Cases reported "Brain Neoplasms"

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1/771. Secondary glioblastoma remarkably reduced by steroid administration after anaplastic transformation from gliomatosis cerebri--case report.

    A 45-year-old female presented with gliomatosis cerebri manifesting as hemiballismus-like involuntary movement in the arm, motor weakness in the leg, and hypesthesia in her left side. Computed tomography showed only diffuse swelling of the right cerebral hemisphere, but T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed a diffuse lesion spreading from the right thalamus to the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes on the same side. No abnormal enhancement was recognized. cerebral angiography showed no specific finding. A right occipital lobectomy was performed to confirm the diagnosis of gliomatosis cerebri. Anaplastic transformation was recognized 5 months later. The disease did not resolve with radiation or interferon administration, but steroid therapy achieved remarkably effective tumor regression. The patient died due to pneumonia. autopsy showed the features of diffuse glioblastoma. Steroid therapy may be an effective treatment for gliomatosis cerebri before the terminal stage.
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2/771. Successful removal of a hemangioblastoma from the medulla oblongata: case report.

    Hemangioblastomas are histologically benign tumors that occur exclusively within the neuraxis, most commonly in the posterior fossa. They are typically cystic tumors located in the cerebellum. Excision of the vascular mural nodules leads to cure. brain stem lesions are rarely reported. Surgical extirpation of a solid brain stem hemangioblastoma is relatively risky and requires precise microsurgical techniques. We present a woman with a hemangioblastoma embedded in the medulla oblongata. This 33-year-old woman presented with occipital headaches and sensory ataxia. Complete and detailed preoperative imaging studies were followed by successful microsurgical excision of the lesion. The patient recovered completely within 2 weeks after the operation except for mild paresthesia of the legs. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography provided important information regarding the nature, location, and blood supply of this lesion, which facilitated its total removal. The importance of intraoperative identification and control of the feeding artery of the tumor is emphasized.
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3/771. An unusual case of cephalocele associated with lipoma of corpus callosum.

    Cephalocele is a part of the family of neural tube defects. Although the frequency has ranged from 1 per 2,400 to 1 per 12,500 live births, the true incidence has been hidden in stillborns, underreferral of massive defects and early pregnancy losses. It has been suggested that the size, the content of the sac and associated hydrocephalus were unfavorable factors for the prognosis. Cephaloceles may occur as isolated malformations or together with other anomalies, and associated abnormalities are present in up to 50% of the cases. We report an unusual case of encephalocele associated with lipoma of corpus callosum, and the features of magnetic resonance imaging are discussed.
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4/771. Three AML patients with existing or pre-existing intracerebral granulocytic sarcomas who were successfully treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantations.

    We report three acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients who developed intracerebral granulocytic sarcomas (GS) and were successfully treated with allogeneic BMT (allo-BMT). The diagnosis of one patient was AML M2 with myelofibrosis, and the other two patients were AML M4 with eosinophilia (AML M4 Eo), according to the FAB classification. Two patients first experienced a relapse in the brain that resulted in the formation of GS, followed by a relapse in the bone marrow. The remaining patient developed an optic nerve GS after suffering a bone marrow relapse. All three patients received irradiation for the GS and systemic chemotherapy before the allo-BMT. TBI was used for conditioning, and GVHD prophylaxis was with cyclosporine (CsA) and short-term MTX in all three cases. These patients are currently 9 to 37 months post-BMT without relapse. Thus, our experience suggests that allo-BMT is an effective treatment for AML patients with existing or pre-existing intracerebral GS.
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5/771. The hPMS2 exon 5 mutation and malignant glioma. Case report.

    patients with Turcot syndrome (TS) are predisposed to colon tumors and primary brain tumors, typically glioblastomas or medulloblastomas. The authors describe a patient with TS featuring a known germline mutation of exon 5 of the hPMS2 mismatch repair gene who developed two metachronous glioblastomas, both with distinct oligodendroglial features. Molecular genetic analysis revealed allelic loss of chromosome 19q in the patient's second tumor but no allelic loss of chromosome 1p. Prominent microsatellite instability was also found in this tumor, consistent with a germline mismatch repair defect. Because this patient had an unusual underlying condition and his tumor had a unique histological appearance for TS, it was hypothesized that this genetic defect may predispose to malignant gliomas with oligodendroglial features. The authors therefore evaluated whether sporadic glioblastomas and oligodendrogliomas undergo mutations of this region of the hPMS2 gene. However, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of hPMS2 exon 5 failed to reveal mutations in 20 sporadic glioblastomas and 16 sporadic oligodendroglial gliomas. Thus, although it is possible that the germline hPMS2 exon 5 mutation may predispose to glioblastomas with an oligodendroglial component, the same genetic defect is not commonly involved in sporadic oligodendrogliomas or glioblastomas.
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6/771. Surgery of angiomas in the brainstem with a stress on the presence of telangiectasia.

    This report deals with the surgery of angiomas other than arteriovenous malformation in the brainstem. The surgical cases were three cavernomas, two telangiectasias, and two venous malformations. We performed surgery when an angioma bled and the resulting hematoma was situated near the surface of the brainstem or the fourth ventricle. The cases were operated on at the subacute or chronic stages after hemorrhage. Although a magnetic resonance (MR) image showed a subacute or chronic localized hematoma with a low intensity rim, the case was not always a cavernoma, but a telangiectasia. Cavernomas could be totally removed, but telangiectasia could not. In the cases of medullary venous malformation the diagnosis was obtained radiologically, and when the hematoma was large, only hematoma evacuation was performed. In all cases the postoperative Karnofsky scores were improved or unchanged. Postoperative rebleeding in the hematoma cavity continued insidiously in a case of telangiectasia. The abnormal vessels of telangiectasia in the brainstem were preoperatively not visualized by cerebral angiography or MR imaging, but became visualized by enhanced MR imaging after evacuation of hematoma in two cases. It is stressed that an angioma with a hematoma intensity core surrounded by a low intensity rim on MR images is not always a cavernoma, but possibly is a telangiectasia.
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7/771. Primary cerebral neuroblastoma. A clinicopathological study of 35 cases.

    A series of 35 primary cerebral neuroblastoma is reported. These rare tumours occur most often in children in the first half of the first decade. Grossly the tumors are often massive, discrete, lobular, firm and cystic. Histologically three variants, largely determined by the extent and distribution of the fibrous connective tissue stroma, are recognized: (1) a classical variant, which most resembles the peripheral neuroblastoma and is characterized by a high frequency of Homer Wright rosettes and a relatively high frequency of ganglionic differentiation; (2) a desmoplastic variant, which is characterized by an intense connective tissue stroma; and (3) a transitional variant, in which both the classical and the desmoplastic features may be present within the same case, either concurrently or consecutively. Both the desmoplastic and the transitional forms are less likely to exhibit differentiation to mature ganglion cells, but the importance of identifying the primitive cell elements as neuroblasts is emphasized. With rare exceptions, this can be established only by specific silver impregnations on frozen material. Occasionally the direction of growth may be largely leptomeningeal. Seven illustrative clinical histories with pathological correlations are described. The over-all clinical behaviour of these tumours is that of malignant neuroepithelial neoplasms, characterized by a high recurrence rate. recurrence may, however, be a late development, in some cases occurring five or seven years after apparently successful surgical removal. The tumour shows shows a high incidence of metastatic spread, almost 40 per cent of the cases examined at autopsy having disseminated in the cerebrospinal pathways. Exceptionally, extraneural metastases may also develop. However, long post-operative survival occasionally occurs, and the subsequent clinical course is not always predictable in the individual case. The differential diagnosis is briefly discussed. The cellular nature of the tumour and its biological behaviour recall those of the cerebellar medulloblastoma. Post-operative radiation to the entire neuraxis should be considered for these neoplasms.
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8/771. The Chiari II malformation: lesions discovered within the fourth ventricle.

    Structural lesions associated with the Chiari II malformation have been identified within the fourth ventricle in 8 patients. During the 42-month period encompassing the operations of the 7 patients treated surgically, only 9 other patients were explored without the discovery of some associated structural lesion. The patients ranged in age from 2 to 26 years. The following lesions were identified: glial or arachnoidal cysts (3 patients), glial or choroidal nodules (3 patients) and subependymoma (2 patients). These lesions were all situated in the roof of the fourth ventricle adjacent to or interspersed with the choroid plexus. Only the cystic lesions were identified by preoperative imaging. In only 1 case did the associated lesion, a 2-cm cyst, seem to contribute to the patient's clinical presentation. Structural lesions of the fourth ventricle associated with the Chiari II malformation are common in patients who are submitted to decompression. These lesions may be dysplasias of developmental origin, or they may be reactive lesions related to chronic compression and ischemia. They do not necessarily required biopsy or excision.
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9/771. A distinctive glioneuronal tumor of the adult cerebrum with neuropil-like (including "rosetted") islands: report of 4 cases.

    Four examples of a novel glioneuronal neoplasm are presented. All tumors affected adults (including two males and two females aged 25-40 years) as supratentorial, cerebral hemispheric masses with associated seizure activity and, in one case, symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and progressive hemiparesis. CT scans in two cases revealed hypodense masses without calcification. MRI scans at presentation demonstrated, in all cases, solid T1-hypointense and T2-hyperintense tumors with mass effect in one instance but no edema or contrast enhancement. Only one was relatively circumscribed on neuroradiologic study. All were infiltrative in their histologic growth pattern and predominantly glial in appearance, being composed mainly of fibrillary, gemistocytic, or protoplasmic astroglial elements of WHO grade II to III. Their distinguishing feature was their content of sharply delimited, neuropil-like islands of intense synaptophysin reactivity inhabited and rimmed in rosetted fashion by cells demonstrating strong nuclear immunolabeling for the neuronal antigens NeuN and Hu. These cells included small, oligodendrocyte-like ("neurocytic") elements as well as larger, more pleomorphic forms. Two cases contained, in addition, well-differentiated neurons of medium to ganglion-cell size. Proliferative activity was observed principally within the glial compartment; two cases contained mitotic figures and exhibited relatively elevated MIB-1 indices (6.8% and 8.2%). One of the latter progressed and proved fatal at 30 months following subtotal resection and radiotherapy. The three other patients are alive at intervals of 14 to 83 months, two tumor-free and one with extensive disease associated with the appearance of enhancement on MRI. This glioneuronal tumor variant may pursue an unfavorable clinical course.
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10/771. Gliomatosis cerebri with secondary glioblastoma formation: report of two cases.

    The clinicopathological features of two cases of gliomatosis cerebri associated with secondary glioblastoma formation are reported. In both cases, glial cells were diffusely distributed in the supra- and infratentorial regions and underlying brain structures were preserved from the onset. In spite of such diffuse distribution of neoplastic glial cells, similar to that observed in low-grade astrocytoma, in both cases the tumor underwent complete remission after radiotherapy. However, the tumor recurred as a localized glioblastoma in both cases, 37 months (case 1) and 7 months (case 2) after the radiotherapy. In both cases, recurrence was accompanied by prominent dissemination of CSF. The recurrent tumors were radiation resistant, and the patients' conditions deteriorated rapidly after recurrence. The present two cases demonstrated that gliomatosis cerebri, classified among brain tumors of unknown origin by the world health organization, may transform into highly proliferative circumscribed tumors, in spite of their good response to radiotherapy. Examination of pathological features and their correlation with MRI findings may allow us to better understand the response to radiotherapy and the process of recurrence.
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