osteoclasts as well as at the cement lines. The layer was partly composed of a short fibrillar material, and it partially revealed the lamellar structure. Consequently, an osteoclastic malfunction might be primarily involved in the process of bone matrix resorption rather than demineralization, resulting in higher demineralization and abnormal material deposition on the bone surface and at the cement lines. Furthermore, evidence of active osteoclastic bone resorption with a brush border formation at the bone involved in the inflammatory lesion in this case suggests that the osteoclastic malfunction is influenced and recovered by a microenvironment such as inflammatory cytokines.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = resorption
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15/198. Painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by severe mandibular resorption and nerve compression in a patient with systemic sclerosis: case report and literature review.

    Systemic sclerosis is a multi-system disorder characterized by abundant fibrosis of the skin, blood vessels, and visceral organs. Although resorption of the mandible has been commonly observed and reported, we found no report of resorption leading to a painful neuropathy of the inferior alveolar nerve. We report a case of a patient with systemic sclerosis, severe resorption of the angles, and inferior alveolar border of the mandible, resulting in a compression neuropathy of the inferior alveolar nerve. Diagnostic tests, medical treatment, and surgical treatment are discussed, and the relevant literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = resorption
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16/198. hypercalcemia induced with the plasma levels of parathyroid hormone-related peptide in multiple myeloma.

    A 69-year-old man visited our department of neurology with symptoms of paresthesia on the lower extremities and lumbago. Biochemical examination of serum samples showed hypercalcemia (serum concentration 15.6 mg/dl). The levels of intact parathyroid hormone (i-PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were suppressed, whereas parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) was elevated up to 5.4 pM (normal range: below 0.6 pM). Additionally, bone survey revealed a punched-out lesion in radiological examinations of the skull. Bone marrow aspiration demonstrated many atypical plasma cells suggesting multiple myeloma. Nephrogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), urinary deoxypyridinoline, plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) concentrations were elevated, whereas % of renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate (%TRP) was decreased. The immunohistochemical results demonstrated the expression of PTHrP in atypical plasma cells. These data indicated that hypercalcemia complicating multiple myeloma causes an elevation of renal calcium reabsorption and an increase of bone resorption mediated by PTHrP action.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = resorption
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17/198. Primary neonatal hyperparathyroidism. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    The seventh case in the world literature of primary hyperparathyroidism in a neonate is reported. This is the fifth case in which an autopsy was performed. The clinical and anatomic findings in all seven cases are reviewed and compared. Neonates with primary hyperparathyroidism show diffuse hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands. The bones show disturbed osteogenesis, bone resorption, and widespread fibrosis of the marrow cavities. Bony cysts are not appreciated. Pathologic fractures are common. Marked hypercalciuria or hyperphosphaturia is usually not observed, perhaps because the immature renal tubules fail to respond to the influence of excess parathormone. Aminoaciduria and anemia are commonly observed. The prognosis is grave, and the etiology of this syndrome remains unexplained.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = resorption
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18/198. New insights on the pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in primary hyperparathyroidism is attributed to increased calcium release from bone, increased calcium reabsorption in renal distal tubules, and increased intestinal calcium absorption. However, it remains unclear which factor is the main process. We encountered a 56-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis, in whom hypercalcemia and elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level were observed. diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made. Treatment with methylprednisolone for myasthenia gravis was associated with a marked decrease in both biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption without any changes in endogenous cAMP and serum levels of calcium, PTH, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3]. These findings suggest that the possible pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in primary hyperparathyroidism may be attributed to the increased calcium reabsorption in the kidney and the increased intestinal calcium absorption as a result of stimulated production of 1,25-(OH)2D3 in the kidney. It thus follows that the renal tubular effect rather than the skeletal effect of the PTH excess may play a pivotal role in the development of hypercalcemia in primary hyperparathyroidism.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = resorption
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19/198. acro-osteolysis prior to diagnosis of leprosy.

    lysis (bone resorption) has been observed in a heterogeneous group of congenital and acquired bone disorders. leprosy is the main cause of peripheral neuropathy leading to acro-osteolysis in endemic countries. Pure neuritic leprosy, a less common form of the disease, is difficult to diagnose. Two unrelated leprosy patients with acropathy whose disease began as pure neuritic are discussed.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = resorption
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20/198. Anterior open-bite malocclusion: stability of maxillary repositioning using rigid internal fixation.

    A retrospective cephalometric study was performed to investigate the stability of 37 non-growing anterior open-bite cases using mini-plate rigid fixation. The sample was divided into two groups: Group A: maxillary repositioning alone (17 cases) and Group B: bimaxillary surgery (20 cases). Tracings were performed pre-operatively (T1), immediately post-operatively (T2) and at a minimum of one year follow-up (T3) (12-90 months). In Group A, the maxilla was advanced (3.8 /- 2.8 mm, p < 0.01) and superiorly repositioned at PNS (2.8 /- 2.3 mm, p < 0.001). In Group B, the maxilla was advanced (3.5 /- 3.0 mm, p < 0.01) and superiorly repositioned at PNS (3.7 /- 1.8 mm, p < 0.001); and the mandible (11.7 /- 3.8 mm, p < 0.001), with no significant change in the vertical plane (p > 0.05). Late relapse due to condylar remodelling or resorption was found as a cause of large horizontal relapse (8.0 < x < 14.0 mm) in three cases (15%), the amount being associated with the amount of operative advancement (r = 0.7, r-sq = 40%, p < 0.01). It was concluded that the correction of anterior open bite by posterior repositioning of the maxilla using rigid fixation is a stable procedure during the follow-up period, and that in bimaxillary cases, post-operative stability depends largely on the stability of the mandibular advancement, which in turn relates to the amounts of advancement, the pre-operative anterior open bite and the mandibular plane angle.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = resorption
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