Cases reported "Breast Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/81. radiation-induced localized scleroderma in breast cancer patients.

    radiation-induced scleroderma in breast cancer patients appears to occur in approximately one out of every 500 patients. We report four cases that developed within 3 months of conservative breast surgery and postoperative radiation treatment. The reaction was contained entirely within the treatment field and demonstrated the typical features of this condition where the breast becomes erythematous, violaceous, indurated, retracted, and progressively pigmented. The breast tends to soften and become more comfortable over 1-4 years; however, significant induration, retraction and pigmentary changes remain. There appears to be no predictive factors. radiation-induced scleroderma must be differentiated from cellulitis and recurrent breast cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/81. myiasis secondary to Sermatobia hominis (human botfly) presenting as a long-standing breast mass.

    A case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with a breast mass is reported. Histologically, a chronic granulomatous inflammatory response was observed. The response was associated with an organism diagnosed as a fly larva, Dermatobia hominis (human botfly). The incidence of myiasis, infestation by fly larvae, presenting as a long-standing breast mass and mimicking a neoplasm is extremely rare, especially in the united states.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.016253206114702
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/81. The rational clinical examination. Does this patient have breast cancer? The screening clinical breast examination: should it be done? How?

    CONTEXT: The clinical breast examination (CBE) is widely recommended and practiced as a tool for breast cancer screening; however, its effectiveness is dependent on its precision and accuracy. OBJECTIVE: To collect evidence on the effectiveness of CBE in screening for breast cancer and information on the best technique to use. DATA SOURCES: We searched the English-language literature using the medline database (1966-1997) and manual review of all reference lists, as well as contacting investigators of several published studies for clarifications and unpublished data. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: To study CBE effectiveness, we included all controlled trials and case-control studies in which CBE was at least part of the screening modality; for technique, we included both clinical studies and those that used silicone breast models. All 3 authors reviewed and agreed on the studies selected for inclusion in the pooled analyses. DATA SYNTHESIS: Randomized clinical trials demonstrated reduced breast cancer mortality rates among women screened by both CBE and mammography. Evidence of CBE's independent contribution was less direct; CBE alone detected between 3% and 45% of breast cancers found that screening mammography missed. The precision of CBE was difficult to determine because of the lack of consistent and standardized examination techniques. Studies on CBE precision reported fair agreement (kappa = 0.22-0.59). Pooling trial data, we estimated CBE sensitivity at 54% and specificity at 94%. The likelihood ratio of a positive CBE result is 10.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8-19.2), while the likelihood ratio of a negative test result is 0.47 (95% CI, 0.40-0.56). Longer duration of CBE and a higher number of specific techniques used were associated with greater accuracy. The preferred technique for CBE includes proper positioning of the patient, thoroughness of search, use of a vertical-strip search pattern, proper position and movement of the fingers, and a CBE duration of at least 3 minutes per breast. The value of inspection is unproved. Professional and lay examiners improved their sensitivity on silicone breast models after being taught this technique. CONCLUSIONS: Indirect evidence supports the effectiveness of CBE in screening for breast cancer. Although the screening clinical examination by itself does not rule out disease, the high specificity of certain abnormal findings greatly increases the probability of breast cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/81. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast presenting as a breast abscess.

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the breast is a very rare neoplasm, with only 75 cases reported in the English literature. Herein, we report four new cases and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of this unusual tumor in a retrospective review of all cases of SCC of the breast at our institution from 1990 to 1998. Four patients with breast SCC were identified, with a mean age of 70 years. Two patients with "pure" SCC (no features of ductal carcinoma) were initially treated for breast abscess. Two other patients with features of both SCC and ductal carcinoma had skin erythema associated with an underlying mass, and infectious etiology was considered in each case. Mean tumor size was 4.9 cm. Both patients with pure SCC underwent extensive evaluation for primary tumors at other sites. Two patients developed early systemic metastasis. SCC of the breast is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and may be confused with breast abscess. For this reason, breast biopsy should be considered in cases of breast abscess. Treatment of primary SCC of the breast is similar to that of more common types of breast cancer (i.e., breast conservation is possible and lymph node dissection is recommended). Because metastasis to the breast from other primary tumor sites has been reported (lung, cervix, skin, and esophagus), patients with pure SCC should undergo evaluation to exclude this possibility.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.18291987278137
keywords = cancer, neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/81. F-18 FDG uptake in breast infection and inflammation.

    PURPOSE: Whole-body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning has been useful in the management of breast cancer. However, F-18 FDG uptake sometimes has been associated with benign breast disease. Four cases are reported of F-18 FDG breast uptake caused by infectious or inflammatory mastitis that mimics malignant disease. methods AND RESULTS: Two women had F-18 FDG whole-body scans for the evaluation of a large breast mass after inconclusive results of ultrasonography. In both cases, intense focal F-18 FDG breast uptake was noted that mimicked breast cancer. Histologic examination showed, in one patient, chronic granulomatous infiltration that likely represented tuberculous mastitis, because she showed a good clinical response to empirical anti-tuberculous treatment. The second patient had lactational changes associated with acute inflammation, and the culture grew staphylococcus aureus. The breast mass completely disappeared 3 weeks after a course of antibiotic treatment. The other two patients had staging F-18 FDG PET scans 1 and 12 months after lumpectomy for breast carcinoma to detect residual, recurrent, or metastatic disease. Both scans showed a ring-like uptake in the involved breast, with superimposed intense focal uptake suggesting tumor necrosis centrally and malignant foci peripherally. In both cases, histologic examination revealed hemorrhagic inflammation secondary to postsurgical hematomas and no evidence of malignancy. CONCLUSION: Acute or chronic infectious mastitis and postsurgical hemorrhagic inflammatory mastitis should be considered in patients who have a breast mass, especially those with a history of tenderness or surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/81. Giant-sized condyloma of the breast with focal acantholytic changes.

    BACKGROUND: A healthy 26-year-old pregnant woman presented with a 6.0-cm exophytic mass in her left inframammary fold. The lesion was surgically excised. methods: Histopathologic sections of the skin lesion were reviewed in hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides. Additional sections were studied by an in situ hybridization method for human papillomavirus dna (HPV) types 6 and 11. RESULTS: The histopathologic examination demonstrated a benign exophytic, verrucous and papillary epidermal proliferation with features of condyloma acuminatum. Reactivity to HPV dna types 6 and 11 was demonstrated by in situ hybridization method. The epidermis adjacent to, and focally within, the neoplasm showed multiple areas of suprabasilar and intraepidermal acantholysis without dyskeratosis. CONCLUSIONS: Condylomas related to HPV 6 and 11 may be found in extragenital locations including conjunctiva, oral and nasal mucosa. To our knowledge, however, the extragenital condylomas described in the literature have not included the giant-sized variant. We describe an example of a benign, giant-sized condyloma acuminatum of the breast with nearby acantholytic alterations similar to Hailey-Hailey disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.016253206114702
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/81. New bilateral microcalcifications at mammography in a postlactational woman: case report.

    A 33-year-old woman with a strong family history of breast cancer who was referred for mammography 5 weeks after completing lactation was found to have new diffuse bilateral microcalcifications in the breast ducts. Contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast showed bilateral patchy areas of abnormal enhancement. Large-core needle biopsy showed diffuse calcifications within expanded benign ducts in a background of lactational change, without evidence of malignancy. To the authors' knowledge, these calcifications have not been previously reported and are possibly related to milk stasis or apoptosis associated with lactation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/81. Sudden hemorrhage of the breast caused by breast cancer: a case report and review of the literature.

    A rare case of sudden hemorrhage caused by breast cancer is reported. A 71-year-old woman noted bleeding from her left breast. physical examination of the left breast showed a localized open cavity accompanied by bleeding and coagulation. The patient had no history of breast trauma or anticoagulation therapy. Incisional biopsy followed by histological examination resulted in a diagnosis of granulation tissue with no cancer cells present. mammography and ultrasonography indicated probable breast cancer. As a result, a second incisional biopsy was performed, which suggested invasive ductal carcinoma without histological skin invasion. A modified radical mastectomy was performed under a diagnosis of stage II breast cancer. breast cancer with sudden hemorrhage is rare. We review the literature and discuss the cause of this unusual manifestation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/81. sarcoidosis of the breast: implications for the general surgeon.

    sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease that may involve the breast parenchyma and can be confused with benign or malignant tumors. A recent case of sarcoidosis of the breast treated in our institution prompted us to review the world literature on the topic. From 1921 to 1997, 45 cases relating to sarcoidosis of the breast were reported; 10 of these cases were excluded from our review because of the lack of histological proof of sarcoidosis. The data were organized according to clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, treatment plan, and follow-up care. The mean age at presentation was 47 years (range 20-72 years) and all patients were female. Seven patients (20%) had a breast mass as primary presentation of sarcoidosis without any clinical evidence of systemic sarcoidosis. Thirty-one patients (89%) presented with a self-detected mass and three patients (8%) demonstrated skin dimpling and peau d'orange appearance mimicking cancer. The size of the breast lesions ranged from 0.25 to 5 cm in diameter. One patient presented with bilateral breast lesions and one with more than one lesion in the same affected breast. A single breast mass was found in the rest of the patients. Of the seven patients evaluated by mammography, only one revealed changes suspicious for malignancy. Fine-needle aspiration was used only in four cases; the results of two were compatible with sarcoidosis and two required an excisional biopsy as a result of inconclusive results. Seventeen cases reported excisional biopsy as the diagnostic procedure. In 11 patients the type of biopsy was not stated. In two cases of radical mastectomies for breast adenocarcinoma, sarcoidosis was an incidental finding, either in the remaining breast tissue or in the axillary nodes. One patient underwent a partial mastectomy revealing sarcoidosis as the definitive diagnosis. Ultrasound was used in two cases; one revealed a suspicious lesion and one was inconclusive. Although sarcoidosis of the breast constitutes a rare entity it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of breast cancer even in patients without clinical evidence of systemic sarcoidosis. These patients should undergo a biopsy to rule out malignancy because clinical findings, mammography, and ultrasound results can be misleading or inconclusive.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/81. Nodular fasciitis of the breast simulating breast cancer on imaging.

    Nodular fasciitis is a rare benign soft tissue tumour of the breast that clinically and radiologically can mimic invasive duct carcinoma. The clinical, radiological and pathological findings of nodular fasciitis of the breast in a 38-year-old woman, who presented with a palpable lesion in the upper inner aspect of the left breast, are described. The tumour is characterized histologically by a stellate spindle cell tumour with a focal myxoid background containing scattered inflammatory cells and microhaemorrhages. Pathological assessment of the lesion is essential in making the diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Breast Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.