Cases reported "Breast Neoplasms, Male"

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21/109. Male breast neoplasia in association with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor therapy: a report of three cases.

    Male breast cancer is a rare condition with very poorly understood risk factors. We report three cases of men with malignant and pre-malignant breast disease who had all been prescribed selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression. Concerns about an association between this group of drugs and breast cancer in women have been previously raised and experimental evidence has suggested that these drugs could influence regulation of cellular proliferation acting through internal cellular messengers. risk factors for the development of breast cancer are likely to be multifactorial, possibly more so in women given the complex physiological changes that occur in the female breast. Whilst the cases we report are anecdotal and other risk factors may be present, we suggest that assessment of any possible contribution that SSRI therapy may make to the development of breast neoplasia may be more easily assessed in a male population. copyright Harcourt Publishers Limited.
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22/109. Pituitary prolactin-secreting macroadenoma combined with bilateral breast cancer in a 45-year-old male.

    We describe an unusual case of bilateral breast cancer synchronous with pituitary macroprolactinoma in a young male. Up to date, only very few of such cases have been described worldwide and to our knowledge this is the first one in which both breast cancer and pituitary macroadenoma have been found together at the time of presentation. A 45-year-old male was diagnosed as having a pituitary macroprolactinoma and bilateral breast cancer on the basis of hypogonadism (testosterone 2.9 pmol/l) with very high levels of prolactin (33,100 U/l), typical neuroradiologic finding of a pituitary macroadenoma, marked bilateral gynecomastia with mammographic pattern highly suspected for cancer and subsequent hystological confirmation. Bilateral mastectomy was performed and medical therapy with bromocriptine 10 mg/day was started. After 2-year follow-up the patient is disease-free. Hormonal, neuroradiological and oncological patterns are all negative or markedly improved. We stress the importance of prolactin for its possible biological effects on breast cancer induction or growth. Moreover in any case of hyperprolactinemia we suggest a mammographic examination and, in the case of breast cancer, at least a baseline hormonal profile.
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23/109. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing male breast cancer accompanied with hepatocellular carcinoma: assessment by lectin-affinity profile.

    An autopsy case associated with both male breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma in which serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was extremely elevated is described. The source of AFP production was investigated. In lectin-affinity chromatography of the patient's serum, concanavalin a (ConA) binding pattern was not consistent with that of hepatocellular carcinoma, and lens culinaris agglutinin A (LCA) affinity indicated a similar pattern to hepatocellular carcinoma. The immunohistochemistry staining for AFP revealed positive reactivity in breast cancer cells, but was negative in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of breast cancer exhibiting immunohistochemically positive AFP in breast cancer cells. In the present case, ConA binding test was useful for identification of the source of AFP production. Furthermore, corresponding aggravation of breast cancer to the elevation of AFP suggested the possibility that AFP might enhance breast cancer growth.
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24/109. Intracystic breast carcinoma in a male: Unusual case presentation and literature review.

    breast carcinoma in males is rare and accounts for 0.5-1.5% of all breast carcinomas. Intracystic breast carcinoma is distinctly uncommon and represents approximately 5-7.5% of all breast cancers in males. On physical examination and radiologic imaging, these lesions often appear benign; however, the presence of an intracystic solid component is typical and should raise the suspicion of carcinoma. We report an unusual case of intracystic breast carcinoma presenting in a male and review the literature.
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25/109. The dermatologist's role in diagnosing a rare disease--male breast cancer.

    After discussing the rarity of male breast carcinoma, I present the case of a 75-year-old white man who, during an office visit for a second opinion regarding his eczema, was found to have breast cancer. (While examining the patient's integument, I found an inverted nipple and a subareolar mass.) I also discuss the need for dermatologists to emphasize to their patients the importance of complete general skin examinations. This case is, I believe, the first case of invasive primary male breast carcinoma to be reported in the dermatologic literature.
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26/109. Male ductal carcinoma in situ presenting as bloody nipple discharge: a case report and literature review.

    Male breast carcinoma accounts for 1% of all diagnosed breast carcinoma. Pure ductal carcinoma in situ in men is extremely rare. Unfortunately, male breast cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage because of the minimal awareness of presenting symptoms by the patient and sometimes by the health care provider. Because of this late presentation, the overall prognosis is less favorable. This case is presented to emphasize the importance of recognizing bloody nipple discharge as a clinical sign of male ductal carcinoma in situ and an opportunity for early diagnosis.
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27/109. Male inflammatory breast cancer.

    A case of a 48-year-old male with an inflammatory breast cancer is used to illustrate this uncommon malignancy. The physical examination of thickening and erythema made the clinical diagnosis. Mammographic findings of increased density in the right breast with coarsened stroma and an underlying mass confirmed the clinical findings. The sonographic evaluation revealed a 2-cm ill-defined hypoechoic mass. The pathologic examination of the mastectomy specimen showed an infiltrating duct cell carcinoma with lobular features. Male breast cancer afflicts 1500 men each year. Clinically it must be differentiated from gynecomastia, a much more common and benign condition.
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28/109. Unusual cases of metastases to the breast. A report of 17 cases diagnosed by fine needle aspiration.

    BACKGROUND: Although nonmammary tumors metastatic to the breast are relatively uncommon, a correct diagnosis is essential to appropriate management. Radiologically these lesions are single, round, discrete lesions without the spiculations of primary malignancies. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) may provide a definitive diagnosis, thereby sparing patients unnecessary surgery. CASES: Seventeen cases of nonmammary malignancies diagnosed by fine needle aspiration of the breast were identified in the cytopathology files at three different institutions from 1989 to 1999. Three of the cases are of particular interest, including a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary gland origin and a small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of rectal origin, neither of which has been reported in the literature previously. The third case was a male with a breast mass that was originally thought to be primary based on clinical, cytologic and immunocytochemical features but subsequently was determined to be a metastasis from the lung. CONCLUSION: Virtually any malignancy may metastasize to the breast. FNAB is the best approach to the diagnosis of tumors that either clinically or radiographically are not typical of primary breast tumors. Extramammary neoplasms metastatic to the breast may be definitively diagnosed by FNAB, resulting in the most appropriate as well as cost-effective patient management.
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ranking = 0.06400846576225
keywords = neoplasm
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29/109. Myofibroblastoma of the male breast: a diagnostic problem on fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    Myofibroblastoma is an uncommon neoplasm of the male breast. Herein, we describe the cytologic features seen in the fine-needle aspirate of a 45-year-old man. The smears were cellular with intimate association of tumor cells with extracellular matrix material. The cells were spindle to polygonal and were without significant atypia. Numerous mast cells were observed. Nuclear grooving was present only occasionally, although this was conspicuous histologically. The presence of hyaline bands in between tumor cells, another interesting feature, was appreciated retrospectively. This neoplasm was initially misinterpreted as a malignant soft tissue tumor. awareness of the cytologic features coupled with mammography should prevent a misdiagnosis of this tumor.
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ranking = 0.1280169315245
keywords = neoplasm
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30/109. A male patient with metachronous triple cancers of small cell lung, prostate and breast.

    We present a very rare case of metachronous triple cancers, including small cell carcinoma of the lung, as well as prostate and male breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of its kind. A 64-year-old man was referred to our hospital with left nipple retraction. He had previously undergone lobectomy of the right lung as treatment for small cell lung cancer at 57 years of age, and at 61 years of age, he had undergone prostatectomy and bilateral orchiectomy for prostate cancer, histologically determined to be moderately or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. physical examination identified a painless irregular hard tumor in the left breast. ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a nodular mass, and fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma. Modified radical mastectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the breast tumor was scirrhous carcinoma, t1, n0, m0, stage T. immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the prostate tumor was positive for prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and negative for estrogen receptor (ER), while the breast tumor was positive for ER and negative for PSA. Primary breast cancer was diagnosed. At present, 1 year and 8 months after surgical removal of the breast cancer, the patient has had no recurrence of breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, or prostate cancer. We discuss the possible causes of the triple cancers in this case with reference to the literature.
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ranking = 4.6666666666667
keywords = cancer
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