Cases reported "Brain Edema"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/24. Bilateral sphenoid wing metastases of prostate cancer presenting with extensive brain edema.

    A 76-year-old man insidiously developed diffuse neurological symptoms: cognitive decline, dysphagia, dysphasia and mental disturbance. Computed tomography of the cranium revealed widespread bilateral brain edema and symmetrical bilateral sphenoid wing hyperostosis. Adjacent to the hyperostosis that resembled skull base meningiomas, two separate parenchymatous temporal lobe lesions enhancing with contrast medium were observed. The patient had earlier been diagnosed to have prostatic carcinoma. dexamethasone therapy resulted in discontinuation of the neurological symptoms. The diagnosis of metastasized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was confirmed histologically on autopsy after a sudden death from pneumonia. Intracranial metastases of prostate cancer may have a predilection site at the sphenoid wing, and can mimic a skull base meningioma. Intracranial spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma should be considered in elderly men as a treatable cause of gradual neurological deterioration, especially if cranial malignancy or hyperostosis is found.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/24. Postoperative swelling of pericranial pedicle graft producing intracranial mass effect. Report of two cases.

    Two cases of florid swelling of pericranial pedicle grafts are reported. Intracranial mass effect produced by the grafts necessitated reoperation with graft removal in one case and graft revision in the other. No permanent neurological deficits were incurred by either patient. Venous congestion and associated swelling within the graft were considered to be related to constriction of the graft base at the frontal bone flap-skull base interface in one patient and torsion of the graft base in the other.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/24. Proximal M2 false aneurysm after head trauma--Case report.

    A 72-year-old male presented with a post-traumatic false aneurysm of the right proximal M2 artery with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage after closed head injury. Serial computed tomography (CT) and angiography showed the development of the aneurysm which was verified at autopsy. He was admitted in a drowsy state just after a motorcycle accident. Initial brain CT showed subarachnoid hemorrhage without skull fracture. Follow-up brain CT showed a huge hematoma in the right temporal lobe. He died 47 hours after the accident. Histological examination of the aneurysm showed a false aneurysm. delayed diagnosis of traumatic aneurysms leads to high mortality, so early surgical treatment is essential to save such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 29.248114178042
keywords = skull fracture, skull, fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/24. Applying circular posterior-hinged craniotomy to malignant cerebral edemas.

    Malignant brain edemas are often fatal, regardless of whether they are treated conservatively with sedation, blood pressure management, mannitol-therapy, hyperventilation and hypothermia, or non-conservatively with routine trepanation. Unfortunately, temporal trepanation may result in significant brain damage through herniation of the cerebrum at the edges of the trepanation openings. In one case of a 26-year-old male with severe head injury, a circular posterior-hinged craniotomy (CPHC) was performed after an ineffective unitemporal trepanation for evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma. This ultimately successful operation prompted experimental and morphologic investigations on a new surgical procedure for lowering intracranial pressure (ICP). In 12 of 15 human cadavers, an experimentally ICP was lowered by a CPHC with between 9-21 mm of frontal elevation of the calvaria. Using computer simulation, the frontal elevations of the calvaria were "virtually" performed on 3D reconstructions from CT scans of skulls, and the intracranial volume gained was measured with a computer software program. The volume increase of the cranial cavity showed a relatively constant relation to the cranial capacity and was increased by 6.0% ( /-0.4%) or 78 cm(3) with a 10 mm elevation and by 12.4% ( /-0.7%) or 160 cm(3) with a 20 mm elevation. There were no significant differences with skulls of different ages or ethnic origin; however, a significant effect of gender (F = 7.074; P < or = 0.013) on the gained volume in percent of the cranial capacity for the 20 mm elevation was observed. This difference can be explained by the inverse relationship between volume increase and cranial capacity (r = -0.507; P < or = 0.004).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/24. Virtopsy--fatal motor vehicle accident with head injury.

    A man wearing no protective helmet was struck by a motor vehicle while riding a bicycle. He was loaded on his left side, and the impact point of his head was his occiput on the car roof girder. He was immediately transported to the general hospital, where he passed away. Postmortem examination using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) revealed an extensively comminuted fracture of the posterior part and the base of the skull. Observed were deep direct and contrecoup brain bruises, with the independent fractures of the roof of the both orbits. Massive subdural and subarachnoidal hemorrhage with cerebral edema and shifting of the mid-line towards left side were also detected. MSCT and autopsy results were compared and the body injuries were correlated to vehicle damages. In conclusion, postmortem imaging is a good forensic visualization tool with great potential for documentation and examination of body injuries and pathology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.86325583944933
keywords = skull, fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/24. Postmortem multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of odontoid fractures, atlantoaxial distractions and ascending medullary edema.

    Non-invasive imaging methods are increasingly entering the field of forensic medicine. Facing the intricacies of classical neck dissection techniques, postmortem imaging might provide new diagnostic possibilities which could also improve forensic reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine the value of postmortem neck imaging in comparison to forensic autopsy regarding the evaluation of the cause of death and the analysis of biomechanical aspects of neck trauma. For this purpose, 5 deceased persons (1 female and 4 male, mean age 49.8 years, range 20-80 years) who had suffered odontoid fractures or atlantoaxial distractions with or without medullary injuries, were studied using multislice computed tomography (MSCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequent forensic autopsy. Evaluation of the findings was performed by radiologists, forensic pathologists and neuropathologists. The cause of death could be established radiologically in three of the five cases. MRI data were insufficient due to metal artefacts in one case, and in another, ascending medullary edema as the cause of delayed death was only detected by histological analysis. Regarding forensic reconstruction, the imaging methods were superior to autopsy neck exploration in all cases due to the post-processing possibilities of viewing the imaging data. In living patients who suffer medullary injury, follow-up MRI should be considered to exclude ascending medullary edema.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.90813959862333
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/24. Mechanisms of edema after gamma knife surgery for meningiomas. Report of two cases.

    The authors describe two patients in whom tumor swelling and brain swelling (and possible tumor swelling), respectively, developed after undergoing gamma knife surgery. One had a skull defect with a palpable parasagittal tumor. One had neurofibromatosis Type 2 with multiple tumors, one of which was parasagittal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/24. Malignant cerebral infarction secondary to internal carotid injury in closed head trauma: good outcome with aggressive treatment--a case report.

    A 25-year-old male patient in whom occlusion of the internal carotid artery developed secondary to a skull base fracture is presented. The diagnosis of internal carotid artery occlusion was reached 12 hours after the admission and 17 hours after the injury. The patient was initially treated for ischemic edema and when the patient showed signs of cerebral herniation, decompressive craniectomy was necessary. The outcome was good. The clinical and radiologic characteristics of internal carotid artery occlusion in closed head injury are highlighted and treatment options are reviewed in light of pertinent literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.68162791972467
keywords = skull, fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/24. scalp swelling crossing the suture line on skull radiograph: is it always a sign of caput succedaneum?

    Caput succedaneum is the soft swelling of the neonatal scalp that may extend over the suture line, as opposed to cephalhaematoma, which is restricted by the suture. However, if caput succedaneum and cephalhaematoma coexist and the swelling crosses the suture line, it may be diagnosed as caput succedaneum and the cephalhaematoma will be easily missed, both on the radiograph and clinically. We report an interesting MR finding in a neonate who simultaneously showed both caput succedaneum and cephalhaematoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/24. Early combined cranioplasty and programmable shunt in patients with skull bone defects and CSF-circulation disorders.

    OBJECTIVE: This study assesses the clinical outcome after early combined cranioplasty (own frozen bone) and shunt implantation (Codman-Medos programmable VP shunt) in patients with skull bone defects and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation disorders.METHOD: medical records were reviewed retrospectively for the last 100 patients with CSF disorders after trauma or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), who previously underwent decompressive craniotomy owing to therapy-resistant brain swelling. patients treated with early (5 to 7 weeks after injury) combined cranioplasty and shunt implantation were analysed and a follow-up for the survivors was obtained.RESULTS: In 60 patients with a daily CSF external drainage over 150 ml and dilated ventricles in CT scan, a programmable VP shunt was implanted simultaneously with the cranioplasty within 5.1 weeks after decompression. The neurological condition 6 months later was good (independent patients) in 39 cases (65%); 12 patients (20%) survived with a severe disability; three patients (5%) remained in a persistent vegetative state and only six patients (10%) died. There were few complications: bone or shunt infection (three cases), post-operative intracranial bleeding (one case), transitory neurological impairment after bone reimplantation (two cases), bone resorption (two cases) and shunt dysfunction (three cases).CONCLUSION: The early reimplantation of the patient's own skull bone combined to the employment of a programmable shunt system allowed us a dynamic adjustment of the intracranial pressure (ICP) changes. The combined treatment reduced the number of required surgical procedures, complications and unsatisfactory patient outcomes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Brain Edema'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.