Cases reported "Brain Abscess"

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1/4. Multiple brain abscesses caused by fusobacterium nucleatum treated conservatively.

    BACKGROUND: Multiple brain abscesses are serious neurological problems with high mortality and disabling morbidity. The frequency is rising as a result of AIDS and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients. CASE STUDY: A 59-year-old woman developed signs and symptoms of diffuse brain dysfunction including fever and neck stiffness. A brain CT scan demonstrated nine contrast-enhancing ring-shaped lesions. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid using PCR-technique revealed dna of fusobacterium nucleatum. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was successful. The patient recovered with only mild cognitive deficits. RESULTS: The experience of our patient and the review of the literature indicate that multiple brain abscesses due to fusobacterium nucleatum are rare. The most probable source is oral infection. CONCLUSION: Multiple brain abscesses may be caused by fusobacterium nucleatum. cerebrospinal fluid analysis using PCR technique is helpful with diagnosis. Conservative management can be successful.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nucleatum
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2/4. Fusobacterial brain abscess: a review of five cases and an analysis of possible pathogenesis.

    OBJECT: The cases of five patients with fusobacterial brain abscess are presented. The authors discuss their attempt to determine the pathogenesis. methods: The clinical and microbiological features of five cases of fusobacterial brain abscess are reviewed. Isolates of 2031 Fusobacterium spp. and other anaerobes collected (1989-2002) at our institution were analyzed and compared for incidences and isolation sources. The findings were correlated with extensive literature on the subject. The five patients were men between 45 and 74 years of age. All experienced an insidious onset of the disease and probable hematogenous seeding of the organism(s). One patient had a monomicrobic fusobacterium necrophorum abscess, whereas the others had polymicrobic F. nucleatum abscesses. Despite surgery and a regimen of antibiotic medications and dexamethasone, three patients experienced a paradoxical deterioration 3 days postoperatively that necessitated reevacuation of the lesion. The evacuants observed at that time contained numerous leukocytes but no microorganisms, suggesting intensified inflammation as the likely cause of deterioration. This explanation is supported by literature that fusobacteria strongly activate neutrophils. An analysis of the 2031 anaerobes from blood, wounds, and abscesses showed the considerable virulence of Fusobacterium spp., which were able to enter and/or sustain themselves in the blood circulation. This pattern was similar to that of clostridium spp., but different from those of peptostreptococcus spp., bacteroides spp., and prevotella spp., which were less invasive but more abundant. CONCLUSIONS: Some fusobacterial brain abscesses may be associated with a paradoxical postoperative deterioration, which is probably due to intensified inflammation following treatment. The blood-borne dissemination and invasive behavior of fusobacteria likely initiate such a brain abscess, and further seeding of other synergic bacteria leads to a polymicrobic abscess.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = nucleatum
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3/4. Intraventricular haemorrhage complicating a brain abscess.

    Intraventricular haemorrhage occurred in a patient with a parietal rim-enhancing mass on computed tomographic scan. At operation a brain abscess was identified and removed. peptostreptococcus and fusobacterium were isolated, possibly of dental origin. The possible sources of this intracranial bleeding are discussed. A neoplasm should not always be considered in the case of a cerebral ring-enhancing mass complicated with intracranial bleeding; in selected cases, brain abscess should be excluded too.
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ranking = 0.19997476936615
keywords = fusobacterium
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4/4. Gas-containing brain abscess due to fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Gas-containing brain abscesses are rarely seen. Recently, in a 28-year-old man, such an abscess ruptured into the lateral ventricle but was treated successfully. fusobacterium nucleatum, an anaerobic bacillus, was cultured from the pus obtained.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = nucleatum
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